I pin a minimum of 5-10 pins per day. Most of those pins are my own content and are being pinned to my own boards, along with a few group boards. How often you pin per day depends on how much content you are creating. There is no magic number. You have to figure out what works for you. It’s not detrimental to pin 10 times one day and 15 the next day.
Specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-limited. What do you want to achieve and when do you want to achieve it by. Do you want to increase your followers to 100 by the end of the quarter; or do you want a Pinterest ad to generate at least five bathroom tile sales by the end of the month? Being specific gives you a goal to aim for, it focuses your Pinterest marketing tools, and it helps you to monitor (and learn from) your successes.

If your target audience is active on Pinterest, it is definitely worth adding it to your marketing mix. For categories such as food, travel, home decoration, fashion and beauty, Pinterest is an obvious choice. However, it can be made to work for practically any type of business, whether you sell products or services. Many service-based businesses do very well on Pinterest.
Use Pinterest’s embed option to publish pins as content in your blog posts and website pages. Note: As Pinterest is catching on, you may need to tell your users that they need to click on a Pinterest image to get to the original source. When I tried this last week, a reader wrote to me and asked, “Is there more to that Pin thing? Or is it just a pretty image?”
Note: If you’re interested in learning more about what exactly Pinterest does for business, check out their Pinterest for Business article, their article on How to Start Using Pinterest For Your Business which includes sub-sections on how to increase brand awareness with Pinterest marketing, increase website traffic with Pinterest marketing, increase sales with Pinterest and how to increase conversions with Pinterest marketing. They even have a Pinterest Business Best Practice Guide which has a plethora of helpful information and insights for business merchants just getting started on Pinterest.
When I write my Pin descriptions that mimic the language that pinners use when writing notes to themselves, I can increase the engagement on that particular Pin. “LOVE this baked chicken recipe! Pinning for meal planning, healthy eating” is much more inviting than “Check out this baked chicken recipe on my blog! #healthyeating #mealplanning #chickenrecipes. 

Group boards are community boards for invited members to pin on the same topic. The sorts of boards you want to participate should have the following. First, they should be well curated. Next, they should have a good number of active member. Lastly, they need to have moderators who are quick to remove people who violate the spirit of the group board.


You’re welcome Candice. Promoted Pins has now changed quite a bit from when I first wrote this article. They now have two types, cost per engagement (CPE) and cost per click (CPC). You used also be able to find out the search volume of search terms before placing an order. That’s no longer the case. Unfortunately only businesses with a U.S IP address and U.S. credit card are able to use Promoted Pins. It’s not very fair… :(

What’s also unique about Pinterest is that when someone saves a Promoted Pin, other people see it in their feeds as well, which naturally encourages increased engagement and drives additional sales. And, although paid ad campaigns end, the Pins themselves last forever, so your ads will never stop appearing in front of users. Advertisers actually receive an average of 20% more clicks in the month after launching a Promoted Pin campaign.
So, how do you do this? It all starts with creating great content – otherwise known as “pins” – to share on Pinterest. Unlike most social media platforms, success on Pinterest is not dependant on the number of followers your account has. Content on Pinterest has much more reach, and a reach that mimics the algorithm of search engines, so it’s much easier and more seamless for users to see and engage with your content even if they aren’t following you on Pinterest. This means that it’s still possible for brands to get excellent reach and engagement on their Pinterest content even if they don’t have a large following on the platform.
This has a very important implication: The more engaged and loyal your followers are, the faster your pin will take off. Pinterest has said the number of followers did not matter as much as the percental engagement. This, however, also means that users who built their accounts organically (as opposed to follow/unfollow techniques), will have a bigger benefit. 

Hashtags work similarly to keywords in that they help your pins be discoverable by Pinterest users. In this Ultimate Marketer’s Guide to Pinterest, hashtags have been described as being more of a categorical element, and less of a tool to help your content show up in Pinterest search results, so don’t rely on them as heavily as you would keywords to get your content in front of searching users.
I don’t even know how many studies I’ve read on which color performed better than the other and how showing faces was a no-no. Pinterest has confirmed that these are false positives. A beauty pin without a face might be quite ridiculous and even though cold tones are said to perform not as good, a pin about a trip to Antartica would probably look weird with warm colors. If you are not sure about your design, produce alternatives and show them to a control group or just dish them out and focus on the pin that performs best.
It is super important, but at the same time super hard, to think ahead of the current time. 3 years ago, I told everyone to treat Pinterest as a search engine, 2 years ago I reminded people to think mobile first. Some people listened, and others are now facing the issue of having long format pins getting penalized, with bad descriptions not appearing in searches anymore.

You’re always going to find the standard tips you read everywhere: use high-quality images; focus on a long vertical with bright colors; craft a killer headline. But the most surprising piece of advice I have received is to practice skillful social listening on Pinterest. Find the people who have pinned your content by going to Pinterest.com/Source/[YourURL]. Then, leave them a comment thanking them for pinning it. This is so easy, yet it is such a rare occurrence that this simple gesture roots you in the mind of those people who have already encountered and enjoyed your content. This is a powerful way to build a devoted following. 


Hi Elna, this was great info. I’m just starting out using Pinterest for a new blog. I’ve taken a few Pinterest courses that cover the Pinterest side of things, but one thing that I’m a bit confused about is the best placement of the Pinterest image inside my blog post. Some blogs have a featured image at the top with a Pinterest image at the bottom, some just have a huge Pinterest image at the top…so I’m uncertain what is the best thing to do!
You should also repin content that your audience would like to your boards. No matter how much content you create, your audience will want more. Repinning other people’s content helps give that to them. It also helps build rapport with those whose content your repinning to share with your audience. You should view your social media content as being a resource to those that follow you, so give them valuable content, both yours and others.
Pinterest is always testing new algorithms.  A few months ago there was a rumor about the first 5 pins that were better, but that’s no longer the case. Because they started noticing that people were not pinning their 5 best pins first and they shut it down because we were prioritizing bad pins. It all changed within two months which is why the emails you can sign up for are so important.
Ideally, you don’t want to repin pins that deal directly with a topic that you have content about as you want to keep people reading your own content, not a competitor’s. However, you can repin things that might give additional or complementary information. For example, if you write about do-it-yourself home projects often, but you don’t have any content on how to restore old furniture, repinning some pins that are about that, might be helpful to your audience.
Just like other platforms, Pinterest wants you consistently using the platform! As a Pinterest marketer, avoid inconsistency and plopping a bunch of pins on the platform once a week or so. Get into a regular habit of pinning when your audience is using the platform. Using a Pinterest scheduler like Tailwind can help you choose the ‘smart’ times to pin as well as creating a queue so that you don’t have to manually pin, especially if you have difficulty staying consistent. (Psst—want to hear more about Tailwind? Check out my posts here).
Your growth story is very inspiring. You already had over 600 followers though! That’s a lot compared to my measly 30. Do you think your strategies help from the very beginning? I’m probably still too new to contribute to group pages, though I feel I have valuable content. If you have advice for beginners that is different from what you’ve already mentioned, I’d really appreciate hearing it!
Thanks for stopping by and commenting! Yes! Join more group boards! But, I thought you were already on a lot? Oh, maybe that’s FB 🙂 As for the interval function, I had no idea that was an option in Tailwind. I honestly don’t stay in the dashboard of Tailwind so I’m learning as I go. How is that different from scheduling them based on your schedule? Is this so you don’t “spam” a group board? So far I haven’t had that happened even when I was scheduling 200 pins a day. I’ll go over to Lady Boss League and find that post! Thanks
This has a very important implication: The more engaged and loyal your followers are, the faster your pin will take off. Pinterest has said the number of followers did not matter as much as the percental engagement. This, however, also means that users who built their accounts organically (as opposed to follow/unfollow techniques), will have a bigger benefit.
We want people on Pinterest to understand who's promoting content. You can't manage more than one advertiser through a single account or change the advertiser on an account. You also can't create boards for someone else (for example, if you're an agency) and promote stuff from those boards. Instead, you can help someone else promote ads from their own account.
Pinterest is designed to store ideas and inspiration in a way other social media sites aren’t. Users are encouraged to organize what they find into different board names for easy navigation, and most pinners are primarily on Pinterest seeking and saving what they want to see; they generally don’t care if other people see what they've tagged or archived, because it’s just not about generating discussion or exchanging information.
Interest targeting and keyword targeting, however, hold more value than they’re typically given on other platforms. Choosing the right keywords is essential to ensuring your content pops up in the right searches organically, and the same is true for ad targeting. Choosing the right interests will help Pinterest place your ads with users who are most likely to be interested in seeing them when browsing.
Lastly, under the Social Warfare > Advanced tab, you can set a number of global Pinterest options such as telling Social Warfare to use your feature image as a fallback when you don’t add a Pinterest-specific image to a particular post. You can select the option to have your Pinterest-specific post image automatically inserted into your post, or remain hidden and come up when a visitor is using the Pinterest browser extension.
Hello! This blog post was amazing. It was super informative, unlike a lot of articles i read in search of advice on how to start making money on Pinterest, your page actually explains in detail. I run a mommy blog http://www.thelearningmama.com and I also have my Pinterest connected to it, but I’m having a hard time understanding the whole ‘making money with Pinterest’ concept. Im extremely new to the whole idea. Any tips and tricks for people who are just starting would be well appreciated. (:
Don’t make this mistake because pinning everything and anything clutter your pin boards. Disjointed pins can make your boards look unorganized and lack any kind of theme. Pinterest surfers like content to be organized so that they can easily find what they are looking for. Don’t be afraid to pin interesting content your audience would enjoy, but try to keep them connected to your business.
Pin with your target market in mind. Not just the things that you personally write about, but also lateral content they’re also interested in. This applies not just to what you pin, but how you craft your pin descriptions, board descriptions, and profile. Think of your target market every time you sit down to pin, and you’ll have much greater results than if you only pin according to your own tastes. 
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Claiming your website isn’t difficult, you just need to be able to access and edit your website’s HTML code. There are two ways to claim your site and it’s either by using a meta tag or by uploading an HTML file, the instructions for which can be found on Pinterest’s Claim Your Website help center page. Check out that page for all the instructions you need to claim your website and there’s also platform-specific set up instructions if you need help tailored to your particular ecommerce platform, such as Shopify or BigCommerce.
Same applies to on-site content. Google is already displaying tons of content directly in the search, Facebook also has tons of features preventing people from ever leaving their app and Pinterest is already starting with rich pins for recipes. I believe they might try to offer publishers the “opportunity” to create rich content within the Pinterest app. But no visits to your blog means no money, so you will have to look for different traffic sources or different ways to make money.

It is super important, but at the same time super hard, to think ahead of the current time. 3 years ago, I told everyone to treat Pinterest as a search engine, 2 years ago I reminded people to think mobile first. Some people listened, and others are now facing the issue of having long format pins getting penalized, with bad descriptions not appearing in searches anymore.


Your growth story is very inspiring. You already had over 600 followers though! That’s a lot compared to my measly 30. Do you think your strategies help from the very beginning? I’m probably still too new to contribute to group pages, though I feel I have valuable content. If you have advice for beginners that is different from what you’ve already mentioned, I’d really appreciate hearing it!
Social Warfare is one such WordPress plugin that enables the use of social share buttons and Pinterest marketing. Besides being able to use it to set a custom Pinterest image and fallback, their Pro version also has a unique feature called “Pin image for browser extensions”. When turned to the ON position, this toggle adds your custom Pinterest image to the choice of images to Pin when a visitor uses a browser extension to Pin. Social Warfare Pro starts at $29/year for a one website license.
Why do I think so? They already stepped away from displaying repin counts for single pins starting from fall 2017. The official version states that they did not want to give old pins (which went viral in, say, 2014) a visible higher authority and wanted to give new content a chance. But I guess they are also too aware that repins can be easily faked through bots.
Kristi is a staff writer at Fit Small Business, focusing on marketing for small businesses. Her past experience includes founding, growing and selling her own full-service digital marketing agency. Her expertise includes content marketing, public relations, social media marketing, email marketing as well as event marketing. She has worked with over 500 small businesses & start-ups in her career. When she isn't writing or giving out marketing advice, she can be found planning her next travel adventure or enjoy Florida's beaches.
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