15. Social Media Examiner: Social Media Examiner doesn’t exclusively publish Pinteret or visual marketing tips, but the ones that are published here are of the highest quality as they are written by people who have a vast knowledge of Pinterest. So make sure you read their posts on using Pinterest for business regularly. They also have some good articles on visual marketing.
I know, there are countless Pinterest courses out there. Some cost up to 300 USD. Are they better? I don’t know. I just know that I put everything I know about Pinterest into this guide and didn’t hold anything back. This guide is my way of saying thanks to all those countless guides that helped me starting out as a travel blogger more than 3 years ago. 

When we first created Pinterest back in 2010, the idea was to give people a place to collect ideas they found around the internet. But it quickly became so much more than that. What started as a site used by a dozen of our friends grew into a worldwide community of more than 250 million people. A handful of Pins grew into four billion boards, each representing someone’s plans for the future—from epic dream trips to what’s for dinner.
Once you’ve marketed yourself on Pinterest, a great way to bring it back home would be to embed your Pinterest feed on your website (http://www.postano.com/solutions/for-websites/). This way, you’re still exposing the content you’re posting on Pinterest to more eyes for those that visit your site that aren’t yet on Pinterest. Although it seems like everyone is on Pinterest, you’d be surprised how many people still aren’t.
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
By choosing the right category for your content to be shared in, your Pins and boards will become more searchable for users looking to discover content similar to that of your business. Users can search for specific categories on Pinterest or simply go to the “Categories” section of any profile on the platform to view all content related to the topic they’re searching.
Pins targeted by keyword only often show up in the home feed, too! Knowing that “keyword” targeting has more to do with the Pinner’s overall Pinterest behavior than their in-the-moment search really frees you up to go broad with your keywords. In fact, if you keep too tight with your keyword targeting, you may find it hard to get the impressions you need in order to evaluate your campaign.
Enter Pingroupie. This free tool’s entire purpose is to list group boards that are currently live. You could reach out to these board owners and see if they’d be open to doing a group board with you, or if they’re in need of contributors like you. If you’re able to contribute relevant, non-spammy content of your own, there could be a lot to gain for your brand.
Consistently monitor and optimize your campaigns. Pinterest is a social media platform primarily driven by visuals, and it's unpredictable what visual content will resonate with people. To run successful Pinterest ads, you need to constantly test different variations of your campaign-varied imagery, photos, text, keywords, bids and audiences. Eventually, you’ll be able to recognize the combination that suits your business best and brings maximum conversions.
One example of a successful campaign was the one that they ran last year. The furniture retailer realized that back-to-school was one of their key seasons because students are going to college and they have both limited budgets and space. Add that to the fact that about 50% of millennials use Pinterest, and there’s a massive opportunity for selling to college students.

You can create targeted Pinterest Ads that build awareness, drive consideration and grow your sales, all through the Pinterest Ads Manager. Simply pick your pin, create a goal, decide your target audience, set your bid, pay for results, track what’s working and alter your tactics accordingly.  There are currently five different Pinterest Ads Manager campaigns:
Really fab tips and just what I was looking for, as I stumble around on Pinterest. I tweeted it through the sharing buttons and I noticed that your Twitter name wasn't automatically provided (I like including the Twitter name when I share someone's posts as it thanks them). Yet I'm sure that when I've shared your posts in the pasts, the click-through link has included your Twitter name....just thought I'd mention it.
Include CTAs in your visual. The visual you use in the promoted pin should focus on catching the user's attention in a feed full of other appealing pins. Including direct CTAs in your visual will not just take away the visual appeal from your pin, but also get your ad disapproved. Make use of "soft" CTAs (like "Here's how to write a compelling blog post") when promoting a checklist you'll be redirecting them to.
@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right.
Now please, don’t go rushing off writing make-up tutorials on a travel blog. You’d probably have to solve this riddle through content curation. The more often somebody pins one of your pins, the more often they are shown your pins. This should be your ultimate goal. That being said, you could use it as inspiration as well, as even a travel blogger could be writing about an especially tasty local recipe.

I started using interval because I was hugely paranoid about spamming group boards (it took me ages to even get up the courage to post anything to the first one, lol) and mainly because I thought it would be good to drip the content out over time rather than in one big rush. Initially I thought that I could just keep each pin cycling through my group board list indefinitely, but that doesn’t take into account that as I make more pins, they start to stack and I might overwhelm the boards.

Pinterest is no social media channel, but a visual search engine. I’ve lost count how often I repeated this mantra in the last 3 years and recently even Pinterest officials are using similar terms. In the early days of Pinterest, people would follow other users and see what they liked in their feeds. But these days an increasing number of people will use it to search for recipes, wedding inspiration or travel guides. They are searching.
I think some people on Pinterest are upset about the idea of marketers coming in a “ruining” Pinterest. I have gotten some flack about this, as well. I think people responded the same way when businesses moved into the Facebook space, too. At any rate, you didn’t do anything wrong! And if people follow the first rule of Copyblogger, no “ruining” of anything will occur!
The “People you reach” tab has some extremely valuable information. We always think within our niche, but our followers don’t. They might be interested in travel, DYI home decor, and recipes. It can be a very smart idea to toss in a couple of boards to cover these topics as well. Your end goal should always be engagement, and what better way to engage than with the topics your audience likes?
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