My wife got me into Pinterest which I initially just wrote off as “another” social media site. Great article Beth. I will have to follow you and see how to use all these techniques first-hand. It seems like the web in general is evolving into a more picture oriented communication medium. Pinterest is the future, here now. I can see Google having a picture based search only option in the not too distant future.

Just a heads up to Beth and everyone else at CopyBlogger. I pinned this post to my board “Craft Advice and Blogs” to save it to read again later and though it was repinned 30-ish times, 3 people were upset about it and someone claimed they reported me for pinning it. I don’t know what the hell they’re upset about??? Have I done something terribly wrong?
Opt for a content-based approach. I remember seeing a recipe for a breakfast parfait and saving it, only to realize later on that the recipe was from Fage, a Greek yogurt brand, and it featured a specific flavor of yogurt none of their competitors had. It was a smart move, because content like recipes and DIY tutorials perform great on Pinterest. If you can feature your products in a similar way, this is a good strategy to try, especially for brand awareness campaigns.
Hi! Great post! I’ve only just gotten back to Pinterest after ignoring it (I know, I know) and just started using Tailwind. What do you mean about dripping your posts over the course of a week or month? What exactly is the strategy there, and how do you do it? Also, how do you get 100 recommended optimal times with the free tailwind? They only offered me three optimal times to start. Did you just add to that general time period manually, or am I missing something? Thanks!
The Pinterest search bar is great tool to find keywords. To better understand how it works, type a few keywords in the Pinterest search bar. Take note of the suggested keywords (see example below). Do a similar search for categories and keep drilling down the list of categories you are presented with. This will give you a good idea of the most frequently used keywords.
Lastly, I think when you are speaking to those new to Pinterest and especially to marketers, you need to remind them of the stated Pin Etiquette: “Avoid Self Promotion. Pinterest is designed to curate and share things you love. If there is a photo or project you’re proud of, pin away! However, try not to use Pinterest purely as a tool for self-promotion.” I just pinned my own screen shot image, but marked it as such to start a board on Pinterest tips.

No matter what you’re advertising — and no matter what platform you’re advertising on — it’s essential to include a call-to-action to encourage your audience to take the next step. By simply adding “Sign up”, “Learn more”, or “Visit site” to your Pinterest ad, you can inspire users to take action. By doing so you can increase conversions by up to 80%!
My best Pinterest tip is to pin like your followers. Your followers do not pin from just 10:00-10:30 am every single weekday. Sure, you can schedule your pins out, but remember that your perfect follower (and possible blog reader) sleeps, eats, works, takes care of children, has doctor’s appointments, etc. They don’t have a schedule of when they pin, they pin when they can. Since I’ve started using Pinterest as just a regular person vs. blogger trying to drive traffic, I’ve seen my number of followers increase quickly. Of course, my tip may not work for everyone, but it doesn’t hurt to play with your pinning strategy to gauge results. Take a strategy and try it for 2 weeks, analyze, tweak, and happy pinning!
I started using interval because I was hugely paranoid about spamming group boards (it took me ages to even get up the courage to post anything to the first one, lol) and mainly because I thought it would be good to drip the content out over time rather than in one big rush. Initially I thought that I could just keep each pin cycling through my group board list indefinitely, but that doesn’t take into account that as I make more pins, they start to stack and I might overwhelm the boards.
Take some time to search around Pinterest to get an idea of what types of images draw your eye to them most quickly. Are there certain colors that grab your attention? Do you tend to click on images with superimposed headings? Take some time to play around with your blog post images and notice which articles are receiving the most interaction from the Pinterest community.

For me, it’s more budget friendly when I use Tailwind to pin to my group boards. With Tailwind I pin around 50-100 a day. I only pay $9.99 a month for unlimited pins. With Board Booster, I’d have to pay something like $84/month! So with Board Booster, I only pin 45 pins a day which is only $10/month. It’s just more cost effective for me. It may not be for you. Also, I would change that ratio to more pins of YOUR blog and less of other ones. As for follower growth, I don’t suspect a scheduling tool would help; getting more on group boards yes, making your blog Pinterest friendly and your pins Pin friendly.
Many people have the misconception that Pinterest is this happy ‘soft’ social media site for DIY moms and brides, where everything is always all perfect and dandy. While this assumption isn’t necessarily wrong, Pinterest often flies under the radar as a practical marketing tool, to the detriment of those who fail to invest time in a Pinterest marketing strategy.
The pin/save button appears directly on your website’s product pages, making it easy for browsers to pin (and share) a link to their own Boards. 5x more easy to be precise. Immediately you’re making it simple for potential customers to engage with you and you’re gaining knowledge of who has pinned content from your website; providing you with an opportunity to engage right back.
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