When you follow and interact with other Pinterest users and their accounts, you’re able to initiate and maintain personal relationships between them and your business. This type of engagement has the potential to make your followers feel a level of loyalty towards your brand that keeps them coming back to your profile for inspiration, ideas, and to buy products.
One example of a successful campaign was the one that they ran last year. The furniture retailer realized that back-to-school was one of their key seasons because students are going to college and they have both limited budgets and space. Add that to the fact that about 50% of millennials use Pinterest, and there’s a massive opportunity for selling to college students.
There is one important warning: You will only benefit from such groups if your pins are perfect. These initial repins help your pin appearing in a lot of feeds, but if your pin is not engaging enough, it could actually hurt more than it helps. Why? Because it will have tons of impressions, but maybe no clicks or comments, decreasing the overall engagement numbers.
Collaborative boards can help you reach a new group of pinners and have your pins be seen by more people. You do need to be careful about which boards you join because all the pins will show on your Pinterest presence as well. You can only select the cover photo if you are the owner of the group board. One of my newest collaborative boards is my Pinterest Tips for Success board. All the pinners are fantastic about adding great content and sharing their Pinterest skills.
Now, it’s not a good idea to create Pinterest Boards that are covered in nothing but pins from your own blog. One of the cardinal rules of social media is that you promote others more than yourself. With that said, it certainly behooves you to create Boards related to your content so that you can include your own posts as a small portion of each Board.
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