For me, it’s more budget friendly when I use Tailwind to pin to my group boards. With Tailwind I pin around 50-100 a day. I only pay $9.99 a month for unlimited pins. With Board Booster, I’d have to pay something like $84/month! So with Board Booster, I only pin 45 pins a day which is only $10/month. It’s just more cost effective for me. It may not be for you. Also, I would change that ratio to more pins of YOUR blog and less of other ones. As for follower growth, I don’t suspect a scheduling tool would help; getting more on group boards yes, making your blog Pinterest friendly and your pins Pin friendly.
Pinterest loves new pins. So, if you could, you should be sharing new pins, preferably all pointing to your website all day. BUT at the same time, you want an engaged audience. The way the smart feed works now, users who repinned one of the pins on your boards are more likely to see more of your pins. So, making use of proven content from other people (by repining) can still help you gain traction.
Just like other platforms, Pinterest wants you consistently using the platform! As a Pinterest marketer, avoid inconsistency and plopping a bunch of pins on the platform once a week or so. Get into a regular habit of pinning when your audience is using the platform. Using a Pinterest scheduler like Tailwind can help you choose the ‘smart’ times to pin as well as creating a queue so that you don’t have to manually pin, especially if you have difficulty staying consistent. (Psst—want to hear more about Tailwind? Check out my posts here).
Interest targeting and keyword targeting, however, hold more value than they’re typically given on other platforms. Choosing the right keywords is essential to ensuring your content pops up in the right searches organically, and the same is true for ad targeting. Choosing the right interests will help Pinterest place your ads with users who are most likely to be interested in seeing them when browsing.
Content marketing partners help brands develop a strong organic presence on Pinterest. They support the entire Pinterest campaign process, from sourcing content and publishing Pins to managing interactions with Pinners. Content marketing partners have great insight into what kinds of creative work best on Pinterest, so brands that start working with a content marketing partner tend to see a big jump in Pin performance.

With Pinterest, you can easily review what your competitors — and the companies in your industry that are more established than yours — are doing. This will allow you to discover which tactics they’re using on the platform and see what’s working for their audience members. You can also look at the content your audience Pins as well as who they’re following and interacting with.
There are two types of Save Buttons: Automatic Buttons which show the Pinterest Save Button icon on your images automatically so users know they can save that image to Pinterest, and there’s also the Hover Buttons which show the Pinterest Save Button icon on your images when users’ cursors hover over your images, so they’re a little more discreet but still signal to your visitors that the image can be saved to their Pinterest boards.

Pinterest boards group together content with the same theme. For example, DAVIDsTEA — which has corporate partnerships — categorizes its boards based on seasonal teas, cooking with tea, tea-infused cocktails, and more. DAVIDsTEA’s boards are carefully pieced together to include the types of information their audience will enjoy. In addition to creating awesome boards, be sure to link all the content in your boards to your website or a landing page — within reason, of course — so you’re reiterating your messaging, as well as your organization.
First, complete your profile describing your business including relevant keywords that users will use to search. Next, you are going to want to upload a good logo as your profile picture. In addition, create minimum 10-12 boards and pin at least 9 pins on each board. As a result, this gives the board an active appearance and people will be more apt to explore your board.
I pin ten times per day, 7 of my own pins and 3 of other peoples. I aim to pin my most popular content first, found in my Google or Pinterest analytics. Then I pin seasonal content, and then lastly, my new content. I primarily focus on personal boards instead of group boards and I check my Tailwind stats one time per month to inform me on how it’s working. I check my analytics to see how my pins are performing there as well.
The end goal of using Pinterest for business is to get users to engage with and take action on your pins. Engagement can mean anything from clicking on a pin to see it in detail, saving a pin to one of their boards, sharing a pin with a peer or even trying a pin idea out for themselves. All of this helps to create brand awareness and puts users in the very beginning stages of your sales funnel.

In the last podcast episode, we dove into how to make Pinterest work for your business. If you’re struggling to find your groove while creating your profile, boards, or pins, go back and listen to that episode. That will give you a really good foundation to jump into this week’s episode, where we’ll focus on how to create a Pinterest marketing strategy.


To promote your Pinterest account and content, you should share your Pins, images, and videos in other areas to improve your chances of being seen and followed. For example, you can claim your business’ Pinterest account on Instagram, Etsy, and YouTube so your followers can easily learn about the other platforms you’re on and how they can view more of your content. Additionally, claiming your account will provide access to analytics and data on all of these Pins so you can see the other networks your audience is most interested in.
Similar to other advertising channels, Pinterest has its own Tag, which is a piece of code that is applied to your website. With the Tag, you will be able to better measure the effectiveness of your campaigns, understand customer paths from engagements to conversions, define audiences for remarketing and track a number of events such as page visits, category views, searches, cart additions, checkouts, video views, signups and leads.
If your target audience is active on Pinterest, it is definitely worth adding it to your marketing mix. For categories such as food, travel, home decoration, fashion and beauty, Pinterest is an obvious choice. However, it can be made to work for practically any type of business, whether you sell products or services. Many service-based businesses do very well on Pinterest.
Pinterest helps you tell a visual story about your brand. Through pictures and videos, you’re able to show — rather than tell — your audience what you’re about as a company, the things you value, what and who you support, and the types of products and services you sell. Pinterest provides you with a unique and engaging way to introduce your small business to platform users.

Pin too little and people will lose interest in you; pin too much and you risk being unfollowed. Pinterest suggests 10-12 Pins per day, in order to appear more often in your follower’s feed and search results. Of course, this also depends upon the time of day you are pinning. Peak time is between 8-11pm on weekends. These are great numbers and times to start with and to later tweak according to the analytical insights on the Pinterest marketing tools you’ve used (discussed later).
This makes me sad. Months ago when I first signed on to Pinterest, it was a wonderland full of awesome ideas, cool crafts, and amazing recipes shared. I logged on to Pinterest daily, sometimes a couple times a day. Now every time I sign on, it’s nothing but a giant ad board. Having to weed through everyone’s ads and marketing of themselves just to find those same cool crafts and recipes isn’t worth the effort anymore, and now I rarely use Pinterest. Think about that. The more companies use Pinterest to pimp themselves out, the faster it’s going to fade, because the original users are becoming more like me.
You may notice when browsing the web now that there are various Pin This–type tools throughout online content. These Pinterest social sharing buttons are found everywhere from the beginning of a post to the images throughout the post to the end of the post next to comment and other social share buttons. In a post on the blog, Resourceful Mommy, hovering over each image provides readers with a Pin It option.
Kristi is a staff writer at Fit Small Business, focusing on marketing for small businesses. Her past experience includes founding, growing and selling her own full-service digital marketing agency. Her expertise includes content marketing, public relations, social media marketing, email marketing as well as event marketing. She has worked with over 500 small businesses & start-ups in her career. When she isn't writing or giving out marketing advice, she can be found planning her next travel adventure or enjoy Florida's beaches.
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