The problem is, that people don’t get to pass it up. If they have chosen to use Flickr to display their work, for example, someone can go “pin” their image without the artist ever knowing, until they find it pinned all over the place and hosted on blogs. When licensing work, they may even choose to pass up a group they disagree with, say, AARP for example, yet that group can create a board to promote their work and go out and grab any image they like from the net. What then? What makes “pinning” inherently different than taking any image from anywhere and putting it on your website?
A note on ad groups. Your ad group is where you set your daily budget and all your targeting. It can be very tempting to break out your targeting into dozens of ad groups for easy analysis. If you have time for that, by all means, go ahead, but be aware that if your ad groups are below about $5/day, it’s going to take a long time to get a clear picture of what is working and what isn’t. After all, if you bid $.25, and your daily budget is $1, how long will it take before you know if those clicks are converting at a decent rate?

EXAMPLE: My blog is all about online marketing, blogging and social media so I created boards around those topics or other topics that my audience would be interested in. For example, I don’t blog about interior design but I do have a “Home Office Inspiration” board because I know that people who read my blog do a lot of work from their home offices. I keep all other boards (such as “Dog Tips” or other personal ones) secret to keep my account clean and to make sure that people know why they are following me.
I find that one mistake people often make is to leave out keywords on their boards. Board names are searchable (though significantly less than actual pins). It’s vital to choose board names with a strong SEO. For instance, ‘yummmy’ is not a good board name. It has no searchable context. Choose something like, ‘dessert recipes’ or even more specific, ‘pumpkin desserts’ instead.
Your cover photo is your first impression and the first thing a user sees when they come to your page. Hence, it is important to make it attractive. Also, Pinterest allows you to choose which pin to use as your cover image. Therefore, don’t forget to optimize the Cover photos on Pinterest of each board. Lastly, choose a high-quality image that is attractive and bright for your cover photo.
You’re always going to find the standard tips you read everywhere: use high-quality images; focus on a long vertical with bright colors; craft a killer headline. But the most surprising piece of advice I have received is to practice skillful social listening on Pinterest. Find the people who have pinned your content by going to Pinterest.com/Source/[YourURL]. Then, leave them a comment thanking them for pinning it. This is so easy, yet it is such a rare occurrence that this simple gesture roots you in the mind of those people who have already encountered and enjoyed your content. This is a powerful way to build a devoted following. 
Yeah, Anshul, I gotta admit – I didn’t see the point of Pinterest for a long time. I thought it was another pared-down Facebook knock-off. But then I started using it and can really see all the different ways it can be used for marketing. Plus, it’s now driving over HALF the traffic to my site, and I’m just getting started! I saw an immediate boost to traffic and mailing list signups. It’s been a huge boon for me.
The creators of this software intended to help you maximize your Pinterest strategy. The Tailwind app works well for bloggers, business owners, social media managers, and beginners alike. It also supports Instagram besides Pinterest. The full list of included tools is too long to fully expand upon. However, here’s a sneak peek of what you can expect to get out of Tailwind.

While this is a comprehensive list I am pretty disappointed that there is absolutely no mention of the requirement to respect copyright and ask people first. I don’t have time to read all your posts re Pinterest. ….as you brushed off the person who asked about this. However…..I have a strong aversion to people not being informed clearly of the need to respect copyright. Especially since you have made it clear, and I know others are already using their boards commercially to make money from technically stolen prints.Pinterest has yet to have a TOC and system that ensures copyright is protected. They have tinkered but not fixed.People offering advise in my opinion have a duty to push for a respect of copyright.Links back….no not after the first repin it would seem, when Pinterest then divert the links to make them money.
You can also pre-populate the pin descriptions that users save to their own boards with the Pinterest Save Button. This makes it faster for users to save your images to their boards and means that all the correct, necessary and optimized information will be in the description which will make it more useful for other users who see the pin on Pinterest. If you don’t specify a description, Pinterest will pull a description from your webpage, which may not be as well optimized for Pinterest. To learn more about pre-filling your descriptions, check out this help page from Pinterest.
Beth, fab tips! Instantly it struck me that photographers like myself, need to rethink how we present our online content so we can have our work shown without feeling marketers are using it to pretty their brand image and we receive little $ benefit down the line. Photographers spend not only their time — but thousands of dollars a year on equipment, software, make-up crew, props and workshops to generate a single image. A $6k lens an artist buys or rents is done to define eyes and make skin come alive. So instead of whining…
Pinterest recommends that you Pin something at least once per day, during peak times—which they’ve found to be evenings and weekends for U.S.-based brands. Pinterest also highlights that consistency is key—if you’re going to post a large number of posts over the course of a week, divide them up and post several per day rather than posting them all at once.
Pinning from websites means you’re adding fresh content into the mix. This kind of rings a bell within the Pinterest hamster cage and says “Woah, hold on a sec, here’s someone providing something new. We like them!”. If the images you’re pinning are high quality, look amazing and link to a valuable source, Pinterest will in turn see you as a valuable user. 
You’re welcome Candice. Promoted Pins has now changed quite a bit from when I first wrote this article. They now have two types, cost per engagement (CPE) and cost per click (CPC). You used also be able to find out the search volume of search terms before placing an order. That’s no longer the case. Unfortunately only businesses with a U.S IP address and U.S. credit card are able to use Promoted Pins. It’s not very fair… :(
Tiffany! I love the way you write. I think you write the way you talk so I felt like I was sitting right there next to you and listening with perked ears! Thank you so much. You took a headache inducing topic and simplified it. This was my first time on your blog and I loved every minute of it. I am a new blogger so I needed to hear this. And that Milo Tree recommendation, I am onto it. Thanks again!

Your anchor board is a board where you only pin your own content and they all lead people to your blog posts, website or landing pages. (I suggest creating this even if you haven’t created your own pins to go in it yet. We will work on that in the next step.) You should name it something obvious such as “Best of BLOG NAME” so people know that you pin your own content in there.
Unlike Facebook and Instagram, both heavily focused on the social interaction between the users, Pinterest is a personal and private discovery platform.  It’s all about the user. You’re allowed to dream about personal topics (and even things you DON’T want to share) like trying to get pregnant or new fitness goals, because you can create a secret board and pin to it.
Unlike Facebook and Instagram, both heavily focused on the social interaction between the users, Pinterest is a personal and private discovery platform.  It’s all about the user. You’re allowed to dream about personal topics (and even things you DON’T want to share) like trying to get pregnant or new fitness goals, because you can create a secret board and pin to it.
In short, Pinterest is the perfect place to start your sales funnel from. With Pinterest pins, you can build awareness around your brand and products, develop consumer interest, and increase traffic, but then you can also use Pinterest to boost in-store and online sales and influence users to take actions like sign-up to, purchase and install products.
My wife got me into Pinterest which I initially just wrote off as “another” social media site. Great article Beth. I will have to follow you and see how to use all these techniques first-hand. It seems like the web in general is evolving into a more picture oriented communication medium. Pinterest is the future, here now. I can see Google having a picture based search only option in the not too distant future.

Your growth story is very inspiring. You already had over 600 followers though! That’s a lot compared to my measly 30. Do you think your strategies help from the very beginning? I’m probably still too new to contribute to group pages, though I feel I have valuable content. If you have advice for beginners that is different from what you’ve already mentioned, I’d really appreciate hearing it!

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