I think some people on Pinterest are upset about the idea of marketers coming in a “ruining” Pinterest. I have gotten some flack about this, as well. I think people responded the same way when businesses moved into the Facebook space, too. At any rate, you didn’t do anything wrong! And if people follow the first rule of Copyblogger, no “ruining” of anything will occur!

Hashtags on Pinterest are used to help users identify Pins and boards about a specific topic they’re searching. When users click on a hashtag you include on a Pins, they’re brought to a page in which they can view all content ever posted on the platform tagged with that specific hashtag. You should add hashtags to your Pins, boards, and promoted content (if you have any) to ensure the greatest amount of visibility.
The boundary between commercial and personal is always fuzzy when you’re talking about entrepreneurs. Founders of travel companies are travel geeks. Founders of graphic design agencies are design geeks. Founders of clothing companies are fashion geeks. When you’re sharing something you’re genuinely geeky about that also has to do with how you make a living, the lines get blurry.
Adding a few words of text to your images can help give an immediate idea of what the linked content is all about. For example, food-related Pins that include a short text call-out get 23 percent more clickthroughs and 31 percent more saves. But don’t go overboard, since Pinterest specifically recommends avoiding images that are too busy. This Pin from Kraft Foods uses just the right amount of text:

Similar to other advertising channels, Pinterest has its own Tag, which is a piece of code that is applied to your website. With the Tag, you will be able to better measure the effectiveness of your campaigns, understand customer paths from engagements to conversions, define audiences for remarketing and track a number of events such as page visits, category views, searches, cart additions, checkouts, video views, signups and leads.


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Business-to-consumer (B2C) companies in general have a much easier time on Pinterest than business-to-business (B2B) companies, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible for the latter to get traction on the platform. Ultimately, whether or not Pinterest is a good fit for your business will depend heavily on whether or not your target audience overlaps with their existing user base.

The last step is to create your first board. To make it easier for users to find your content, such as blogs, special offers, new products, and more — create a business board first and then add relevant Pins. For example, for blog content you’ve posted on your first board, you can then create feature images for each blog post and include a summary of the post in the description to pique user interest.
Note: If you’re interested in learning more about what exactly Pinterest does for business, check out their Pinterest for Business article, their article on How to Start Using Pinterest For Your Business which includes sub-sections on how to increase brand awareness with Pinterest marketing, increase website traffic with Pinterest marketing, increase sales with Pinterest and how to increase conversions with Pinterest marketing. They even have a Pinterest Business Best Practice Guide which has a plethora of helpful information and insights for business merchants just getting started on Pinterest.
As a general rule, you want your boards to be 50 percent about your business and 50 percent about the interests of your audience that tie back to your business. By pinning your audience interest as well as your own content, you will entice them to engage with you more on Pinterest. When they engage with you more, Pinterest will show users your content more frequently in their feed.
When you follow and interact with other Pinterest users and their accounts, you’re able to initiate and maintain personal relationships between them and your business. This type of engagement has the potential to make your followers feel a level of loyalty towards your brand that keeps them coming back to your profile for inspiration, ideas, and to buy products.
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