Pinterest is the ultimate visual search engine and the world’s catalog of ideas, and it’s the only social media platform that enables users to plan for the future rather than share the present or reflect on the past. With a Pinterest for business account, brands can create and manage a Pinterest marketing strategy that boosts brand awareness and drives traffic and conversions to their website. In this article, we discuss in detail what Pinterest marketing offers brands in terms of marketing power and what a Pinterest for business account can do for a business and their bottom line.
Join Pinterest group Boards. Group boards are shared boards where many different users are invited to contribute. They are differentiated from personal boards by the use of a special group icon. Pinners who follow the group Board show up as followers of the owner only, but all Pins to the group Board, from all contributors, can show up in the home feed of every Pinner who follows it. Think of the implications of joining a group Board with a contributor who has over 100,000 followers! Use a tool like PinGroupie to determine which group Boards you should seek membership to.

This makes me sad. Months ago when I first signed on to Pinterest, it was a wonderland full of awesome ideas, cool crafts, and amazing recipes shared. I logged on to Pinterest daily, sometimes a couple times a day. Now every time I sign on, it’s nothing but a giant ad board. Having to weed through everyone’s ads and marketing of themselves just to find those same cool crafts and recipes isn’t worth the effort anymore, and now I rarely use Pinterest. Think about that. The more companies use Pinterest to pimp themselves out, the faster it’s going to fade, because the original users are becoming more like me.


Pinterest is a highly reputable business, and use of their website is unlikely to give you a virus. However, it is possible to click on pins that lead to sites hosting malicious content, such as viruses or malware. Pinterest does not monitor the integrity of linked websites, so always be careful when leaving the main site. When using browser extensions to increase the site’s functionality, only download and install extensions from sites you trust.
Pinterest can definitely be a useful tool for growing your business or getting exposure for new products. The capabilities of this kind of curatorial site allow you to showcase the taste of your brand in a whole new way, and definitely speak to a specific and powerful demographic. When done right, Pinterest is a great way to enhance your online presence, so have at with the pins!
Anything that might interest someone who is interested in blue stilettos is likely fair game. Pinterest is fairly lenient here because of the way keyword targeting works, but if you get too out there, say, targeting, “DIY planters,” your Pin will be rejected. Pinterest suggests that 100 keywords is the sweet spot, but you can get results with fewer.
Pins targeted by keyword only often show up in the home feed, too! Knowing that “keyword” targeting has more to do with the Pinner’s overall Pinterest behavior than their in-the-moment search really frees you up to go broad with your keywords. In fact, if you keep too tight with your keyword targeting, you may find it hard to get the impressions you need in order to evaluate your campaign.

Content marketing partners help brands develop a strong organic presence on Pinterest. They support the entire Pinterest campaign process, from sourcing content and publishing Pins to managing interactions with Pinners. Content marketing partners have great insight into what kinds of creative work best on Pinterest, so brands that start working with a content marketing partner tend to see a big jump in Pin performance.


You likely already have a number of Boards on your Business Pinterest Account. If not, you need to stop right now, and create Boards that resonate with both your business and your market. Pin it full of mixed content like products, household tips, lifestyle images and more, all revolving around your Board theme. Post related links back to your blog, too.

Hi! Great post! I’ve only just gotten back to Pinterest after ignoring it (I know, I know) and just started using Tailwind. What do you mean about dripping your posts over the course of a week or month? What exactly is the strategy there, and how do you do it? Also, how do you get 100 recommended optimal times with the free tailwind? They only offered me three optimal times to start. Did you just add to that general time period manually, or am I missing something? Thanks!
To promote your Pinterest account and content, you should share your Pins, images, and videos in other areas to improve your chances of being seen and followed. For example, you can claim your business’ Pinterest account on Instagram, Etsy, and YouTube so your followers can easily learn about the other platforms you’re on and how they can view more of your content. Additionally, claiming your account will provide access to analytics and data on all of these Pins so you can see the other networks your audience is most interested in.
Your growth story is very inspiring. You already had over 600 followers though! That’s a lot compared to my measly 30. Do you think your strategies help from the very beginning? I’m probably still too new to contribute to group pages, though I feel I have valuable content. If you have advice for beginners that is different from what you’ve already mentioned, I’d really appreciate hearing it!
The benefits for marketers are huge. And here’s one of the biggest and best parts of Buyable Pins: Pinterest doesn’t take a cut of your sales. There’s no commission. You keep every dollar you make on the sales you get from Buyable Pins. Though that has the potential to change down the line if Buyable Pins see a lot of success, for now marketers are using them with no drawbacks.
Business-to-consumer (B2C) companies in general have a much easier time on Pinterest than business-to-business (B2B) companies, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible for the latter to get traction on the platform. Ultimately, whether or not Pinterest is a good fit for your business will depend heavily on whether or not your target audience overlaps with their existing user base.

And why not? Pinterest currently has 250 million monthly active users and according to Pew Research, a whopping 29% of U.S. adults use Pinterest.When compared to other social media platforms, Pinterest is definitely on the smaller side. But what makes it an interesting option is the fact that people using the site are actually engaged with it. Which means, you have a higher chance of getting people to click-through to your site from Pinterest, than say, Twitter.

@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right.
Pinterest images should be long and narrow to take up the maximum amount of visual space and get noticed! Look at your favorite pins and see what the images have in common so you see what types of images are repinned and shared. I create images that are up to 735 pixels by 1102 pixels. This creates an engaging invitation to repin your pinned article.

Monetization: Currently, Pinterest is not a very successful business. Unlike Facebook, they are not reaping billions each year. At one point they need to cash in and this will probably lead to less traffic to your website. Why is this important? I am not entirely sure you should lay all your eggs in the Pinterest basket anymore. Try to diversify (SEO or be an early discover for a new medium). It’s just a hunch, but traffic potential from Pinterest might just be about to see its peak.
When you follow and interact with other Pinterest users and their accounts, you’re able to initiate and maintain personal relationships between them and your business. This type of engagement has the potential to make your followers feel a level of loyalty towards your brand that keeps them coming back to your profile for inspiration, ideas, and to buy products.
Pinning from websites means you’re adding fresh content into the mix. This kind of rings a bell within the Pinterest hamster cage and says “Woah, hold on a sec, here’s someone providing something new. We like them!”. If the images you’re pinning are high quality, look amazing and link to a valuable source, Pinterest will in turn see you as a valuable user. 
So, please whatever you do, don’t just post product photos. Do you remember that study done by The University of Minnesota? Well, diversity of pin was the 8th most important factor when users were deciding whether to follow an account. So, throw in some other boards that give your followers added value in order to avoid coming off as overly salesy.

Disclaimer: We spend hours researching and writing our articles and strive to provide accurate, up-to-date content. However, our research is meant to aid your own, and we are not acting as licensed professionals. We recommend that you consult with your own lawyer, accountant, or other licensed professional for relevant business decisions. Click here to see our full disclaimer.

If you already have a Pinterest business account, make note of the traffic that Pinterest is currently sending you. You should track progress on a regular basis - it tells you if your marketing efforts are paying off, or not. This also applies to newbies on Pinterest - even though you do not have any historical data to benchmark against, monthly tracking will be helpful to monitor future progress.
Create highly pinnable graphics – “long and lean” as I call them.  Some of my simplest projects have become very popular on Pinterest because I created highly pinnable collages that show multiple images from the same project.  Pinterest loves vertical images, so every post should have a pinnable vertical image that includes a high-quality image, the title of the post, and your blog name or URL in a watermark.  It’s worth the bit of extra time it takes to create these images for the return on investment – increased blog traffic!
I find that one mistake people often make is to leave out keywords on their boards. Board names are searchable (though significantly less than actual pins). It’s vital to choose board names with a strong SEO. For instance, ‘yummmy’ is not a good board name. It has no searchable context. Choose something like, ‘dessert recipes’ or even more specific, ‘pumpkin desserts’ instead.
So, how do you do this? It all starts with creating great content – otherwise known as “pins” – to share on Pinterest. Unlike most social media platforms, success on Pinterest is not dependant on the number of followers your account has. Content on Pinterest has much more reach, and a reach that mimics the algorithm of search engines, so it’s much easier and more seamless for users to see and engage with your content even if they aren’t following you on Pinterest. This means that it’s still possible for brands to get excellent reach and engagement on their Pinterest content even if they don’t have a large following on the platform.
Thank you for this wonderful posting, very informative. I love Pinterest. It allows you to see so much more than you would ever have time to discover on your own. I am a primitive artist and have an Etsy shop, blog and belong to 2 different selling groups. I recently created a group board and have invited other artisans to post their goodes to the board, in a very short period of time our followers have doubled, we see our items being repinned and it is becoming a viable source of traffic to our sites. I also have a wonderful recipe (Yums I Want to Make) and I’ve invited my daughter and SIL to contribute…omg I gain weight everytime I look at the board. I’ve traveled to many sites from these pins and discovered some wonderful people.
A great post! This is Misato from https://fitwirr.com/. When I initially started, I grew my followers the very similar ways as yours – group boards, long images, Tailwind, etc.. One thing I really appreciated Tailwind was they give you stats on each boards’ ROI. The boards with most followers, activities, etc.. were all there, and it helped me narrow my focus and really understand what people are interested in and wanted to see more of.

You’re welcome Candice. Promoted Pins has now changed quite a bit from when I first wrote this article. They now have two types, cost per engagement (CPE) and cost per click (CPC). You used also be able to find out the search volume of search terms before placing an order. That’s no longer the case. Unfortunately only businesses with a U.S IP address and U.S. credit card are able to use Promoted Pins. It’s not very fair… :(
I have already covered a few blogs you must read for Pinterest tips as a bonus in my article 30 Pinterest Accounts and Boards You Must Follow for Marketing Tips. Since then I have learnt about other blogs that regularly cover Pinterest tips, so here’s a separate article that is dedicated to the great blogs that cover the best Pinterest tips. Check them out below and read their tips to improve your Pinterest knowledge…
By tracking and understanding Pinners’ evolving interests, tastes, and preferences, the Pinterest Taste Graph offers an expansive collection of 5,000 interests and categories in the Pinterest Ads Manager. This allows advertisers to reach more specific, niche, obscure audiences. The more Pinners search, save, and click, the more refined the targeting (because Pinterest can more easily suggest new categories and interests), and the more accurate the data.
Like Pinterest discusses in their Tips for Creating Customer Growth on Pinterest article, “too often, online marketing tactics focus on customers who already know what they want to buy—instead of expanding their reach to also include people earlier in their shopping journey,” which is an extremely important perspective to keep in mind when creating content for your Pinterest marketing strategy. To grow your reach on Pinterest, you need to focus on the early steps in a user’s shopping journey and that starts by telling a story and creating a need for the user to make them want to purchase your product to fulfill that need.
×