Your cover photo is your first impression and the first thing a user sees when they come to your page. Hence, it is important to make it attractive. Also, Pinterest allows you to choose which pin to use as your cover image. Therefore, don’t forget to optimize the Cover photos on Pinterest of each board. Lastly, choose a high-quality image that is attractive and bright for your cover photo.

Yeah, Anshul, I gotta admit – I didn’t see the point of Pinterest for a long time. I thought it was another pared-down Facebook knock-off. But then I started using it and can really see all the different ways it can be used for marketing. Plus, it’s now driving over HALF the traffic to my site, and I’m just getting started! I saw an immediate boost to traffic and mailing list signups. It’s been a huge boon for me.


Pinterest images should be long and narrow to take up the maximum amount of visual space and get noticed! Look at your favorite pins and see what the images have in common so you see what types of images are repinned and shared. I create images that are up to 735 pixels by 1102 pixels. This creates an engaging invitation to repin your pinned article.
Patricia, those are great tips too. I really wish the folks at Pinterest would get back to me about its commercial use. Maybe their initial thoughts were not for business use and now that it’s taken off as it has, they may be rethinking the rules but it would be great to have clarification because I’ll be out there creating my own business board if I feel comfortable knowing it’s in keeping with their terms!
Even though Pinterest is a visual search engine, descriptions are what help users find what they’re looking for when they search for specific content on Pinterest using keywords. When creating descriptions for your pins, besides using keywords that users are searching for (which you can discover by using a tool like KWFinder) make sure that every pin’s description is evergreen so it has the greatest amount of lasting potential.
One trick is to use various quotes from your most recent blog post or testimonials about your recent product and link to the website page many different times. You can also Pin the same Pin to different boards. For example, if you write a blog post about buying the best homeowners insurance, that can go on a board that only holds your blog posts, it can also go on a board that talks about financial planning and a board that talks about homeownership.

I’m so new to all of this. I’m a wedding music looking to engage with brides and grooms. On my website I’ve included a few blog posts so far, but absolutely need to make the content better and with more images. I’m just at a loss sometimes for inspiration on what to write about. On my business Pinterest account, I’ve included boards to help inspire brides and grooms. Pretty much the only ones that redirect back to my website/blog are on my Texas Harmony board. What in the world should I do to change the number of conversions from people clicking to actually visiting my blog for wedding ideas? And do you have articles on brainstorming what to blog about??? I know there are tons of pins out there but I’m pinned out for the night. Lol


First, do some searching on Pinterest so that you understand how Pinterest searching works. Then, take note of which results show up first and how the Pinterest feed organizes the pins and boards. Notice which keywords are suggested as being together automatically and which of these keywords are relevant to your pins. You want to do these searches on both desktop and mobile devices so that you understand what looks different on each device.
You should also repin content that your audience would like to your boards. No matter how much content you create, your audience will want more. Repinning other people’s content helps give that to them. It also helps build rapport with those whose content your repinning to share with your audience. You should view your social media content as being a resource to those that follow you, so give them valuable content, both yours and others.

Pin with your target market in mind. Not just the things that you personally write about, but also lateral content they’re also interested in. This applies not just to what you pin, but how you craft your pin descriptions, board descriptions, and profile. Think of your target market every time you sit down to pin, and you’ll have much greater results than if you only pin according to your own tastes. 
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
This is only a guess. But Pinterest has indeed confirmed that they are working on various techniques to recognize both the author and the context of any picture. I’m fairly sure Pinterest already has a good idea what any given pictures is about, even if you provided no metadata whatsoever (so any empty description and no url, etc). It might be a good choice to incorporate easily recognizable landmarks, etc into your pin. The simpler, the better.

Eighty percent of Pinners use the Pinterest app to access the network on mobile devices, so images should be optimized for a small screen. Vertical images are your best bet, since they give you more real estate to work with. The image ratio can be up to 1:2.8, but 2:3 is ideal,which means your image should be 600 x 900 pixels. If your image is taller than 1560 pixels, it will get cut off.
I check their Blog, Pinterest for Business page, and Pinterest for Developers page frequently. I’m not a programmer, so sometimes I need help with the technical language. I love listening to Cynthia Sanchez’s Oh So Pinteresting podcast for assistance in this area. She interviews interesting and knowledgeable individuals who keep me current! I appreciate her tips too. The action steps she suggests are achievable and make a difference in my Pinning!
Very interesting blogpost, I am following this forum with great interest as a Marketing Proffessional and private fan of pinterest for creative and lifestyle inspiration. Any thoughts on local vs global business and how to gear for repins in a more narrow contexts – Not all Businesses are geard for global sales eventhough global branding is always of value!
First, complete your profile describing your business including relevant keywords that users will use to search. Next, you are going to want to upload a good logo as your profile picture. In addition, create minimum 10-12 boards and pin at least 9 pins on each board. As a result, this gives the board an active appearance and people will be more apt to explore your board.
Chrome Extension - Using the OneUp Chrome extension, you can easily schedule many images at once from any website, such as sunsets for example. You can choose which images from the website you want to post to social media, bulk update or individually update the descriptions and links for each post, then schedule them to be posted with a set interval (such as every 60 minutes), or choose custom dates and times for all of them.
Use Pinterest to show the trends or patterns happening within your industry and what you’re doing to make strides based on these trends. Promoting industry trends in Pinterest gives your audience different perspectives into their current strategies and what you can do to help them. For example, IBM has a board called “Tech in Healthcare” that shows how different types of data helps them to make better decisions.

Your anchor board is a board where you only pin your own content and they all lead people to your blog posts, website or landing pages. (I suggest creating this even if you haven’t created your own pins to go in it yet. We will work on that in the next step.) You should name it something obvious such as “Best of BLOG NAME” so people know that you pin your own content in there.
PinPinterest is exactly what it sounds like. It’s purely for Pinterest automation. You can set up your account to automatically pin, follow, unfollow, and like. They offer a no-subscription pricing setup. Just select the number of days that you’d like to pay for in advance, and you will not be charged any kind of recurring fee. Regardless of what pricing plan you choose, all of PinPinterest’s plans work out for less than $1 per day.
Like Pinterest discusses in their Tips for Creating Customer Growth on Pinterest article, “too often, online marketing tactics focus on customers who already know what they want to buy—instead of expanding their reach to also include people earlier in their shopping journey,” which is an extremely important perspective to keep in mind when creating content for your Pinterest marketing strategy. To grow your reach on Pinterest, you need to focus on the early steps in a user’s shopping journey and that starts by telling a story and creating a need for the user to make them want to purchase your product to fulfill that need.
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