8. Not installing the “Pin It” button on your browser. While this won’t actually make you look dumb on Pinterest, it’s simply something you’ve got to do! The “pin it” button makes it super easy to curate content from any website. With a quick click, you can pin an image that contains a description and a website link. Simply highlight the text you want as the description before you click “Pin it.”

If you’ve ever wanted a way to boost impulse buys, Buyable Pins are the answer. As users browse through Pinterest, creating boards and getting ideas, they’ll be able to see your product, the price, and purchase it all with a few quick taps or clicks on their mobile device. They don’t even have to re-enter their payment information each time they buy, making the process go quickly—before they get the chance to talk themselves out of it.
BUT, you can only target visitors if you first install the Conversion Tracking code on your site. Before you run screaming from the terror that is “code,” let me assure you – it is very simple, especially if you use WordPress. The code, which you get at Ads > Conversion Tracking, just needs to go on every page of your site in thetag. If you install a plugin such as Insert Headers and Footers, it will take you all of thirty seconds. Naturally, it only begins collecting data on visitors the day it’s installed – so do it now!
Incorporate color contrast. Color contrast is another good practice to incorporate, because it makes your images more visibly appealing and easy to read. Unsurprisingly, it helps users with low visibility be able to make out the images more clearly in many cases. Pinterest officially recommends a contrast ratio of 3.00:1, and released this image to show the importance:
One trick is to use various quotes from your most recent blog post or testimonials about your recent product and link to the website page many different times. You can also Pin the same Pin to different boards. For example, if you write a blog post about buying the best homeowners insurance, that can go on a board that only holds your blog posts, it can also go on a board that talks about financial planning and a board that talks about homeownership.
Ideally, you don’t want to repin pins that deal directly with a topic that you have content about as you want to keep people reading your own content, not a competitor’s. However, you can repin things that might give additional or complementary information. For example, if you write about do-it-yourself home projects often, but you don’t have any content on how to restore old furniture, repinning some pins that are about that, might be helpful to your audience.
Starting a new board is one of the initial steps you take towards building your Pinterest marketing endeavor. And that’s exactly when you should also baseline your analytics.See to it that you determine the most critical metrics for your Pinterest campaign, and use the data to understand what content sources you should continue using and which you should avoid in the future.
Pinterest loves new pins. So, if you could, you should be sharing new pins, preferably all pointing to your website all day. BUT at the same time, you want an engaged audience. The way the smart feed works now, users who repinned one of the pins on your boards are more likely to see more of your pins. So, making use of proven content from other people (by repining) can still help you gain traction.
By adding more dynamic context to your Pinterest ad, rich pins automatically increase traffic to your website or post-click landing page. Not only that, they also sync with your site to provide Pinterest users with the most accurate information. For example, if you’re promoting a product and that product goes on sale on your website, the new price is reflected in the pin as well.
Kristi is a staff writer at Fit Small Business, focusing on marketing for small businesses. Her past experience includes founding, growing and selling her own full-service digital marketing agency. Her expertise includes content marketing, public relations, social media marketing, email marketing as well as event marketing. She has worked with over 500 small businesses & start-ups in her career. When she isn't writing or giving out marketing advice, she can be found planning her next travel adventure or enjoy Florida's beaches.
×