Our mission at Pinterest is to bring everyone the inspiration to create the life they love. We believe promoted content can play a big role in helping people create a life they love, which is why we want ads to be some of the best stuff you see on Pinterest. If you follow these guidelines, you’ll be all set for promoting great content on Pinterest.
Pin with your target market in mind. Not just the things that you personally write about, but also lateral content they’re also interested in. This applies not just to what you pin, but how you craft your pin descriptions, board descriptions, and profile. Think of your target market every time you sit down to pin, and you’ll have much greater results than if you only pin according to your own tastes. 
Ideally, you don’t want to repin pins that deal directly with a topic that you have content about as you want to keep people reading your own content, not a competitor’s. However, you can repin things that might give additional or complementary information. For example, if you write about do-it-yourself home projects often, but you don’t have any content on how to restore old furniture, repinning some pins that are about that, might be helpful to your audience.
To make your pins discoverable by users, optimizing your pin titles and descriptions with keywords will help Pinterest suggest your content as a search result when relevant. We discussed Keyword Research in depth in our Ultimate Guide to Keyword Research article, and although it’s tailored towards finding keywords for search engines like Google, the same principles apply to finding keywords for Pinterest. Your Pinterest marketing keyword strategy, however, should be to use as many keywords as possible whenever and wherever relevant so your content can be discoverable by as many users as possible searching for pins like yours.

Hi Elna, this was great info. I’m just starting out using Pinterest for a new blog. I’ve taken a few Pinterest courses that cover the Pinterest side of things, but one thing that I’m a bit confused about is the best placement of the Pinterest image inside my blog post. Some blogs have a featured image at the top with a Pinterest image at the bottom, some just have a huge Pinterest image at the top…so I’m uncertain what is the best thing to do!

Once you’ve marketed yourself on Pinterest, a great way to bring it back home would be to embed your Pinterest feed on your website (http://www.postano.com/solutions/for-websites/). This way, you’re still exposing the content you’re posting on Pinterest to more eyes for those that visit your site that aren’t yet on Pinterest. Although it seems like everyone is on Pinterest, you’d be surprised how many people still aren’t.
Hashtags work similarly to keywords in that they help your pins be discoverable by Pinterest users. In this Ultimate Marketer’s Guide to Pinterest, hashtags have been described as being more of a categorical element, and less of a tool to help your content show up in Pinterest search results, so don’t rely on them as heavily as you would keywords to get your content in front of searching users.
If you use the Pinterest tag or send us mobile app activity, you must tell your website and app visitors that their information will be shared with third parties for online behavioral advertising, and that they can opt out of online behavioral advertising through their Pinterest personalization settings, the AdChoices website optout.aboutads.info (if you use the Pinterest tag), or their mobile ad identifier settings (if you share app activity data with us).

I think we need to finish that sentence from Pinterest’s terms of service, for clarification’s sake. It reads, “…you hereby grant to Cold Brew Labs a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free license, with the right to sublicense, to use, copy, adapt, modify, distribute, license, sell, transfer, publicly display, publicly perform, transmit, stream, broadcast, access, view, and otherwise exploit such Member Content only on, through or by means of the Site, Application or Services. Cold Brew Labs does not claim any ownership rights in any such Member Content and nothing in these Terms will be deemed to restrict any rights that you may have to use and exploit any such Member Content.”


I’ve been on Pinterest for six months or so. My first reaction was “oh, pretty” and “wow, so useful” and “this could suck up entire days/weeks/months!” So I’ve been very hesitant to spend too much time there. Things have definitely picked up in the last 3 months. I see that many of the small business textile organizations and designers are using the B2B pretty effectively, but these are very visual businesses.
I really, really like Pinterest, but I just read an article about Pinterest’s scary terms of service! It’s making me think about removing all the content I have on there. And I’m wondering how you or I can ethically go on promoting them? I had to go look up the terms of service myself and was apalled that by posting your own original content you are giving Cold Brew Labs irrevocable rights to your artwork! Here’s an exact copy and paste “By making available any Member Content through the Site, Application or Services, you hereby grant to Cold Brew Labs a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free license, with the right to sublicense, to use, copy, adapt, modify, distribute, license, sell, transfer, publicly display, publicly perform, transmit, stream, broadcast, access, view, and otherwise exploit …..”
Starting a new board is one of the initial steps you take towards building your Pinterest marketing endeavor. And that’s exactly when you should also baseline your analytics.See to it that you determine the most critical metrics for your Pinterest campaign, and use the data to understand what content sources you should continue using and which you should avoid in the future.
Pinterest’s conversion tracking tags are a little more complicated to set up than Facebook’s, and for merchants without coding experience it can be intimidating. One of the biggest advantages of this app is that it simplifies the process of setting up Pinterest conversion tracking tags for your store. And without the tracking tags, you wouldn’t be able to retarget accurately, or track the results from your Promoted Pin campaigns.
Pinterest recommends that you Pin something at least once per day, during peak times—which they’ve found to be evenings and weekends for U.S.-based brands. Pinterest also highlights that consistency is key—if you’re going to post a large number of posts over the course of a week, divide them up and post several per day rather than posting them all at once.
Monetization: Currently, Pinterest is not a very successful business. Unlike Facebook, they are not reaping billions each year. At one point they need to cash in and this will probably lead to less traffic to your website. Why is this important? I am not entirely sure you should lay all your eggs in the Pinterest basket anymore. Try to diversify (SEO or be an early discover for a new medium). It’s just a hunch, but traffic potential from Pinterest might just be about to see its peak.
Social Warfare is one such WordPress plugin that enables the use of social share buttons and Pinterest marketing. Besides being able to use it to set a custom Pinterest image and fallback, their Pro version also has a unique feature called “Pin image for browser extensions”. When turned to the ON position, this toggle adds your custom Pinterest image to the choice of images to Pin when a visitor uses a browser extension to Pin. Social Warfare Pro starts at $29/year for a one website license.

6. Mixing your personal interest boards with business-related boards. There are actually a few instances where I’ve seen this done successfully, but overall this tactic doesn’t work. Are your customers actually interested in the recipes you’re considering trying or the table settings you want at your fantasy wedding? Probably not. Keep your business account for your business and your personal account for your personal interests.


Again, with your advice above, it’s time to protect your own investment and create a winning solution for yourself as a photographer or graphic artist. Make watermarks that are visible and stand out on the Pinterest page.(screenshot example: http://flic.kr/p/bu6PG6) and put out goodies for the Pinsters in clearly labeled and keyword friendly folders and sections on your web site. Many many photogs use flash sites for their portfolios which you can not pin.

Kristi is a staff writer at Fit Small Business, focusing on marketing for small businesses. Her past experience includes founding, growing and selling her own full-service digital marketing agency. Her expertise includes content marketing, public relations, social media marketing, email marketing as well as event marketing. She has worked with over 500 small businesses & start-ups in her career. When she isn't writing or giving out marketing advice, she can be found planning her next travel adventure or enjoy Florida's beaches.
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