To market to your target audience, you should create a Pinterest business account. As mentioned, this free account provides you with access to Pinterest Analytics (which we’ll review in more detail shortly) and other handy marketing features such as a profile that clearly states you’re a business, Pinterest widgets, and Pinterest tag. If you already have a Pinterest account and want to convert it into a Pinterest business account, you can also do that without losing any of your content or work.
Great post Tiffany! You write in such a common sense, matter of fact way that resonates with me for sure! I love what you said about Pinterest being a site dedicated to problems and solutions. I’ve taken many free and paid courses teaching how to use the Pinterest search bar for blog ideas, but once again, I love how you simply the process and make it make sense! Bravo to you and congratulations on your success!
If you don’t want to spend the next few months in trial and error, I highly recommend investing in a good Pinterest course. Not only will that polish any mistakes that you might be making with your Pinterest account, but it will help you form a bullet proof strategy! Start by taking the Pinterest Primer free course here and do your research online.
I pin ten times per day, 7 of my own pins and 3 of other peoples. I aim to pin my most popular content first, found in my Google or Pinterest analytics. Then I pin seasonal content, and then lastly, my new content. I primarily focus on personal boards instead of group boards and I check my Tailwind stats one time per month to inform me on how it’s working. I check my analytics to see how my pins are performing there as well.
You should also repin content that your audience would like to your boards. No matter how much content you create, your audience will want more. Repinning other people’s content helps give that to them. It also helps build rapport with those whose content your repinning to share with your audience. You should view your social media content as being a resource to those that follow you, so give them valuable content, both yours and others.
I started using interval because I was hugely paranoid about spamming group boards (it took me ages to even get up the courage to post anything to the first one, lol) and mainly because I thought it would be good to drip the content out over time rather than in one big rush. Initially I thought that I could just keep each pin cycling through my group board list indefinitely, but that doesn’t take into account that as I make more pins, they start to stack and I might overwhelm the boards.
Hector – it’s possible that the difference actually has to do with the pictures themselves. When I pin a blog post that has awesome content but a so-so picture that’s not very evocative, it normally doesn’t do very well on Pinterest. But when the photo is a great one, it gets passed around like crazy! I know it’s tough to find business-related photos that aren’t cheesy stock images, but it’s worth doing some digging. I’d advise testing out some different photos out and tracking your results per photo. Best of luck!

As a general rule, you want your boards to be 50 percent about your business and 50 percent about the interests of your audience that tie back to your business. By pinning your audience interest as well as your own content, you will entice them to engage with you more on Pinterest. When they engage with you more, Pinterest will show users your content more frequently in their feed.
Your cover photo is your first impression and the first thing a user sees when they come to your page. Hence, it is important to make it attractive. Also, Pinterest allows you to choose which pin to use as your cover image. Therefore, don’t forget to optimize the Cover photos on Pinterest of each board. Lastly, choose a high-quality image that is attractive and bright for your cover photo.

Include CTAs in your visual. The visual you use in the promoted pin should focus on catching the user's attention in a feed full of other appealing pins. Including direct CTAs in your visual will not just take away the visual appeal from your pin, but also get your ad disapproved. Make use of "soft" CTAs (like "Here's how to write a compelling blog post") when promoting a checklist you'll be redirecting them to.

This is only a guess. But Pinterest has indeed confirmed that they are working on various techniques to recognize both the author and the context of any picture. I’m fairly sure Pinterest already has a good idea what any given pictures is about, even if you provided no metadata whatsoever (so any empty description and no url, etc). It might be a good choice to incorporate easily recognizable landmarks, etc into your pin. The simpler, the better.

SocialPilot Lite is free to schedule up to 30 pins and post 10 times per day. Their individual plan is $10 a month and comes with considerably more. You can schedule up to 1000 posts in your queue and post 50 times per day. The content discovery tools are limited while the analytics they provide are non-existent in this basic package. Tailwind and even Buffer have a wider variety of Pinterest automation tools available for this pricing level.
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