Ideally, you don’t want to repin pins that deal directly with a topic that you have content about as you want to keep people reading your own content, not a competitor’s. However, you can repin things that might give additional or complementary information. For example, if you write about do-it-yourself home projects often, but you don’t have any content on how to restore old furniture, repinning some pins that are about that, might be helpful to your audience.
Hello! My name is Ana and I am a UK blogging growth strategist & coach, social media geek and the biggest supporter of women who are starting a blog or building their digital empires. I am obsessed with all things blog traffic and affiliate marketing and The She Approach is simply the platform where I openly share my strategies & failures, in the hope of helping new bloggers get ahead faster. Read more →
Specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-limited. What do you want to achieve and when do you want to achieve it by. Do you want to increase your followers to 100 by the end of the quarter; or do you want a Pinterest ad to generate at least five bathroom tile sales by the end of the month? Being specific gives you a goal to aim for, it focuses your Pinterest marketing tools, and it helps you to monitor (and learn from) your successes.
Create highly pinnable graphics – “long and lean” as I call them.  Some of my simplest projects have become very popular on Pinterest because I created highly pinnable collages that show multiple images from the same project.  Pinterest loves vertical images, so every post should have a pinnable vertical image that includes a high-quality image, the title of the post, and your blog name or URL in a watermark.  It’s worth the bit of extra time it takes to create these images for the return on investment – increased blog traffic!
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High quality is a must, as is size. Vertical Pins (2:30 – 600px x 900px) work well because they take up more space, making them stand out. Contrast these with square images (600px x 600px) to make your content eye-catching on the discovery feed. Be sure that your images (and website for that matter) are mobile-friendly: over 85% of searches are in the App.
You may be right BUT . . . . I’ve peppered my Pinterest boards with links to resources (both mine and others) as well as entertaining pins related to my psychotherapy services and I’m getting a surprising amount of traffic from it. If the auto mechanic or lawyer chose to link back to resources, inspiration, great tips and tools, as well as entertainment . . . I suspect that he, too, would get traffic. For example, as an family law attorney might post information via images related to divorce, mediation, family therapy, custody, etc. And, an auto mechanic could post information via images related to auto maintenance, accident – prevention tips, insurance, car rental, AAA, etc.
If you use the Pinterest tag or send us mobile app activity, you must tell your website and app visitors that their information will be shared with third parties for online behavioral advertising, and that they can opt out of online behavioral advertising through their Pinterest personalization settings, the AdChoices website optout.aboutads.info (if you use the Pinterest tag), or their mobile ad identifier settings (if you share app activity data with us).
If you’re familiar with Adobe Photoshop, it’s another tool you can use to create Pinterest content. If you want to use Photoshop to create your Pinterest images but need a crash course in how to actually use Photoshop, we recommend checking out Skillshare’s photoshop classes, a few of the best ones you can see curated in our 40+ Best Skillshare Classes for Business article.
EXAMPLE: My blog is all about online marketing, blogging and social media so I created boards around those topics or other topics that my audience would be interested in. For example, I don’t blog about interior design but I do have a “Home Office Inspiration” board because I know that people who read my blog do a lot of work from their home offices. I keep all other boards (such as “Dog Tips” or other personal ones) secret to keep my account clean and to make sure that people know why they are following me.
Just a heads up to Beth and everyone else at CopyBlogger. I pinned this post to my board “Craft Advice and Blogs” to save it to read again later and though it was repinned 30-ish times, 3 people were upset about it and someone claimed they reported me for pinning it. I don’t know what the hell they’re upset about??? Have I done something terribly wrong?
Thank you so much for these tips!! I just started a Pinterest page for my blog (https://happilyunboxing.wordpress.com/) and have only been able to get three followers (after spending hours trying to figure out how to get more! I am looking forward to implementing your tips into my Pinterest strategy. If anyone wants to do a follow for follow I would love to help your Pinterest page grow as well!! @HappilyUnboxing 🙂

If you need a powerful Pinterest tool that truly digs deep and allows you to get the most out of your Pinterest account, Tailwind is probably a tool you’ll want to take a serious look at. Tailwind offers a free trial for your first 100 pins. This will help you get a feel for how things work. After your trial runs out, you can switch to the basic subscription of $9.99 a month.


6. Mixing your personal interest boards with business-related boards. There are actually a few instances where I’ve seen this done successfully, but overall this tactic doesn’t work. Are your customers actually interested in the recipes you’re considering trying or the table settings you want at your fantasy wedding? Probably not. Keep your business account for your business and your personal account for your personal interests.
It has over 200 million monthly global users and boasts over 100 billion Pins. And it gets better. Research by ecommerce platform Shopify found that it was the #2 source of all referral traffic to the site, that 93% of users were using it to plan their purchases, and that the average resulting order value was $50 (higher than any other social media source).

There is one important warning: You will only benefit from such groups if your pins are perfect. These initial repins help your pin appearing in a lot of feeds, but if your pin is not engaging enough, it could actually hurt more than it helps. Why? Because it will have tons of impressions, but maybe no clicks or comments, decreasing the overall engagement numbers.
Website traffic. When the goal is driving website traffic, Pinterest charges for clicks to a website (CPC). An important note on this campaign type is that advertisers are only charged when users click to acess your website directly from the promoted pin. There is no charge for clicks from a repinned pin. Those clicks are marked as downstream or promoted traffic and are highlighted in the campaign report.
If you use the Pinterest tag or send us mobile app activity, you must tell your website and app visitors that their information will be shared with third parties for online behavioral advertising, and that they can opt out of online behavioral advertising through their Pinterest personalization settings, the AdChoices website optout.aboutads.info (if you use the Pinterest tag), or their mobile ad identifier settings (if you share app activity data with us).
This is a slightly less automated option, but you can upload your content to Pinterest and save it to a “Secret” board that your followers – and any other users on Pinterest – cannot see, and then when you’re ready for the pin to go live to your Pinterest audience, you can re-pin the content to a non-secret board. You can’t automate the re-pinning process, you’ll have to do it manually, but at least your content will be ready to go in Pinterest, you just have to re-pin it to a non-secret board.

As a general rule, you want your boards to be 50 percent about your business and 50 percent about the interests of your audience that tie back to your business. By pinning your audience interest as well as your own content, you will entice them to engage with you more on Pinterest. When they engage with you more, Pinterest will show users your content more frequently in their feed.
But they will only show your first 5 pins after midnight UTC in the following tab. Then they will show the next 5 pins of the next person you follow and so on. Only when this reservoir is exhausted will they show your next 5 pins. This is the very reason it’s so important to share content throughout the day, start with your best, and not share it all at once.
Use Pinterest’s embed option to publish pins as content in your blog posts and website pages. Note: As Pinterest is catching on, you may need to tell your users that they need to click on a Pinterest image to get to the original source. When I tried this last week, a reader wrote to me and asked, “Is there more to that Pin thing? Or is it just a pretty image?”
Two of my consumer brand clients – Imperial Sugar and Dixie Crystals have seen a huge influx of traffic from Pinterest. In fact, in less than 30 days, Pinterest leapfrogged over Facebook in terms of referral traffic to our online recipe database. It’s the perfect medium for sharing recipes and tracking what types of recipes our community wants to see more of. You can find the boards at http://www.pinterest.com/imperialsugar and http://www.pinterest.com/dixiecrystals to see what we’ve done.
EXAMPLE: My blog is all about online marketing, blogging and social media so I created boards around those topics or other topics that my audience would be interested in. For example, I don’t blog about interior design but I do have a “Home Office Inspiration” board because I know that people who read my blog do a lot of work from their home offices. I keep all other boards (such as “Dog Tips” or other personal ones) secret to keep my account clean and to make sure that people know why they are following me.
Now please, don’t go rushing off writing make-up tutorials on a travel blog. You’d probably have to solve this riddle through content curation. The more often somebody pins one of your pins, the more often they are shown your pins. This should be your ultimate goal. That being said, you could use it as inspiration as well, as even a travel blogger could be writing about an especially tasty local recipe.
I’m a crafter and Etsy shop owner. I’ve been using Pinterest for nearly a month now and it’s generating a little bit of traffic, but not as much as I would like. I’m going to fine comb my way through this list over the weekend and see if I can implement some changes that will allow me to optimize my use of Pinterest. I honestly had no idea there were as many as 56 ways to market with Pinterest- so impressed!
As we discussed at the beginning of the article, content on Pinterest successfully gains engagement and shows up as a search result for months, so the content of your titles and descriptions need to be able to withstand that test of time. Titles and descriptions that are evergreen – as in, they don’t date themselves or refer to a very specific day or time of the year – have greater lasting potential. Some content on Pinterest will be season specific, such as content for recurring holidays, and that’s okay, but think about how you can even make descriptions for seasonal pins stay relevant for the same time of year next year.
The answer is two! I discuss more WHY in this post, but when we are resharing our top evergreen or seasonal content, you should be pinning directly from the landing page/blog post, OR, using Tailwind to reschedule the pin. All pins from Tailwind will also count as ‘fresh pins’. Pinterest is really favoring new and fresh content, but you don’t have to constantly churn out new content. The next tip can help with that!
I’ve done some thinking this past week, and I really don’t have much of a Pinterest strategy 🙂  But I do think what has worked for me, and would be my best tip, is that almost all my pins are things I truly like and that fit in my niche of homemade and DIY projects.  People who choose to follow me on Pinterest know that they will find pins and more ideas on the same subjects that brought them to my blog.  And if they found me on Pinterest first and have then come over to my blog, they will again find lots of info on the same subject as the type of pins they found interesting. I think this gives some continuity to my brand and continues to give me an authentic voice on my subject.  
The problem is, that people don’t get to pass it up. If they have chosen to use Flickr to display their work, for example, someone can go “pin” their image without the artist ever knowing, until they find it pinned all over the place and hosted on blogs. When licensing work, they may even choose to pass up a group they disagree with, say, AARP for example, yet that group can create a board to promote their work and go out and grab any image they like from the net. What then? What makes “pinning” inherently different than taking any image from anywhere and putting it on your website?
Similar to other advertising channels, Pinterest has its own Tag, which is a piece of code that is applied to your website. With the Tag, you will be able to better measure the effectiveness of your campaigns, understand customer paths from engagements to conversions, define audiences for remarketing and track a number of events such as page visits, category views, searches, cart additions, checkouts, video views, signups and leads.
Thank you so much for sharing. I started my blog a few months ago and it has been a slow process for me to setup and grow my blog. I haven’t had the traffic needed so I read your article to see if you had any tips. You have definitely added insight so I will try to implement tailwind to more followers. I am so excited and ready to see my blog grow and my followers increase.
Interest targeting and keyword targeting, however, hold more value than they’re typically given on other platforms. Choosing the right keywords is essential to ensuring your content pops up in the right searches organically, and the same is true for ad targeting. Choosing the right interests will help Pinterest place your ads with users who are most likely to be interested in seeing them when browsing.

Be sure to avoid board names that are more cute than descriptive. It is more important that your boards get found than to have a cute name. If you need some help thinking of optimal names for your boards, think about the keywords you might use to search for a certain topic. You can also take a look at the keywords on your website or the categories on your blog for more ideas on how to name your boards.
6 Ways to Use Pinterest to Promote Your Brand: Have you ignored Pinterest because you think your brand isn’t a fit? Every brand has a story to tell and visual content can help you tell it. Sharing your story with Pinterest’s engaged and active audience via compelling pictures is a great place to start. In this article you’ll see how six brands got creative with Pinterest and gained new followers and engagement.
If you don’t want to spend the next few months in trial and error, I highly recommend investing in a good Pinterest course. Not only will that polish any mistakes that you might be making with your Pinterest account, but it will help you form a bullet proof strategy! Start by taking the Pinterest Primer free course here and do your research online.

Think about creative ways to showcase your product and your brand visually. After studying the performance of 50,000 promoted Pins, Pinterest found that lifestyle images generally outperform product images. For instance, fashion and style Pins showing products in use in real life saw 30 percent more clickthroughs and 170 percent higher checkout rates than those showing the product alone.


A note on ad groups. Your ad group is where you set your daily budget and all your targeting. It can be very tempting to break out your targeting into dozens of ad groups for easy analysis. If you have time for that, by all means, go ahead, but be aware that if your ad groups are below about $5/day, it’s going to take a long time to get a clear picture of what is working and what isn’t. After all, if you bid $.25, and your daily budget is $1, how long will it take before you know if those clicks are converting at a decent rate?
Interest targeting and keyword targeting, however, hold more value than they’re typically given on other platforms. Choosing the right keywords is essential to ensuring your content pops up in the right searches organically, and the same is true for ad targeting. Choosing the right interests will help Pinterest place your ads with users who are most likely to be interested in seeing them when browsing.
To dive a little deeper. Pinterest group boards are boards where there are multiple pinners, with a single owner (either you or someone else). So you can create one, and invite people to pin – which alleviates the pinning workload, but comes with some responsibility. The easier version is getting on someone else’s board. A great tool for this is Pin Groupie which can help you find relevant and active boards. This way you can spread your pins (and others, don’t just pin your own) even wider, by leveraging audiences you had no access to before. Cool huh!
There are two types of Save Buttons: Automatic Buttons which show the Pinterest Save Button icon on your images automatically so users know they can save that image to Pinterest, and there’s also the Hover Buttons which show the Pinterest Save Button icon on your images when users’ cursors hover over your images, so they’re a little more discreet but still signal to your visitors that the image can be saved to their Pinterest boards.

Elna, this is a GREAT post and I love your blog. I have a question… my website doesn’t have many group boards… do you have some suggestions for me? My niche is dealing with Chronic Migraines (not fun or colorful!) and I don’t know where to start. Any help is welcome. I also have a course with a free bit, but I feel uneasy putting it in my bio…. I will have to think about that…
8. Not installing the “Pin It” button on your browser. While this won’t actually make you look dumb on Pinterest, it’s simply something you’ve got to do! The “pin it” button makes it super easy to curate content from any website. With a quick click, you can pin an image that contains a description and a website link. Simply highlight the text you want as the description before you click “Pin it.”
Think about creative ways to showcase your product and your brand visually. After studying the performance of 50,000 promoted Pins, Pinterest found that lifestyle images generally outperform product images. For instance, fashion and style Pins showing products in use in real life saw 30 percent more clickthroughs and 170 percent higher checkout rates than those showing the product alone.
May I ask why you use 2 different scheduling companies to schedule pins ? I’m using boardbooster to schedule my content to group boards and my own boards and also pinning others’ pins on my own boards. 70 % are others pins and 30% my own. Im pinning about 60 to 70 pins/day and the follower growth has been miserable. I’m also on group boards (currently about 10+ group boards.working on joining more). I’m trying to understand if it helps to use tailwind too vs just board booster
Create highly pinnable graphics – “long and lean” as I call them.  Some of my simplest projects have become very popular on Pinterest because I created highly pinnable collages that show multiple images from the same project.  Pinterest loves vertical images, so every post should have a pinnable vertical image that includes a high-quality image, the title of the post, and your blog name or URL in a watermark.  It’s worth the bit of extra time it takes to create these images for the return on investment – increased blog traffic!
I really, really like Pinterest, but I just read an article about Pinterest’s scary terms of service! It’s making me think about removing all the content I have on there. And I’m wondering how you or I can ethically go on promoting them? I had to go look up the terms of service myself and was apalled that by posting your own original content you are giving Cold Brew Labs irrevocable rights to your artwork! Here’s an exact copy and paste “By making available any Member Content through the Site, Application or Services, you hereby grant to Cold Brew Labs a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free license, with the right to sublicense, to use, copy, adapt, modify, distribute, license, sell, transfer, publicly display, publicly perform, transmit, stream, broadcast, access, view, and otherwise exploit …..”
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