Pinterest also offers Actalike audience targeting, which is similar to Facebook’s Lookalike feature and Google’s Similar feature. A major difference, though, is that Actalike only requires an audience size of 100 users to create the audience, while Facebook and Google require much larger audiences. Also, with layering and variance of 1% to 10%, your Actalike audience closely resembles your pre-existing audience list, with similar engagement activity. This allows for personalized targeting of new, niche audiences.


Pinterest automation software can make your life a lot easier if you’re a blogger or business owner who uses Pinterest in their digital marketing strategy. By putting repetitive Pinterest tasks on autopilot, you’ll be able to focus on creating high-quality content and pins rather than spending time on mundane tasks. Daily tasks like pinning and following other Pinterest accounts are important to stay on top of. Unfortunately, they take significant time to complete. This list will detail the best Pinterest automation software solutions currently available. We’ll begin with the most popular solution and end with the lesser-known options.
If you already have a Pinterest business account, make note of the traffic that Pinterest is currently sending you. You should track progress on a regular basis - it tells you if your marketing efforts are paying off, or not. This also applies to newbies on Pinterest - even though you do not have any historical data to benchmark against, monthly tracking will be helpful to monitor future progress.
Good points, Beth. I also think it’s important, as I pointed out in my blog post, that if a company is using Pinterest they actually lead it back to content, whether it’s a product or service on their website or content on their blog. It’s a perfect example for companies to implement a content marketing strategy and promote their brand through providing useful information (coupled with eye-catching images) and becoming a trusted resource. It’s so much less “in your face” and lessens the risk of potential customers getting annoyed with you spamming Pinterest with promos or pointless contests.
You should not pin your own content always. This rule of thumb is important because you want to keep your content fresh and dynamic to keep your readers reading. Rather than just pinning your own content, pin content related to your business, interesting images, quotes and mix in your products and articles. Create a different board that cover your targeted customer’s interests. This will also allow you to feature your best products beside them.
Beth, fab tips! Instantly it struck me that photographers like myself, need to rethink how we present our online content so we can have our work shown without feeling marketers are using it to pretty their brand image and we receive little $ benefit down the line. Photographers spend not only their time — but thousands of dollars a year on equipment, software, make-up crew, props and workshops to generate a single image. A $6k lens an artist buys or rents is done to define eyes and make skin come alive. So instead of whining…
Users will never even see your image if you don’t have the right keywords and copy to tell them (and the Pinterest algorithm) what you have in store. Pin descriptions, board descriptions, profile descriptions, and board titles should all creatively include keywords for that very reason—but avoid writing copy that looks and feels like low-effort keyword stuffing.

If you use the Pinterest tag or send us mobile app activity, you must tell your website and app visitors that their information will be shared with third parties for online behavioral advertising, and that they can opt out of online behavioral advertising through their Pinterest personalization settings, the AdChoices website optout.aboutads.info (if you use the Pinterest tag), or their mobile ad identifier settings (if you share app activity data with us).


The Pinterest search bar is great tool to find keywords. To better understand how it works, type a few keywords in the Pinterest search bar. Take note of the suggested keywords (see example below). Do a similar search for categories and keep drilling down the list of categories you are presented with. This will give you a good idea of the most frequently used keywords.

Your cover photo is your first impression and the first thing a user sees when they come to your page. Hence, it is important to make it attractive. Also, Pinterest allows you to choose which pin to use as your cover image. Therefore, don’t forget to optimize the Cover photos on Pinterest of each board. Lastly, choose a high-quality image that is attractive and bright for your cover photo.
Hello! This blog post was amazing. It was super informative, unlike a lot of articles i read in search of advice on how to start making money on Pinterest, your page actually explains in detail. I run a mommy blog http://www.thelearningmama.com and I also have my Pinterest connected to it, but I’m having a hard time understanding the whole ‘making money with Pinterest’ concept. Im extremely new to the whole idea. Any tips and tricks for people who are just starting would be well appreciated. (:

Pinterest promoted pins will help you draw attention to a certain pin when you have something special or unique that you want to feature, such as an event, promotion or special article. They will also help you get exposure to people who don’t yet follow your business on Pinterest. Promoted pins are great for seasonal content, time-sensitive material or anything that you need to drive more drive attention to.


I think some people on Pinterest are upset about the idea of marketers coming in a “ruining” Pinterest. I have gotten some flack about this, as well. I think people responded the same way when businesses moved into the Facebook space, too. At any rate, you didn’t do anything wrong! And if people follow the first rule of Copyblogger, no “ruining” of anything will occur!
Hi Elna, this was great info. I’m just starting out using Pinterest for a new blog. I’ve taken a few Pinterest courses that cover the Pinterest side of things, but one thing that I’m a bit confused about is the best placement of the Pinterest image inside my blog post. Some blogs have a featured image at the top with a Pinterest image at the bottom, some just have a huge Pinterest image at the top…so I’m uncertain what is the best thing to do!
To dive a little deeper. Pinterest group boards are boards where there are multiple pinners, with a single owner (either you or someone else). So you can create one, and invite people to pin – which alleviates the pinning workload, but comes with some responsibility. The easier version is getting on someone else’s board. A great tool for this is Pin Groupie which can help you find relevant and active boards. This way you can spread your pins (and others, don’t just pin your own) even wider, by leveraging audiences you had no access to before. Cool huh!
Pin with your target market in mind. Not just the things that you personally write about, but also lateral content they’re also interested in. This applies not just to what you pin, but how you craft your pin descriptions, board descriptions, and profile. Think of your target market every time you sit down to pin, and you’ll have much greater results than if you only pin according to your own tastes. 
You can now confirm your Instagram, YouTube and Etsy account on Pinterest. Why does this matter? It matters in two ways! One, when people pin your content from those platforms TO Pinterest, your account will get attributed with engagement. Your impressions, visibility and engagement will go up. I’ve noticed, after confirming these platforms with my client’s accounts, that fans were pinning their items on Pinterest all along.
The number one Pinterest tip I can give you is to be true to your brand in your Pinnable images. Create a certain recognizable style. Always use the same font, logo or watermark, and other elements when you add an image to a blog post. Over time people will start to recognize you for your pictures on Pinterest. Those pictures give them an incentive to take a look on your blog to see if you’ve updated lately. That means more traffic for you, all by simply being true to your brand. 
If you’re familiar with Adobe Photoshop, it’s another tool you can use to create Pinterest content. If you want to use Photoshop to create your Pinterest images but need a crash course in how to actually use Photoshop, we recommend checking out Skillshare’s photoshop classes, a few of the best ones you can see curated in our 40+ Best Skillshare Classes for Business article.
The content saved by users is distributed to a wider audience by the Pinterest algorithm in people’s home feed and search results. As a business, your aim is to make your content inspirational and discoverable, so that it gets seen, saved (i.e. shared) and clicked as often as possible. Helpful content, keywords, and high-quality images are essential ingredients for success on Pinterest.
Don’t make this mistake because pinning everything and anything clutter your pin boards. Disjointed pins can make your boards look unorganized and lack any kind of theme. Pinterest surfers like content to be organized so that they can easily find what they are looking for. Don’t be afraid to pin interesting content your audience would enjoy, but try to keep them connected to your business.
Pinterest has grown very quickly attracting both everyday users and businesses. All of them take part sharing great content in the form of images which makes it a very enjoyable and addictive experience. People have been able to do this with ease because there are several wonderful bloggers who share very helpful tips which teach everything from how to navigate the site to using it to promote your business.

One of the newer concepts to Pinterest is this: Is it better to repin a pin or save directly from a website? I know that’s confusing, so let me break it down. If we want to reshare our content on Pinterest (and you should—read here how I use Tailwind’s SmartLoop to do this), is it better to one, ‘repin’ or save on the Pinterest platform, or two, save from the website using the save tool (or alternatively, schedule a pin on Tailwind).
I really, really like Pinterest, but I just read an article about Pinterest’s scary terms of service! It’s making me think about removing all the content I have on there. And I’m wondering how you or I can ethically go on promoting them? I had to go look up the terms of service myself and was apalled that by posting your own original content you are giving Cold Brew Labs irrevocable rights to your artwork! Here’s an exact copy and paste “By making available any Member Content through the Site, Application or Services, you hereby grant to Cold Brew Labs a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free license, with the right to sublicense, to use, copy, adapt, modify, distribute, license, sell, transfer, publicly display, publicly perform, transmit, stream, broadcast, access, view, and otherwise exploit …..”
When you follow and interact with other Pinterest users and their accounts, you’re able to initiate and maintain personal relationships between them and your business. This type of engagement has the potential to make your followers feel a level of loyalty towards your brand that keeps them coming back to your profile for inspiration, ideas, and to buy products.
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