Pinterest is all about the visuals. From infographics, to charts, to advice guides, your brand should increase your visual content in order to reach your audience. General Electric (GE) is a great example of a company that uses Pinterest to show off their products. GE has a board called “Badass Machines,” which illustrates different technologies that are produced by the company. Examples include wind machines, aviation engines, and locomotives. While any company can post pictures of their products, GE does things a little differently: They post visually stunning images that are either filtered through an editing program or taken at an interesting angle. The combination of the two amps up their Pinterest page, while promoting their brand in a cool new way. This is something any B2B organization can do, no matter the product or service.


One of the newer concepts to Pinterest is this: Is it better to repin a pin or save directly from a website? I know that’s confusing, so let me break it down. If we want to reshare our content on Pinterest (and you should—read here how I use Tailwind’s SmartLoop to do this), is it better to one, ‘repin’ or save on the Pinterest platform, or two, save from the website using the save tool (or alternatively, schedule a pin on Tailwind).
When you publish your post, you pin that post to Pinterest. Usually people pin that first pin from their blog to their own board. Then you go to THAT board and pin THAT pin. You don’t make a new pin or go back to your blog and pin it again. You want to establish repins, or shares, on that ONE pin. So repin that ONE pin over and over again and others will repin that pin for you!
One of the things I hear over and over again from Pinterest users–individuals and businesses–is that we don’t want Pinterest turning into another sales pitch ghetto as users plug their MLM products or Etsy sites or corporate product lines. The primary reason that Pinterest is so successful is its organic and cooperative nature. There are, as you listed, many ways (at least 54 it would seem) to promote a business or brand without resorting to carnival shilling and Web 1.0 scorched earth tactics.

Sarah, I am one of those small, non-visual businesses. I am a Licensed Professional Counselor in private practice. Half my practice is clinical and the other half is actually consulting with psychotherapists and allied health professionals to help them build strong practices. I am having success with Pinterest and am very excited about the possibilities. It’s too soon to be spouting off my stats (I’ve been on Pinterest less than 2 months) but anecdotal evidence is really great! In fact, I expect Pinterest to bring in a whole new band of prospects AND possibly rival my Twitter stats (which is my biggest referral source from social media).
Even if you are not active on Pinterest, people may already be sharing content from your website on Pinterest. To find out if this is the case, go to the following URL pinterest.com/source/your website address. This shows you pins that were pinned directly from your website, either by yourself (if you are pinning) or by other pinners. If the URL is not returning many results, this could be because your website was launched very recently or because it is difficult to pin directly from your website.

And why not? Pinterest currently has 250 million monthly active users and according to Pew Research, a whopping 29% of U.S. adults use Pinterest.When compared to other social media platforms, Pinterest is definitely on the smaller side. But what makes it an interesting option is the fact that people using the site are actually engaged with it. Which means, you have a higher chance of getting people to click-through to your site from Pinterest, than say, Twitter.

Starting a new board is one of the initial steps you take towards building your Pinterest marketing endeavor. And that’s exactly when you should also baseline your analytics.See to it that you determine the most critical metrics for your Pinterest campaign, and use the data to understand what content sources you should continue using and which you should avoid in the future.
What’s also unique about Pinterest is that when someone saves a Promoted Pin, other people see it in their feeds as well, which naturally encourages increased engagement and drives additional sales. And, although paid ad campaigns end, the Pins themselves last forever, so your ads will never stop appearing in front of users. Advertisers actually receive an average of 20% more clicks in the month after launching a Promoted Pin campaign.
You mention linking our Pinterest to our Facebook pages, but if we are a business and have a Facebook page, how can we link our Pinterest since pages don’t really have their own log-in?? If I try to link to Facebook, it picks up my personal Facebook account (and I’m admin of my page.) Do you know if an interface with Facebook pages for Pinterest is coming? Or I’m just going to post links on Facebook to my Pinterest boards is my plan. Thanks for the article-lots of great info!
And why not? Pinterest currently has 250 million monthly active users and according to Pew Research, a whopping 29% of U.S. adults use Pinterest.When compared to other social media platforms, Pinterest is definitely on the smaller side. But what makes it an interesting option is the fact that people using the site are actually engaged with it. Which means, you have a higher chance of getting people to click-through to your site from Pinterest, than say, Twitter.

I’m not an alarmist. I like safe, simple rules and guidelines that stay consistent over time. I don’t think Pinterest is any different. Over time, Pinterest marketing has evolved (hey, hashtags) but the foundation of keywords and vertical images has not. Human interaction with Pinterest has changed. In this post, I’ll be sharing the main principles to a solid Pinterest marketing strategy.


EXAMPLE: My blog is all about online marketing, blogging and social media so I created boards around those topics or other topics that my audience would be interested in. For example, I don’t blog about interior design but I do have a “Home Office Inspiration” board because I know that people who read my blog do a lot of work from their home offices. I keep all other boards (such as “Dog Tips” or other personal ones) secret to keep my account clean and to make sure that people know why they are following me.


This is only a guess. But Pinterest has indeed confirmed that they are working on various techniques to recognize both the author and the context of any picture. I’m fairly sure Pinterest already has a good idea what any given pictures is about, even if you provided no metadata whatsoever (so any empty description and no url, etc). It might be a good choice to incorporate easily recognizable landmarks, etc into your pin. The simpler, the better.
Facebook, Google, Instagram – all major sources of traffic are constantly evolving. Pinterest, however, changes more rapidly than all these three put together. At least, it often feels that way. Every 2 months or so, I see them testing out new features (as I have quite the big business account, I probably see some features that never get rolled out to average users).
Thanks for all the tips here. I’ve been growing on pinterest, too, but still need to accelerate things. I’ve been finding it challenging to get into more of the top decor boards (I do flooring) as many are closed to new pinners). I’ve also been collaborating with a friend of mine who has a larger following and more group boards, and we are helping each other.
I think the underlying major issue here is that NO ONE marketing tactic works. If it did, we’d all stick to enhancing our websites to be the best they could be. But no – blogs became popular because you could engage the consumer in a “conversation” via comments and they seem to lure more followers than a static website does. And then FB and Twitter and others, and now Pinterest. No one method seems perfect so business owners are all over the place trying every thing they can. Kind of makes you crazy…Now Pinterest is hot but as someone posted above, I, too, cannot get the search to work. I have searched on terms I know are on my own board names or pin descriptions and nothing comes up. It seems you have to know someone is on Pinterest and then begin following them… so I don’t know if a business can acquire new followers by someone generically searching on their subject matter if the search engine is so weird. But that brings me back to the Pinterest terms which say “no commercial use”!
The content saved by users is distributed to a wider audience by the Pinterest algorithm in people’s home feed and search results. As a business, your aim is to make your content inspirational and discoverable, so that it gets seen, saved (i.e. shared) and clicked as often as possible. Helpful content, keywords, and high-quality images are essential ingredients for success on Pinterest.
Hi Elna! Thanks for the great info. I plan on checking out Tailwind today! I have two pinterest accounts and they both have approximately 100,000 followers on each. I am also on several group boards. I generally avoid pinning images that link to my website on them, as I’m not sure if board owners would be bothered by this. I’d love to know your thoughts on this.
Pincodes are a unique code that work similarly to QR Codes and they help people find your brand and products on Pinterest. Pincodes can be placed on any of your physical brand assets like brochures, business cards, packaging and displays and whenever people scan them with their Pinterest app, it’ll direct them to your content destination on Pinterest.

Optimize your website content for Pinterest sharing (Part One): Use images in every single post you write, so your post can be shared on Pinterest. When you find yourself getting lazy about this, remember –- not using an image in your post means no one will pin it. And remember — the prettier the picture is, the more it will get pinned. The images that appeal to Pinterest members are powerful and emotive, so keep that in mind when choosing your pictures. That combination tends to work well for your blog readers, too.


I have already covered a few blogs you must read for Pinterest tips as a bonus in my article 30 Pinterest Accounts and Boards You Must Follow for Marketing Tips. Since then I have learnt about other blogs that regularly cover Pinterest tips, so here’s a separate article that is dedicated to the great blogs that cover the best Pinterest tips. Check them out below and read their tips to improve your Pinterest knowledge…

Pinterest is constantly tweaking their algorithm and what worked marvelously in 2014 is passé in 2015. You might notice that your Pinterest home page now features pins that are “picked for you”. What I noticed about those pins is there’s nothing exceptional about them in terms of the dimensions or their descriptions but they typically have one thing in common and that is recency.  Those picked for your pins are typically only 2 or 3 hours old. That’s why I think a critical Pinterest tip for 2015 is that we absolutely must use a tool to schedule our pins! My favorite is Tailwind but I’m using checking out Viraltag and Ahalogy. My new motto for 2015 – Always Be Pinning!


You’ll also see which boards your Pins are included in, which can give you a sense of how people think about your business and your products, and spark new ideas for how to position your Pinterest efforts. And you’ll get information about the demographics and interests of people who interact with your Pins, providing valuable insight to help you target your strategy to precisely the right audience.
One example of a successful campaign was the one that they ran last year. The furniture retailer realized that back-to-school was one of their key seasons because students are going to college and they have both limited budgets and space. Add that to the fact that about 50% of millennials use Pinterest, and there’s a massive opportunity for selling to college students.

They don’t want that. They already started crawling websites, but to be on the safe side, I’d recommend creating new pins for old posts once in a while. To be quite truthful with you: My first pins sucked, my layouts have vastly improved and there is still room for more improvement. I’m sure you will have (or had) a similar journey, and why not present every blog post in the best possible light at any given time, eh?
As you begin to use Pinterest marketing as part of your business’ marketing strategy, you may find that you need help creating amazing graphics setting up your Pinterest account or even creating the right content. Consider using a platform like Fiverr to hire an expert designer or Pinterest marketer to help you maximize your Pinterest marketing efforts.
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
Click on Analytics from the Pinterest Ads Manager dashboard to measure the performance of your campaign. You’ll first be presented with an overview of all campaigns and their key metrics, including total clicks or impressions; engagement rate or CTR; average eCPM (earned and non-earned cost-per impression) and eCPC (effective cost-per click); and total spend. Click on a specific campaign to drill down into its performance details.
They don’t want that. They already started crawling websites, but to be on the safe side, I’d recommend creating new pins for old posts once in a while. To be quite truthful with you: My first pins sucked, my layouts have vastly improved and there is still room for more improvement. I’m sure you will have (or had) a similar journey, and why not present every blog post in the best possible light at any given time, eh?
Take some time to search around Pinterest to get an idea of what types of images draw your eye to them most quickly. Are there certain colors that grab your attention? Do you tend to click on images with superimposed headings? Take some time to play around with your blog post images and notice which articles are receiving the most interaction from the Pinterest community.

The answer is two! I discuss more WHY in this post, but when we are resharing our top evergreen or seasonal content, you should be pinning directly from the landing page/blog post, OR, using Tailwind to reschedule the pin. All pins from Tailwind will also count as ‘fresh pins’. Pinterest is really favoring new and fresh content, but you don’t have to constantly churn out new content. The next tip can help with that!


6 Ways to Promote Your Business With Pinterest Places: Do you use Pinterest to promote your business? Have you heard of Pinterest place pins? Whether you have a storefront, products or a travel aspect to your business, consider exploring the geographic elements of Pinterest. In this article you’ll learn six ways you can use Pinterest place pins to promote your business or products.

I check their Blog, Pinterest for Business page, and Pinterest for Developers page frequently. I’m not a programmer, so sometimes I need help with the technical language. I love listening to Cynthia Sanchez’s Oh So Pinteresting podcast for assistance in this area. She interviews interesting and knowledgeable individuals who keep me current! I appreciate her tips too. The action steps she suggests are achievable and make a difference in my Pinning!
Great post – your tips are helpful! I joined Pinterest last week (after waiting for my invitation to arrive – nothing like not getting in right away to create more desire to join – lol!), but then wasn’t sure what to do with the site once I got there! I find myself torn between keeping this truly social and fun by posting photos of great clothes, food and images from my backyard chicken blog and mixing in my marketing business. I suppose the beauty of it is having different pin boards that reflect the different interests in our lives. Thanks for the helpful post.
When I stopped following people and just focused on pinning my follower rate increased significantly. I get anywhere from 1 to 10 new followers a day when before I was lucky to get a few a week. After the death of BB I focused on manually pinning so I could better learn Pinterest. We are going on vacation soon and I think I might need to join TW for fear that the traffic I took so long to build will die. I also hope that it will give me the boost I need to finally hit 25k sessions and join Mediavine. Thanks for the tips! I’ll be implementing them as well 🙂
Wow..This is just the Pinterest strategy that I’m looking for! I’m at a similar amount of followers to where you started so I’m definitely going to implement the different strategies that you recommend and hopefully start using Pinterest to drive more traffic to my blog. I’ve already optimize my bio and I started creating some really good looking images so I’m going to head over and pick up Tailwind right now and start applying for group boards.
First, complete your profile describing your business including relevant keywords that users will use to search. Next, you are going to want to upload a good logo as your profile picture. In addition, create minimum 10-12 boards and pin at least 9 pins on each board. As a result, this gives the board an active appearance and people will be more apt to explore your board.
I share Andrew’s perspective, but I would phrase it differently — be relevant! As a brand, before you jump in spend some time “listening” or observing to get an understanding of the platform and then map your Pinterest strategy accordingly. Look at your target audience, the types of boards they’ve created, and the content they’re pinning. How does your content fit in with that? How does Pinterest fit with your overall social marketing/business strategy?
The problem is, that people don’t get to pass it up. If they have chosen to use Flickr to display their work, for example, someone can go “pin” their image without the artist ever knowing, until they find it pinned all over the place and hosted on blogs. When licensing work, they may even choose to pass up a group they disagree with, say, AARP for example, yet that group can create a board to promote their work and go out and grab any image they like from the net. What then? What makes “pinning” inherently different than taking any image from anywhere and putting it on your website?
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