SocialPilot Lite is free to schedule up to 30 pins and post 10 times per day. Their individual plan is $10 a month and comes with considerably more. You can schedule up to 1000 posts in your queue and post 50 times per day. The content discovery tools are limited while the analytics they provide are non-existent in this basic package. Tailwind and even Buffer have a wider variety of Pinterest automation tools available for this pricing level.
The content saved by users is distributed to a wider audience by the Pinterest algorithm in people’s home feed and search results. As a business, your aim is to make your content inspirational and discoverable, so that it gets seen, saved (i.e. shared) and clicked as often as possible. Helpful content, keywords, and high-quality images are essential ingredients for success on Pinterest.
Followers on Pinterest matter because it allows Pinterest to monitor your content. If your followers see your content and they like it, Pinterest will know which of your pins to show more.  But if your followers don’t engage with your content, for example spam accounts, then Pinterest thinks the content isn’t that good and they will not push it. So it doesn’t matter if you have 1 follower or 100,000 followers, you want them to be liking your stuff.  
In September 2018, Pinterest reported that 250 million people used the social platform every month, which is 25% more than the number of people who used Pinterest in September 2017. This year-over-year growth is astounding since Pinterest is a lot younger than other social platforms (launched in 2010). Pinterest has become another vital channel to reach prospects or current customers and be a touch point in your consumer marketing funnel.
I’ve done some thinking this past week, and I really don’t have much of a Pinterest strategy 🙂  But I do think what has worked for me, and would be my best tip, is that almost all my pins are things I truly like and that fit in my niche of homemade and DIY projects.  People who choose to follow me on Pinterest know that they will find pins and more ideas on the same subjects that brought them to my blog.  And if they found me on Pinterest first and have then come over to my blog, they will again find lots of info on the same subject as the type of pins they found interesting. I think this gives some continuity to my brand and continues to give me an authentic voice on my subject.  
In the last podcast episode, we dove into how to make Pinterest work for your business. If you’re struggling to find your groove while creating your profile, boards, or pins, go back and listen to that episode. That will give you a really good foundation to jump into this week’s episode, where we’ll focus on how to create a Pinterest marketing strategy.

Similar to other social networks, Pinterest contains a plethora of images and videos. Not only do you want to ensure you’re posting images and videos that will help you promote your brand and market your products/ services, but you’ll also want to ensure they stand out against all of the others on the platform. Otherwise, why would a user choose to follow you over your competition?
Pinterest is no social media channel, but a visual search engine. I’ve lost count how often I repeated this mantra in the last 3 years and recently even Pinterest officials are using similar terms. In the early days of Pinterest, people would follow other users and see what they liked in their feeds. But these days an increasing number of people will use it to search for recipes, wedding inspiration or travel guides. They are searching.

I’ve joined Pinterest and hooked it up to my business site. So far I haven’t really noticed any great increase in my site’s traffic due to Pinterest. But I agree…Pinterest is becoming huge and I think finally surpassed LinkedIn as one of the top three. Might as well play along! 🙂 Good tips though…I certainly started looking through my pins to see if and where I could I apply some of your advice.

I find that one mistake people often make is to leave out keywords on their boards. Board names are searchable (though significantly less than actual pins). It’s vital to choose board names with a strong SEO. For instance, ‘yummmy’ is not a good board name. It has no searchable context. Choose something like, ‘dessert recipes’ or even more specific, ‘pumpkin desserts’ instead.
The next part of this step is to confirm your website. In the first step, you were asked to insert your website into your profile details. While that shows up publicly on your account (and might even send blog traffic your way from people that found you and loved what you pin), Pinterest needs to know that you actually own the account for them to give you sensitive details about it.

Thank you so much for sharing. I started my blog a few months ago and it has been a slow process for me to setup and grow my blog. I haven’t had the traffic needed so I read your article to see if you had any tips. You have definitely added insight so I will try to implement tailwind to more followers. I am so excited and ready to see my blog grow and my followers increase.
Something I’ve been struggling to figure out is how to pin many pins a day, while keeping a good chunk of them as pins from my own content. I only publish new content once a week. Let’s say I want to post 50% my content and 50% of others’, I would only be pinning two pins per day (one for my new post and one of someone else). Am I supposed to be pinning older content that’s already in those boards? If so, how often should I be doing that? I just don’t understand how people say to pin X number of pins per day and X amount should be your own content. Help! Thanks, Rachel

Monetization: Currently, Pinterest is not a very successful business. Unlike Facebook, they are not reaping billions each year. At one point they need to cash in and this will probably lead to less traffic to your website. Why is this important? I am not entirely sure you should lay all your eggs in the Pinterest basket anymore. Try to diversify (SEO or be an early discover for a new medium). It’s just a hunch, but traffic potential from Pinterest might just be about to see its peak.
To promote your Pinterest account and content, you should share your Pins, images, and videos in other areas to improve your chances of being seen and followed. For example, you can claim your business’ Pinterest account on Instagram, Etsy, and YouTube so your followers can easily learn about the other platforms you’re on and how they can view more of your content. Additionally, claiming your account will provide access to analytics and data on all of these Pins so you can see the other networks your audience is most interested in.
If your target audience is active on Pinterest, it is definitely worth adding it to your marketing mix. For categories such as food, travel, home decoration, fashion and beauty, Pinterest is an obvious choice. However, it can be made to work for practically any type of business, whether you sell products or services. Many service-based businesses do very well on Pinterest.

I pin a minimum of 5-10 pins per day. Most of those pins are my own content and are being pinned to my own boards, along with a few group boards. How often you pin per day depends on how much content you are creating. There is no magic number. You have to figure out what works for you. It’s not detrimental to pin 10 times one day and 15 the next day.
One trick is to use various quotes from your most recent blog post or testimonials about your recent product and link to the website page many different times. You can also Pin the same Pin to different boards. For example, if you write a blog post about buying the best homeowners insurance, that can go on a board that only holds your blog posts, it can also go on a board that talks about financial planning and a board that talks about homeownership.

I wouldn’t worry too much about not getting a response. I sometimes don’t respond to my emails; I just let people in the group. Make sure to check your Pinterest notifications! I would also try lower tiered group boards with a lower reach to get in. These group owners are more than happy to let you in because they are trying to grow your followers.
SocialPilot Lite is free to schedule up to 30 pins and post 10 times per day. Their individual plan is $10 a month and comes with considerably more. You can schedule up to 1000 posts in your queue and post 50 times per day. The content discovery tools are limited while the analytics they provide are non-existent in this basic package. Tailwind and even Buffer have a wider variety of Pinterest automation tools available for this pricing level.
When I stopped following people and just focused on pinning my follower rate increased significantly. I get anywhere from 1 to 10 new followers a day when before I was lucky to get a few a week. After the death of BB I focused on manually pinning so I could better learn Pinterest. We are going on vacation soon and I think I might need to join TW for fear that the traffic I took so long to build will die. I also hope that it will give me the boost I need to finally hit 25k sessions and join Mediavine. Thanks for the tips! I’ll be implementing them as well 🙂
Incorporate color contrast. Color contrast is another good practice to incorporate, because it makes your images more visibly appealing and easy to read. Unsurprisingly, it helps users with low visibility be able to make out the images more clearly in many cases. Pinterest officially recommends a contrast ratio of 3.00:1, and released this image to show the importance:
Establish relationships with other bloggers, influencers and pinners. Instagram isn’t the only place where you might want to work with influencers. For example, Target has worked with top Pinterest accounts Oh Joy, Wit & Delight, and Poppytalk. Pinterest is currently looking into creating a tool that makes it easier for brands to work with influencers (Instagram has already done this). Working with influencers might involve creating community Boards, giving influencers products to artfully style and Pin to. If you pursue this type of influencer/Pinterest marketing, you might also ask the influencer to curate content from other creators (kind of like a style guide).
It’s hard to choose just one, but I think my best Pinterest tip would be to take the time to really understand how Pinterest works. Just like any form of social media, you’ll see best results if you understand what Pinterest is and how to best use it for YOUR brand. Do your research, experiment with different ideas, pay attention to the analytics, tweak your strategy, and above all have fun with it! 
It is more effective to Pin multiple times a day than to Pin all at once. This is because the more consistently you Pin, the more Pinterest’s Smart Feed will show your pins. Your goal is to Pin five times per day. You can work up to this number by starting with two pins a day of your content and two repins. However, to be most effective you want to work up to pinning and repinning 10 times a day.
Shopify users – this is really simple to do. Select the Add HTML tag option, copy the full meta tag, head over to your Shopify admin > online store > themes, on the appropriate theme click actions > edit code, click on the layout section, click theme.liquid and then paste the full meta tag onto a blank line directly under the opening tag. And then save. (More detailed instructions here).
Users will never even see your image if you don’t have the right keywords and copy to tell them (and the Pinterest algorithm) what you have in store. Pin descriptions, board descriptions, profile descriptions, and board titles should all creatively include keywords for that very reason—but avoid writing copy that looks and feels like low-effort keyword stuffing.
There is one important warning: You will only benefit from such groups if your pins are perfect. These initial repins help your pin appearing in a lot of feeds, but if your pin is not engaging enough, it could actually hurt more than it helps. Why? Because it will have tons of impressions, but maybe no clicks or comments, decreasing the overall engagement numbers.

In short, Pinterest is the perfect place to start your sales funnel from. With Pinterest pins, you can build awareness around your brand and products, develop consumer interest, and increase traffic, but then you can also use Pinterest to boost in-store and online sales and influence users to take actions like sign-up to, purchase and install products.
If you need a powerful Pinterest tool that truly digs deep and allows you to get the most out of your Pinterest account, Tailwind is probably a tool you’ll want to take a serious look at. Tailwind offers a free trial for your first 100 pins. This will help you get a feel for how things work. After your trial runs out, you can switch to the basic subscription of $9.99 a month.
Pinterest recommends to add multiple dots on the pin and it will perform better. Tag 3 products or more for a Shop The Look pin because then  3 pictures of the products will show at the bottom.  Items under $50 are the sweet spot for Shop The Look as not everyone can afford more expensive items. Or if you have an item that is very expensive, be sure to include comparable items that are less expensive.  
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!

As a general rule, you want your boards to be 50 percent about your business and 50 percent about the interests of your audience that tie back to your business. By pinning your audience interest as well as your own content, you will entice them to engage with you more on Pinterest. When they engage with you more, Pinterest will show users your content more frequently in their feed.

Your cover photo is your first impression and the first thing a user sees when they come to your page. Hence, it is important to make it attractive. Also, Pinterest allows you to choose which pin to use as your cover image. Therefore, don’t forget to optimize the Cover photos on Pinterest of each board. Lastly, choose a high-quality image that is attractive and bright for your cover photo.


Continue to bid aggressively. The good thing about Pinterest advertising is that you only pay for the number of clicks you get. Thus, marketers should continuously measure performance and adjust their bid prices accordingly to maximize results. While the initial bid could be high, once the ad gains momentum, you'll see a drop in bid price, especially with pins that receive a high level of organic engagement and interaction. The idea is to keep testing your ads and bid aggressively to optimize your clicks and conversions to meet your goals.
Pinterest is a goldmine when it comes to marketing. But finding success with Pinterest marketing goes beyond just having a great profile image and company description.Making Pinterest marketing work boils down to having a clear strategy that resonates with your business goals. Because ultimately, building a strong presence on Pinterest is only possible when you’re headed in the right direction.
If your business is focused on producing amazing content, that you would like to get more visibility than what a Facebook post or a few tweets can provide, Pinterest is a wonderful platform to solve that. Because of Pinterest’s search engine, you can see a blog post or article resurface as a popular Pin that is bringing traffic to your website, long after you first pinned it. Many users have seen traffic from a blog post for several years after first posting it.
6. Mixing your personal interest boards with business-related boards. There are actually a few instances where I’ve seen this done successfully, but overall this tactic doesn’t work. Are your customers actually interested in the recipes you’re considering trying or the table settings you want at your fantasy wedding? Probably not. Keep your business account for your business and your personal account for your personal interests.
I’m not an alarmist. I like safe, simple rules and guidelines that stay consistent over time. I don’t think Pinterest is any different. Over time, Pinterest marketing has evolved (hey, hashtags) but the foundation of keywords and vertical images has not. Human interaction with Pinterest has changed. In this post, I’ll be sharing the main principles to a solid Pinterest marketing strategy.
Thanks for all the tips here. I’ve been growing on pinterest, too, but still need to accelerate things. I’ve been finding it challenging to get into more of the top decor boards (I do flooring) as many are closed to new pinners). I’ve also been collaborating with a friend of mine who has a larger following and more group boards, and we are helping each other.
Create Boards that tell a story or create a lifestyle – don’t just create product Boards. 72% say the platform helps them to find ideas for everyday life: Use insights (below) to understand what stories appeal to your target audience and use this to fuel your Board ideas and give your followers the inspiration they’re after. Stay true to your brand, get creative and have fun.
I really, really like Pinterest, but I just read an article about Pinterest’s scary terms of service! It’s making me think about removing all the content I have on there. And I’m wondering how you or I can ethically go on promoting them? I had to go look up the terms of service myself and was apalled that by posting your own original content you are giving Cold Brew Labs irrevocable rights to your artwork! Here’s an exact copy and paste “By making available any Member Content through the Site, Application or Services, you hereby grant to Cold Brew Labs a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free license, with the right to sublicense, to use, copy, adapt, modify, distribute, license, sell, transfer, publicly display, publicly perform, transmit, stream, broadcast, access, view, and otherwise exploit …..”
I feel like Pinterest runs the risk of becoming cluttered if we encourage businesses to use it when it might not be the best channel for them. Part of content marketing is making sure your content fits your channel, and filling up Pinterest with promotional noise is likely to turn users off and could ruin the service altogether. I wrote a piece on that today on the D Custom blog…http://www.dcustom.com/three-things-youre-doing-wrong-on-pinterest/
Hi Elise – Facebook actually has an app that will let you pull your pins into your Facebook page. It’s acting really wonky for me, though, so I’ll bet they’re still working out the kinks. Here’s the link – http://apps.facebook.com/pinterestapp/ Right now that App page is just re-routing to the Pinterest business page, so there seems to be some sort of issue, but I’ve seen business Pages use it, and it’s cool! Best of luck!
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