Follow these Pinterest marketing tactics to develop your blog. On your blog, place striking images with your blog posts, add easy engagement mechanics like the Pinterest Pin It and Follow Me buttons. On Pinterest, reach out to like-minded pinners and be sure to add calls to action on the blog posts you pin on Pinterest. These are a great start for increasing your website traffic and visibility.
I have a site selling purebred and designer puppies. I’ve really been using Pinterest as a way to share great photos of puppies, but after reading this article, I will have a more focused and targeted approach. The puppies get lots of attention as it is, just trying to figure out how to convert that into puppy adoptions now. Thanks for the good read!
One of the things I hear over and over again from Pinterest users–individuals and businesses–is that we don’t want Pinterest turning into another sales pitch ghetto as users plug their MLM products or Etsy sites or corporate product lines. The primary reason that Pinterest is so successful is its organic and cooperative nature. There are, as you listed, many ways (at least 54 it would seem) to promote a business or brand without resorting to carnival shilling and Web 1.0 scorched earth tactics.
Pinterest is a great way for your small business to display your work and showcase your expertise in your industry. Examples include Pins with images and videos of your work, infographics, data visualizations, and blog posts. Due to the fact you might not be a recognized brand yet, doing this is important. That’s because as your business grows and you become more well-known, you’ll be more likely to be recognized as an industry leader and a business with helpful and applicable content for audience members.

In Tailwind, on the side bar go down to “Board List” I think it’s called. From here you create a new list and just add all the group boards in a similar category. So, if you want to break up blog growth into social media, blog traffic, make money, freelance then you would put the appropriate group boards (and yours too) under those corresponding lists.
Thank you for this wonderful posting, very informative. I love Pinterest. It allows you to see so much more than you would ever have time to discover on your own. I am a primitive artist and have an Etsy shop, blog and belong to 2 different selling groups. I recently created a group board and have invited other artisans to post their goodes to the board, in a very short period of time our followers have doubled, we see our items being repinned and it is becoming a viable source of traffic to our sites. I also have a wonderful recipe (Yums I Want to Make) and I’ve invited my daughter and SIL to contribute…omg I gain weight everytime I look at the board. I’ve traveled to many sites from these pins and discovered some wonderful people.
This makes me sad. Months ago when I first signed on to Pinterest, it was a wonderland full of awesome ideas, cool crafts, and amazing recipes shared. I logged on to Pinterest daily, sometimes a couple times a day. Now every time I sign on, it’s nothing but a giant ad board. Having to weed through everyone’s ads and marketing of themselves just to find those same cool crafts and recipes isn’t worth the effort anymore, and now I rarely use Pinterest. Think about that. The more companies use Pinterest to pimp themselves out, the faster it’s going to fade, because the original users are becoming more like me.
6. Mixing your personal interest boards with business-related boards. There are actually a few instances where I’ve seen this done successfully, but overall this tactic doesn’t work. Are your customers actually interested in the recipes you’re considering trying or the table settings you want at your fantasy wedding? Probably not. Keep your business account for your business and your personal account for your personal interests.
To execute a winning Pinterest marketing strategy, you need to be pinning consistently to Pinterest. It’s recommended to pin between 11-20 times per day which may seem like a lot, but as outlined in this Ultimate Pinterest Marketing Guide, 80% of the content can be content you re-pin from other users on Pinterest (and thus save to your own Pinterest boards) while only 20% of it should be original content.
Before choosing keywords, do your research. Check keywords using Google’s AdWords Keyword Planner, KeywordSpy or whatever tool you’re comfortable using. Also, do some research on Pinterest. Enter the keywords you’re considering using and see what comes up. People use Pinterest search differently than they use Google and other search engines, so it’s helpful to see the phrases the Pinterest community uses.
No one likes to follow or connect with you if you have an incomplete profile or empty board. Some marketers only create one or two pins and do not login regularly enough. As a result, this will affect the marketing plan of your brand. So, if you don’t have enough content to pin on board regularly, you can use a secret board and keep pinning to it. When you have enough pins you can share them one by one according to your requirements.

If you’re familiar with Adobe Photoshop, it’s another tool you can use to create Pinterest content. If you want to use Photoshop to create your Pinterest images but need a crash course in how to actually use Photoshop, we recommend checking out Skillshare’s photoshop classes, a few of the best ones you can see curated in our 40+ Best Skillshare Classes for Business article.


I feel like Pinterest runs the risk of becoming cluttered if we encourage businesses to use it when it might not be the best channel for them. Part of content marketing is making sure your content fits your channel, and filling up Pinterest with promotional noise is likely to turn users off and could ruin the service altogether. I wrote a piece on that today on the D Custom blog…http://www.dcustom.com/three-things-youre-doing-wrong-on-pinterest/
Hello! This blog post was amazing. It was super informative, unlike a lot of articles i read in search of advice on how to start making money on Pinterest, your page actually explains in detail. I run a mommy blog http://www.thelearningmama.com and I also have my Pinterest connected to it, but I’m having a hard time understanding the whole ‘making money with Pinterest’ concept. Im extremely new to the whole idea. Any tips and tricks for people who are just starting would be well appreciated. (:
With 200 million monthly users, Pinterest may not be a social media behemoth like Facebook, but it’s an important social platform with deep penetration in valuable demographics. Half of all U.S. millennials use Pinterest, for instance. But it’s not just young people saving their ideas on the network: 68 percent of U.S. women between the ages of 25 and 54 use Pinterest, too. And while it’s true that the network does have more female users than male, 40 percent of new users are men.
This checklist serves as a lead magnet to attract the right people to sign up for her mailing list. She included a sign-up box for this checklist in relevant blog posts and regularly published these articles on Pinterest. Besides organic pinning, she also promoted some of the pins to a more closely targeted audience through a paid Pinterest ad campaign.
This will take you to Business Account Basics. If you scroll down that page, you will see a section entitled Profile. Here, you want to fill out each section, including uploading your logo where it says Picture. You also want to take a few minutes to write a description that is interesting and has a few keywords that people may use when they are searching for what your business does or the type of products your offer.
Businesses which focus on highly visual advertising, such as interior designers, clothing companies, restaurants and many others can benefit in particular by effective Pinterest marketing. With 72% of Pinterest’s audience being women, it can be an exceedingly valuable tool for targeting specific niches. Besides Pinterest allows you to interact with your customers in ways that other social media platforms don’t.
They don’t want that. They already started crawling websites, but to be on the safe side, I’d recommend creating new pins for old posts once in a while. To be quite truthful with you: My first pins sucked, my layouts have vastly improved and there is still room for more improvement. I’m sure you will have (or had) a similar journey, and why not present every blog post in the best possible light at any given time, eh?
Your cover photo is your first impression and the first thing a user sees when they come to your page. Hence, it is important to make it attractive. Also, Pinterest allows you to choose which pin to use as your cover image. Therefore, don’t forget to optimize the Cover photos on Pinterest of each board. Lastly, choose a high-quality image that is attractive and bright for your cover photo.

Pinterest images should be long and narrow to take up the maximum amount of visual space and get noticed! Look at your favorite pins and see what the images have in common so you see what types of images are repinned and shared. I create images that are up to 735 pixels by 1102 pixels. This creates an engaging invitation to repin your pinned article.
They don’t want that. They already started crawling websites, but to be on the safe side, I’d recommend creating new pins for old posts once in a while. To be quite truthful with you: My first pins sucked, my layouts have vastly improved and there is still room for more improvement. I’m sure you will have (or had) a similar journey, and why not present every blog post in the best possible light at any given time, eh?
Include calls to action in the description. Pinterest doesn’t allow you to use direct calls to action (CTAs) in the promoted pin description, but that doesn’t mean your campaign should lack one. The targeted user needs to know what he is expected to do after seeing the pin. However, it is important to remain contextual and not sound too "salesy." Subtle CTAs such as "Sign up today for a free trial," or "Download this free guide," are things that users will still engage with.
Hashtags work similarly to keywords in that they help your pins be discoverable by Pinterest users. In this Ultimate Marketer’s Guide to Pinterest, hashtags have been described as being more of a categorical element, and less of a tool to help your content show up in Pinterest search results, so don’t rely on them as heavily as you would keywords to get your content in front of searching users.
If you use the Pinterest tag or send us mobile app activity, you must tell your website and app visitors that their information will be shared with third parties for online behavioral advertising, and that they can opt out of online behavioral advertising through their Pinterest personalization settings, the AdChoices website optout.aboutads.info (if you use the Pinterest tag), or their mobile ad identifier settings (if you share app activity data with us).

Business-to-consumer (B2C) companies in general have a much easier time on Pinterest than business-to-business (B2B) companies, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible for the latter to get traction on the platform. Ultimately, whether or not Pinterest is a good fit for your business will depend heavily on whether or not your target audience overlaps with their existing user base.


I pin a minimum of 5-10 pins per day. Most of those pins are my own content and are being pinned to my own boards, along with a few group boards. How often you pin per day depends on how much content you are creating. There is no magic number. You have to figure out what works for you. It’s not detrimental to pin 10 times one day and 15 the next day.
Your growth story is very inspiring. You already had over 600 followers though! That’s a lot compared to my measly 30. Do you think your strategies help from the very beginning? I’m probably still too new to contribute to group pages, though I feel I have valuable content. If you have advice for beginners that is different from what you’ve already mentioned, I’d really appreciate hearing it!
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