Anything that might interest someone who is interested in blue stilettos is likely fair game. Pinterest is fairly lenient here because of the way keyword targeting works, but if you get too out there, say, targeting, “DIY planters,” your Pin will be rejected. Pinterest suggests that 100 keywords is the sweet spot, but you can get results with fewer.
Firstly, it is absolutely amazing investment especially when it comes to the artificial intelligence that it uses to pin the relevant items, find and show the right content which will be popular with my target audience. And to top it all, the great help it offers in scheduling the pins automatically and what I need to do is just feed my preferences once a week and it does the rest of the job. I love that I don’t have to create multiple PinPinterest accounts to manage multiple Pinterest accounts. I can manage them all at one place.
You may be right BUT . . . . I’ve peppered my Pinterest boards with links to resources (both mine and others) as well as entertaining pins related to my psychotherapy services and I’m getting a surprising amount of traffic from it. If the auto mechanic or lawyer chose to link back to resources, inspiration, great tips and tools, as well as entertainment . . . I suspect that he, too, would get traffic. For example, as an family law attorney might post information via images related to divorce, mediation, family therapy, custody, etc. And, an auto mechanic could post information via images related to auto maintenance, accident – prevention tips, insurance, car rental, AAA, etc.
May I ask why you use 2 different scheduling companies to schedule pins ? I’m using boardbooster to schedule my content to group boards and my own boards and also pinning others’ pins on my own boards. 70 % are others pins and 30% my own. Im pinning about 60 to 70 pins/day and the follower growth has been miserable. I’m also on group boards (currently about 10+ group boards.working on joining more). I’m trying to understand if it helps to use tailwind too vs just board booster
Even though Pinterest is a visual search engine, descriptions are what help users find what they’re looking for when they search for specific content on Pinterest using keywords. When creating descriptions for your pins, besides using keywords that users are searching for (which you can discover by using a tool like KWFinder) make sure that every pin’s description is evergreen so it has the greatest amount of lasting potential.

Pinterest image design and creation tools allow you to design, edit, create, and publish professional-looking photos and images for the platform (along with any other social media site and your website). Considering Pinterest is a visual social network where users discover eye-catching, beautiful, and creative images and videos, it’s important your content looks perfect so you can attract more followers and engagement on your profile.
Before choosing keywords, do your research. Check keywords using Google’s AdWords Keyword Planner, KeywordSpy or whatever tool you’re comfortable using. Also, do some research on Pinterest. Enter the keywords you’re considering using and see what comes up. People use Pinterest search differently than they use Google and other search engines, so it’s helpful to see the phrases the Pinterest community uses.

Hey Liz – did you change the name of that board recently? Sometimes when you do that, it causes problems. If that’s the case, you can try to change the name of the board back to its original name. Weird stuff happens sometimes because when you change the name of the board, the URL of that particular board changes, too, and I think sometimes the Pinterest system gets confused.

I have a site selling purebred and designer puppies. I’ve really been using Pinterest as a way to share great photos of puppies, but after reading this article, I will have a more focused and targeted approach. The puppies get lots of attention as it is, just trying to figure out how to convert that into puppy adoptions now. Thanks for the good read!

Hi Robin – the best way to get people to repin your images is to create (and pin) awesome photos. So I would take REALLY good quality pics of your best work (maybe fun or particularly beautiful signs) and consider pining those. But before you pin anything at all, ask yourself if that image will be useful, entertaining, educational or interesting to your ideal clients who are on Pinterest. If the answer is no, I would keep looking.


Until Pinterest Search Ads are available to all, we have to lump all our keywords into one ad group with one bid. This means, if you keep your bids low (as I do), your Pin may never be displayed for the more competitive keywords. Unless you have an enormous budget, you may be OK with that. If you find that some keywords which are important to you are not generating impressions, start a new ad group with a higher bid per click to generate the exposure you need.
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
Pinterest recommends that you Pin something at least once per day, during peak times—which they’ve found to be evenings and weekends for U.S.-based brands. Pinterest also highlights that consistency is key—if you’re going to post a large number of posts over the course of a week, divide them up and post several per day rather than posting them all at once.
For me, it’s more budget friendly when I use Tailwind to pin to my group boards. With Tailwind I pin around 50-100 a day. I only pay $9.99 a month for unlimited pins. With Board Booster, I’d have to pay something like $84/month! So with Board Booster, I only pin 45 pins a day which is only $10/month. It’s just more cost effective for me. It may not be for you. Also, I would change that ratio to more pins of YOUR blog and less of other ones. As for follower growth, I don’t suspect a scheduling tool would help; getting more on group boards yes, making your blog Pinterest friendly and your pins Pin friendly.
Optimize your website content for Pinterest sharing (Part Two): Consider watermarking your images, or adding text to them. If you’re using your own images on Pinterest, one of the best ways to help your image stand out is by adding a clear description to the image itself, or adding a watermark with your business name. Make sure it’s clear, but that it doesn’t block out the main subject of the photo.

How to Run a Pinterest Contest Without Breaking the Rules: Are you aware of Pinterest contest rules and regulations? After many businesses misused the relaxed format, Pinterest revised its contest rules. They now require that contests be easy to enter, spam-free and in alignment with Pinterest branding guidelines. This article explains what you need to know to run successful and compliant Pinterest contests.
Kristi is a staff writer at Fit Small Business, focusing on marketing for small businesses. Her past experience includes founding, growing and selling her own full-service digital marketing agency. Her expertise includes content marketing, public relations, social media marketing, email marketing as well as event marketing. She has worked with over 500 small businesses & start-ups in her career. When she isn't writing or giving out marketing advice, she can be found planning her next travel adventure or enjoy Florida's beaches.

BoardBooster is a popular Pinterest automation software because their cheapest plan is $5 a month. This tool comes with all the features that their most expensive plan offers. You won’t get too many fancy analytics reports. Nonetheless, you’ll get the tools you need to schedule your pins effectively, remove low-quality pins from your boards, join and pin to group boards, and get access to basic analytics.
Great experts here Sue! I loved reading through all of this. Especially was interested in what Ilene Smith said about the "Picked for You". I had not noticed that one factor about them...that they are all new. But it happened to me the other night. 4 pins from the same board went crazy all at once (crazy like I don't see on food content that is not my niche). I know it was Pinterest showing these "appetizers" to other users in Picked for you. And within a few hour it was over! So TRUE! Consistent pinning all day long is important!
The boundary between commercial and personal is always fuzzy when you’re talking about entrepreneurs. Founders of travel companies are travel geeks. Founders of graphic design agencies are design geeks. Founders of clothing companies are fashion geeks. When you’re sharing something you’re genuinely geeky about that also has to do with how you make a living, the lines get blurry.
Thank you for this information. I found this while at work so I will begin to implement these things once I get home. Also, I am just getting started blogging on my Senior website/blog to bring in more traffic…do you have any suggestions to gaining my target clients to read my blog? My website is http://www.missaraebia.com and I welcome any suggestions. I am also a mom blogger. I have 6 children, (1) just got married last week. Thank you so much and I am super excited to have bumped into your blog!
Hi Erika – I apologize for this – it turns out that you’re right and I was wrong! When you invite someone to contribute to your board, you don’t have any way of deleting (or even editing) that person’s pins. I think this is a pretty significant design flaw that I hope Pinterest will fix in the future. Sorry for the confusion on this “moderation” issue – but I appreciate you bringing it up so I can stand publicly corrected!
This has a very important implication: The more engaged and loyal your followers are, the faster your pin will take off. Pinterest has said the number of followers did not matter as much as the percental engagement. This, however, also means that users who built their accounts organically (as opposed to follow/unfollow techniques), will have a bigger benefit.

I pin ten times per day, 7 of my own pins and 3 of other peoples. I aim to pin my most popular content first, found in my Google or Pinterest analytics. Then I pin seasonal content, and then lastly, my new content. I primarily focus on personal boards instead of group boards and I check my Tailwind stats one time per month to inform me on how it’s working. I check my analytics to see how my pins are performing there as well.
The “People you reach” tab has some extremely valuable information. We always think within our niche, but our followers don’t. They might be interested in travel, DYI home decor, and recipes. It can be a very smart idea to toss in a couple of boards to cover these topics as well. Your end goal should always be engagement, and what better way to engage than with the topics your audience likes?
When you follow and interact with other Pinterest users and their accounts, you’re able to initiate and maintain personal relationships between them and your business. This type of engagement has the potential to make your followers feel a level of loyalty towards your brand that keeps them coming back to your profile for inspiration, ideas, and to buy products.
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