While this is a comprehensive list I am pretty disappointed that there is absolutely no mention of the requirement to respect copyright and ask people first. I don’t have time to read all your posts re Pinterest. ….as you brushed off the person who asked about this. However…..I have a strong aversion to people not being informed clearly of the need to respect copyright. Especially since you have made it clear, and I know others are already using their boards commercially to make money from technically stolen prints.Pinterest has yet to have a TOC and system that ensures copyright is protected. They have tinkered but not fixed.People offering advise in my opinion have a duty to push for a respect of copyright.Links back….no not after the first repin it would seem, when Pinterest then divert the links to make them money.
Once you hit the Claim button, you are given instructions on how to verify and claim your website. These instructions include placing a tag or code on your website for verification. You can have someone on your team place a specific code on your website or, if you need someone else to handle this rather tech-savvy step, you can hire someone from Fiverr to do it for you.
Thank you for the detailed info. Joining Groups makes so much more sense. Great advice! I am a new blogger, http://www.justordinarymom.com, and still learning all the in’s and out’s of getting it started. Needless to say, it has been a challenge. I just posted my FIRST Pinterest post and I am just excited I was able to do it! Now just getting it seen.
Pinterest is constantly tweaking their algorithm and what worked marvelously in 2014 is passé in 2015. You might notice that your Pinterest home page now features pins that are “picked for you”. What I noticed about those pins is there’s nothing exceptional about them in terms of the dimensions or their descriptions but they typically have one thing in common and that is recency.  Those picked for your pins are typically only 2 or 3 hours old. That’s why I think a critical Pinterest tip for 2015 is that we absolutely must use a tool to schedule our pins! My favorite is Tailwind but I’m using checking out Viraltag and Ahalogy. My new motto for 2015 – Always Be Pinning!
But Pinterest is different and they follow a different approach. More to the point: My first viral pin, created in April 2015, now has more than 66.000 repins and still sends about 40 people to my site every day (click to see it, even though it looks oddly old-fashioned now). All in all, a bit less than 100.00 visitors. Do you know how many followers I had at that time? Less than 1.000 (around 800ish).
Thanks for all the tips here. I’ve been growing on pinterest, too, but still need to accelerate things. I’ve been finding it challenging to get into more of the top decor boards (I do flooring) as many are closed to new pinners). I’ve also been collaborating with a friend of mine who has a larger following and more group boards, and we are helping each other.
Pinterest, at its very core, is a fascinating — and addictive — blend of wish list creation, window shopping, and recipe hunting. When it comes to creating boards with the goal to sell products, Buyable Pin acts as a powerful tool. Just imagine the revenue this could bring in at Christmastime alone, when people are desperately hunting for that last-minute gift.

If your business is focused on producing amazing content, that you would like to get more visibility than what a Facebook post or a few tweets can provide, Pinterest is a wonderful platform to solve that. Because of Pinterest’s search engine, you can see a blog post or article resurface as a popular Pin that is bringing traffic to your website, long after you first pinned it. Many users have seen traffic from a blog post for several years after first posting it.


People use Pinterest for different reasons than they use networks like Facebook and Instagram. Pinterest is a network where people look for inspiration, including specifically seeking out ideas about new products to buy. That means they are excited to see posts from brands in their feeds. According to eMarketer, only Facebook outranks Pinterest in terms of influencing U.S. social media users’ purchasing decisions.
You likely already have a number of Boards on your Business Pinterest Account. If not, you need to stop right now, and create Boards that resonate with both your business and your market. Pin it full of mixed content like products, household tips, lifestyle images and more, all revolving around your Board theme. Post related links back to your blog, too.
The number one Pinterest tip I can give you is to be true to your brand in your Pinnable images. Create a certain recognizable style. Always use the same font, logo or watermark, and other elements when you add an image to a blog post. Over time people will start to recognize you for your pictures on Pinterest. Those pictures give them an incentive to take a look on your blog to see if you’ve updated lately. That means more traffic for you, all by simply being true to your brand. 

The content saved by users is distributed to a wider audience by the Pinterest algorithm in people’s home feed and search results. As a business, your aim is to make your content inspirational and discoverable, so that it gets seen, saved (i.e. shared) and clicked as often as possible. Helpful content, keywords, and high-quality images are essential ingredients for success on Pinterest.
Hi Elise – Facebook actually has an app that will let you pull your pins into your Facebook page. It’s acting really wonky for me, though, so I’ll bet they’re still working out the kinks. Here’s the link – http://apps.facebook.com/pinterestapp/ Right now that App page is just re-routing to the Pinterest business page, so there seems to be some sort of issue, but I’ve seen business Pages use it, and it’s cool! Best of luck!
Pinterest helps you tell a visual story about your brand. Through pictures and videos, you’re able to show — rather than tell — your audience what you’re about as a company, the things you value, what and who you support, and the types of products and services you sell. Pinterest provides you with a unique and engaging way to introduce your small business to platform users.

Thanks so much Beth for this article! I have used Pinterest personally but never for my business until several t-shirt designs I posted lead to orders coming in the door. We are now in the process of setting up a “business” account. This article is MOST HELPFUL! I have taken notes and plan on using SO MANY of your ideas. We have been in business 20 years but I feel like such a newbie with all this social media stuff!!! Exciting to start learning from you.

Thank you for this information. I found this while at work so I will begin to implement these things once I get home. Also, I am just getting started blogging on my Senior website/blog to bring in more traffic…do you have any suggestions to gaining my target clients to read my blog? My website is http://www.missaraebia.com and I welcome any suggestions. I am also a mom blogger. I have 6 children, (1) just got married last week. Thank you so much and I am super excited to have bumped into your blog!


As you begin to use Pinterest marketing as part of your business’ marketing strategy, you may find that you need help creating amazing graphics setting up your Pinterest account or even creating the right content. Consider using a platform like Fiverr to hire an expert designer or Pinterest marketer to help you maximize your Pinterest marketing efforts.

Users will never even see your image if you don’t have the right keywords and copy to tell them (and the Pinterest algorithm) what you have in store. Pin descriptions, board descriptions, profile descriptions, and board titles should all creatively include keywords for that very reason—but avoid writing copy that looks and feels like low-effort keyword stuffing.


The number one Pinterest tip I can give you is to be true to your brand in your Pinnable images. Create a certain recognizable style. Always use the same font, logo or watermark, and other elements when you add an image to a blog post. Over time people will start to recognize you for your pictures on Pinterest. Those pictures give them an incentive to take a look on your blog to see if you’ve updated lately. That means more traffic for you, all by simply being true to your brand. 
As an advertising platform, Pinterest can be used in a variety of ways and for most types of businesses. The important part is to determine precisely how you will use it before you spend a lot of time on it. Bear in mind that it’s a platform for inspiration, discovery, and ideas, so for the most part, in order to engage users, you have to “catch” them in the planning and consideration phase of a project or purchase.
To start off with, using Pinterest for business purposes is something that Pinterest itself has spent time, effort and energy optimizing, and they’ve made it very easy for businesses to understand how to use Pinterest for business. Using Pinterest for business purposes is slightly different from most social media platforms and also slightly different from search engines like Google, so it’s important to approach your Pinterest marketing strategy a little bit differently as well.
SocialPilot Lite is free to schedule up to 30 pins and post 10 times per day. Their individual plan is $10 a month and comes with considerably more. You can schedule up to 1000 posts in your queue and post 50 times per day. The content discovery tools are limited while the analytics they provide are non-existent in this basic package. Tailwind and even Buffer have a wider variety of Pinterest automation tools available for this pricing level.
Take some time to search around Pinterest to get an idea of what types of images draw your eye to them most quickly. Are there certain colors that grab your attention? Do you tend to click on images with superimposed headings? Take some time to play around with your blog post images and notice which articles are receiving the most interaction from the Pinterest community.
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Pinterest has grown very quickly attracting both everyday users and businesses. All of them take part sharing great content in the form of images which makes it a very enjoyable and addictive experience. People have been able to do this with ease because there are several wonderful bloggers who share very helpful tips which teach everything from how to navigate the site to using it to promote your business.
Beth, fab tips! Instantly it struck me that photographers like myself, need to rethink how we present our online content so we can have our work shown without feeling marketers are using it to pretty their brand image and we receive little $ benefit down the line. Photographers spend not only their time — but thousands of dollars a year on equipment, software, make-up crew, props and workshops to generate a single image. A $6k lens an artist buys or rents is done to define eyes and make skin come alive. So instead of whining…
BoardBooster is a popular Pinterest automation software because their cheapest plan is $5 a month. This tool comes with all the features that their most expensive plan offers. You won’t get too many fancy analytics reports. Nonetheless, you’ll get the tools you need to schedule your pins effectively, remove low-quality pins from your boards, join and pin to group boards, and get access to basic analytics.
I’ve joined Pinterest and hooked it up to my business site. So far I haven’t really noticed any great increase in my site’s traffic due to Pinterest. But I agree…Pinterest is becoming huge and I think finally surpassed LinkedIn as one of the top three. Might as well play along! 🙂 Good tips though…I certainly started looking through my pins to see if and where I could I apply some of your advice.

Ideally, you don’t want to repin pins that deal directly with a topic that you have content about as you want to keep people reading your own content, not a competitor’s. However, you can repin things that might give additional or complementary information. For example, if you write about do-it-yourself home projects often, but you don’t have any content on how to restore old furniture, repinning some pins that are about that, might be helpful to your audience.
To make the most of your Pinterest ads, always create a Pinterest post-click landing page to direct all of your traffic to. This type of dedicated page is the best place for users to “land” after clicking your pin, and will significantly help convert prospects into leads because it’s free of distractions (e.g. header navigation, social icons, etc.).
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
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