Hi Elise – Facebook actually has an app that will let you pull your pins into your Facebook page. It’s acting really wonky for me, though, so I’ll bet they’re still working out the kinks. Here’s the link – http://apps.facebook.com/pinterestapp/ Right now that App page is just re-routing to the Pinterest business page, so there seems to be some sort of issue, but I’ve seen business Pages use it, and it’s cool! Best of luck!


Start by seeding your boards with amazing content. Check out some of the most popular boards for ideas and inspiration. Don’t just focus on your specific niche. Try to find aspects of your niche that apply to the general public. For example, if you are an internet marketing business, you may want to search out and pin marketing infographics or how-to images.

We want people on Pinterest to understand who's promoting content. You can't manage more than one advertiser through a single account or change the advertiser on an account. You also can't create boards for someone else (for example, if you're an agency) and promote stuff from those boards. Instead, you can help someone else promote ads from their own account.
One of the newer concepts to Pinterest is this: Is it better to repin a pin or save directly from a website? I know that’s confusing, so let me break it down. If we want to reshare our content on Pinterest (and you should—read here how I use Tailwind’s SmartLoop to do this), is it better to one, ‘repin’ or save on the Pinterest platform, or two, save from the website using the save tool (or alternatively, schedule a pin on Tailwind).
The creators of this software intended to help you maximize your Pinterest strategy. The Tailwind app works well for bloggers, business owners, social media managers, and beginners alike. It also supports Instagram besides Pinterest. The full list of included tools is too long to fully expand upon. However, here’s a sneak peek of what you can expect to get out of Tailwind.
Pin with your target market in mind. Not just the things that you personally write about, but also lateral content they’re also interested in. This applies not just to what you pin, but how you craft your pin descriptions, board descriptions, and profile. Think of your target market every time you sit down to pin, and you’ll have much greater results than if you only pin according to your own tastes. 
You likely already have a number of Boards on your Business Pinterest Account. If not, you need to stop right now, and create Boards that resonate with both your business and your market. Pin it full of mixed content like products, household tips, lifestyle images and more, all revolving around your Board theme. Post related links back to your blog, too.
This will take you to Business Account Basics. If you scroll down that page, you will see a section entitled Profile. Here, you want to fill out each section, including uploading your logo where it says Picture. You also want to take a few minutes to write a description that is interesting and has a few keywords that people may use when they are searching for what your business does or the type of products your offer.
Since they recognized that college students were the perfect demographic to target, they started to push traffic to their website, focusing on dorm-friendly furnishings and accessories as well as design ideas for small spaces. They used Promoted Pins and keywords like “dorm ideas” and “dorm room organization” to push traffic in the right direction.
For me, it’s more budget friendly when I use Tailwind to pin to my group boards. With Tailwind I pin around 50-100 a day. I only pay $9.99 a month for unlimited pins. With Board Booster, I’d have to pay something like $84/month! So with Board Booster, I only pin 45 pins a day which is only $10/month. It’s just more cost effective for me. It may not be for you. Also, I would change that ratio to more pins of YOUR blog and less of other ones. As for follower growth, I don’t suspect a scheduling tool would help; getting more on group boards yes, making your blog Pinterest friendly and your pins Pin friendly.
I’ve done some thinking this past week, and I really don’t have much of a Pinterest strategy 🙂  But I do think what has worked for me, and would be my best tip, is that almost all my pins are things I truly like and that fit in my niche of homemade and DIY projects.  People who choose to follow me on Pinterest know that they will find pins and more ideas on the same subjects that brought them to my blog.  And if they found me on Pinterest first and have then come over to my blog, they will again find lots of info on the same subject as the type of pins they found interesting. I think this gives some continuity to my brand and continues to give me an authentic voice on my subject.   

One of the newer concepts to Pinterest is this: Is it better to repin a pin or save directly from a website? I know that’s confusing, so let me break it down. If we want to reshare our content on Pinterest (and you should—read here how I use Tailwind’s SmartLoop to do this), is it better to one, ‘repin’ or save on the Pinterest platform, or two, save from the website using the save tool (or alternatively, schedule a pin on Tailwind).
The “People you reach” tab has some extremely valuable information. We always think within our niche, but our followers don’t. They might be interested in travel, DYI home decor, and recipes. It can be a very smart idea to toss in a couple of boards to cover these topics as well. Your end goal should always be engagement, and what better way to engage than with the topics your audience likes?

Health & fitness are one of the most popular content categories on Pinterest. New York studio Kettlebell Kickboxing has built a strong profile on Pinterest because they do a fantastic job describing why potential customers should come in and join them in their profile. They explain their program and why it benefits users in just a few words. Their boards also reinforce this. For example, their Kettlebell Boxing board features articles and resources about why the program works so well.
Content marketing partners help brands develop a strong organic presence on Pinterest. They support the entire Pinterest campaign process, from sourcing content and publishing Pins to managing interactions with Pinners. Content marketing partners have great insight into what kinds of creative work best on Pinterest, so brands that start working with a content marketing partner tend to see a big jump in Pin performance.
Pinterest helps you tell a visual story about your brand. Through pictures and videos, you’re able to show — rather than tell — your audience what you’re about as a company, the things you value, what and who you support, and the types of products and services you sell. Pinterest provides you with a unique and engaging way to introduce your small business to platform users.
Pinterest promoted pins will help you draw attention to a certain pin when you have something special or unique that you want to feature, such as an event, promotion or special article. They will also help you get exposure to people who don’t yet follow your business on Pinterest. Promoted pins are great for seasonal content, time-sensitive material or anything that you need to drive more drive attention to.

Include calls to action in the description. Pinterest doesn’t allow you to use direct calls to action (CTAs) in the promoted pin description, but that doesn’t mean your campaign should lack one. The targeted user needs to know what he is expected to do after seeing the pin. However, it is important to remain contextual and not sound too "salesy." Subtle CTAs such as "Sign up today for a free trial," or "Download this free guide," are things that users will still engage with.

While creating and sharing content for your Pinterest profile and marketing to users, be sure to keep your target audience in mind. Similar to the way you would when creating new products, developing your branding, or posting to other social networks, you want to ensure you’re pushing out content that appeals to your target audience, current customers, and buyer personas on Pinterest.
The last step is to create your first board. To make it easier for users to find your content, such as blogs, special offers, new products, and more — create a business board first and then add relevant Pins. For example, for blog content you’ve posted on your first board, you can then create feature images for each blog post and include a summary of the post in the description to pique user interest.

Claiming your website isn’t difficult, you just need to be able to access and edit your website’s HTML code. There are two ways to claim your site and it’s either by using a meta tag or by uploading an HTML file, the instructions for which can be found on Pinterest’s Claim Your Website help center page. Check out that page for all the instructions you need to claim your website and there’s also platform-specific set up instructions if you need help tailored to your particular ecommerce platform, such as Shopify or BigCommerce.
But Pinterest is different and they follow a different approach. More to the point: My first viral pin, created in April 2015, now has more than 66.000 repins and still sends about 40 people to my site every day (click to see it, even though it looks oddly old-fashioned now). All in all, a bit less than 100.00 visitors. Do you know how many followers I had at that time? Less than 1.000 (around 800ish).
Promoted pins are essentially advertisements that business accounts can pay for to guarantee reach to a certain audience. Any Pinterest business account can purchase a promoted pin, they look like standard pins on the interface and they work like typical PPC ads. One of the main advantages of promoted pins on Pinterest is that they actually get just as much, and sometimes even more, engagement than standard pins. Just because they’re an ad, it doesn’t detract users from engaging with the pin which is good news for brands. Learn more about Pinterest’s promoted pins here and the different audience targeting options here.
Before choosing keywords, do your research. Check keywords using Google’s AdWords Keyword Planner, KeywordSpy or whatever tool you’re comfortable using. Also, do some research on Pinterest. Enter the keywords you’re considering using and see what comes up. People use Pinterest search differently than they use Google and other search engines, so it’s helpful to see the phrases the Pinterest community uses.
6 Ways to Use Pinterest to Promote Your Brand: Have you ignored Pinterest because you think your brand isn’t a fit? Every brand has a story to tell and visual content can help you tell it. Sharing your story with Pinterest’s engaged and active audience via compelling pictures is a great place to start. In this article you’ll see how six brands got creative with Pinterest and gained new followers and engagement.

When you follow and interact with other Pinterest users and their accounts, you’re able to initiate and maintain personal relationships between them and your business. This type of engagement has the potential to make your followers feel a level of loyalty towards your brand that keeps them coming back to your profile for inspiration, ideas, and to buy products.
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