Hashtags work similarly to keywords in that they help your pins be discoverable by Pinterest users. In this Ultimate Marketer’s Guide to Pinterest, hashtags have been described as being more of a categorical element, and less of a tool to help your content show up in Pinterest search results, so don’t rely on them as heavily as you would keywords to get your content in front of searching users.
So, how do you do this? It all starts with creating great content – otherwise known as “pins” – to share on Pinterest. Unlike most social media platforms, success on Pinterest is not dependant on the number of followers your account has. Content on Pinterest has much more reach, and a reach that mimics the algorithm of search engines, so it’s much easier and more seamless for users to see and engage with your content even if they aren’t following you on Pinterest. This means that it’s still possible for brands to get excellent reach and engagement on their Pinterest content even if they don’t have a large following on the platform.
If you don’t want to spend the next few months in trial and error, I highly recommend investing in a good Pinterest course. Not only will that polish any mistakes that you might be making with your Pinterest account, but it will help you form a bullet proof strategy! Start by taking the Pinterest Primer free course here and do your research online.
With your Pinterest for business account, you can view analytics like what pins people are liking on your profile and what they save from your website, and you can learn more about what content users would like to see more of from your profile. You can also discover your audience metrics including their demographic information and what their other interests are.
I pin a minimum of 5-10 pins per day. Most of those pins are my own content and are being pinned to my own boards, along with a few group boards. How often you pin per day depends on how much content you are creating. There is no magic number. You have to figure out what works for you. It’s not detrimental to pin 10 times one day and 15 the next day.
Our mission at Pinterest is to bring everyone the inspiration to create the life they love. We believe promoted content can play a big role in helping people create a life they love, which is why we want ads to be some of the best stuff you see on Pinterest. If you follow these guidelines, you’ll be all set for promoting great content on Pinterest.

The problem is, that people don’t get to pass it up. If they have chosen to use Flickr to display their work, for example, someone can go “pin” their image without the artist ever knowing, until they find it pinned all over the place and hosted on blogs. When licensing work, they may even choose to pass up a group they disagree with, say, AARP for example, yet that group can create a board to promote their work and go out and grab any image they like from the net. What then? What makes “pinning” inherently different than taking any image from anywhere and putting it on your website?

Similar to other advertising channels, Pinterest has its own Tag, which is a piece of code that is applied to your website. With the Tag, you will be able to better measure the effectiveness of your campaigns, understand customer paths from engagements to conversions, define audiences for remarketing and track a number of events such as page visits, category views, searches, cart additions, checkouts, video views, signups and leads.


You’re welcome Candice. Promoted Pins has now changed quite a bit from when I first wrote this article. They now have two types, cost per engagement (CPE) and cost per click (CPC). You used also be able to find out the search volume of search terms before placing an order. That’s no longer the case. Unfortunately only businesses with a U.S IP address and U.S. credit card are able to use Promoted Pins. It’s not very fair… :(

Collaborative boards can help you reach a new group of pinners and have your pins be seen by more people. You do need to be careful about which boards you join because all the pins will show on your Pinterest presence as well. You can only select the cover photo if you are the owner of the group board. One of my newest collaborative boards is my Pinterest Tips for Success board. All the pinners are fantastic about adding great content and sharing their Pinterest skills.
Our mission at Pinterest is to bring everyone the inspiration to create the life they love. We believe promoted content can play a big role in helping people create a life they love, which is why we want ads to be some of the best stuff you see on Pinterest. If you follow these guidelines, you’ll be all set for promoting great content on Pinterest.

For me, it’s more budget friendly when I use Tailwind to pin to my group boards. With Tailwind I pin around 50-100 a day. I only pay $9.99 a month for unlimited pins. With Board Booster, I’d have to pay something like $84/month! So with Board Booster, I only pin 45 pins a day which is only $10/month. It’s just more cost effective for me. It may not be for you. Also, I would change that ratio to more pins of YOUR blog and less of other ones. As for follower growth, I don’t suspect a scheduling tool would help; getting more on group boards yes, making your blog Pinterest friendly and your pins Pin friendly.

If you go the video route, make sure to keep it short, hook viewers within the first few seconds, and optimize it to play without sound. Also make sure your logo appears at the beginning or throughout the entirety of your video, so people know what they’re watching—and who it comes from. Branded content is actionable and trustworthy, so tends to perform well on Pinterest.


I find that one mistake people often make is to leave out keywords on their boards. Board names are searchable (though significantly less than actual pins). It’s vital to choose board names with a strong SEO. For instance, ‘yummmy’ is not a good board name. It has no searchable context. Choose something like, ‘dessert recipes’ or even more specific, ‘pumpkin desserts’ instead.
I’ve done some thinking this past week, and I really don’t have much of a Pinterest strategy 🙂  But I do think what has worked for me, and would be my best tip, is that almost all my pins are things I truly like and that fit in my niche of homemade and DIY projects.  People who choose to follow me on Pinterest know that they will find pins and more ideas on the same subjects that brought them to my blog.  And if they found me on Pinterest first and have then come over to my blog, they will again find lots of info on the same subject as the type of pins they found interesting. I think this gives some continuity to my brand and continues to give me an authentic voice on my subject.  

Good points, Beth. I also think it’s important, as I pointed out in my blog post, that if a company is using Pinterest they actually lead it back to content, whether it’s a product or service on their website or content on their blog. It’s a perfect example for companies to implement a content marketing strategy and promote their brand through providing useful information (coupled with eye-catching images) and becoming a trusted resource. It’s so much less “in your face” and lessens the risk of potential customers getting annoyed with you spamming Pinterest with promos or pointless contests.


If you've been using Pinterest lately, you might have noticed three kinds of pins: those from people you follow, those that are suggested for you, and promoted pins, also known as Pinterest Ads. Over the last five years, as the CEO of AutomateAds.com, I've managed and scaled tens of millions of dollars in ad budgets across Facebook, Google Adwords, Instagram and more. I've been testing Pinterest's promoted pins product for well over a year now, and I believe it's a massive opportunity for brands to drive sales and leads.
Think of Pinterest as a bookmarking tool that people use to plan their lives. People typically save - or “pin” in Pinterest jargon - images they find on the web or on Pinterest itself to different boards (collections of images around a specific topic). The pictures are clickable and link back to a webpage where further information about the image topic can be found.
Right now, Pinterest has only confirmed they are using hashtags for certain specific searches. These hashtag searches (say “Bali”) are, allegedly, shown in a chronological order. Meaning fresh pins with hashtags (up to 20, but I wouldn’t overdo it to keep your descriptions tidy) are more likely to appear in those searches and thus able to create the coveted engagement. Pinterest has said they are working on new uses for hashtags so better not skip them (even though old guides will tell you to do so!)

Ideally, you don’t want to repin pins that deal directly with a topic that you have content about as you want to keep people reading your own content, not a competitor’s. However, you can repin things that might give additional or complementary information. For example, if you write about do-it-yourself home projects often, but you don’t have any content on how to restore old furniture, repinning some pins that are about that, might be helpful to your audience.


They don’t want that. They already started crawling websites, but to be on the safe side, I’d recommend creating new pins for old posts once in a while. To be quite truthful with you: My first pins sucked, my layouts have vastly improved and there is still room for more improvement. I’m sure you will have (or had) a similar journey, and why not present every blog post in the best possible light at any given time, eh?
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