When you publish your post, you pin that post to Pinterest. Usually people pin that first pin from their blog to their own board. Then you go to THAT board and pin THAT pin. You don’t make a new pin or go back to your blog and pin it again. You want to establish repins, or shares, on that ONE pin. So repin that ONE pin over and over again and others will repin that pin for you!
Great post! I started using Pinterest over a week ago and my traffic increased dramatically! I really didn’t expect it! I have a little question… when I pin an image from my blog and get 100 repins for example, let’s say that this results in 500 views on my blog… shouldn’t I be gettin more and more traffic on the following days? I’ve noticed that my blog traffic only increaces when I pin…but I don’t understand how come my traffic is not multiplying as a result of the many repins I get. Instead my traffic goes back down until the next time I pin…
Anything that might interest someone who is interested in blue stilettos is likely fair game. Pinterest is fairly lenient here because of the way keyword targeting works, but if you get too out there, say, targeting, “DIY planters,” your Pin will be rejected. Pinterest suggests that 100 keywords is the sweet spot, but you can get results with fewer.
Great experts here Sue! I loved reading through all of this. Especially was interested in what Ilene Smith said about the "Picked for You". I had not noticed that one factor about them...that they are all new. But it happened to me the other night. 4 pins from the same board went crazy all at once (crazy like I don't see on food content that is not my niche). I know it was Pinterest showing these "appetizers" to other users in Picked for you. And within a few hour it was over! So TRUE! Consistent pinning all day long is important!
My fiance is a avid user of Pinterest and is on it all the time via her iPhone. Although we have researched various ways to use Pinterest as a marketing strategy, keep in mind that the demographic mainly caters to a female audience ages 25-55. We believe that Pinterest can be a very effective marketing hub, for specific types of business like wedding planners and floral businesses, not so much a law firm or auto mechanic shop for the time being.
The only reason why you might want to delete underperforming pins is a totally different one. Often new followers will come and check out your boards. They will repin what they liked. So, it is in your best interest to have beautiful boards inviting visitors to repin. When some content fails to lift off, it’s a good sign visitors will skip it as well.

For me, it’s more budget friendly when I use Tailwind to pin to my group boards. With Tailwind I pin around 50-100 a day. I only pay $9.99 a month for unlimited pins. With Board Booster, I’d have to pay something like $84/month! So with Board Booster, I only pin 45 pins a day which is only $10/month. It’s just more cost effective for me. It may not be for you. Also, I would change that ratio to more pins of YOUR blog and less of other ones. As for follower growth, I don’t suspect a scheduling tool would help; getting more on group boards yes, making your blog Pinterest friendly and your pins Pin friendly.

Oh there’s one thing, you’ve got fill in your billing information and then it’s ready to roll. There’s also some really great analytics that come with Pinterest advertising to help you understand which search terms converted best in terms of clicks, how many repins a particular Promoted Pin received and so forth. I’ll be covering that in my next blog post.


I don’t even know how many studies I’ve read on which color performed better than the other and how showing faces was a no-no. Pinterest has confirmed that these are false positives. A beauty pin without a face might be quite ridiculous and even though cold tones are said to perform not as good, a pin about a trip to Antartica would probably look weird with warm colors. If you are not sure about your design, produce alternatives and show them to a control group or just dish them out and focus on the pin that performs best.
Kristi is a staff writer at Fit Small Business, focusing on marketing for small businesses. Her past experience includes founding, growing and selling her own full-service digital marketing agency. Her expertise includes content marketing, public relations, social media marketing, email marketing as well as event marketing. She has worked with over 500 small businesses & start-ups in her career. When she isn't writing or giving out marketing advice, she can be found planning her next travel adventure or enjoy Florida's beaches.
Include relevant keywords in your targeting options. Pinterest allows you to add up to 150 keywords in a promoted pin, but most marketers make the mistake of trying to add as many as possible. This results in low click-throughs and conversions. Try to have a focused and targeted approach with Pinterest keywords. This isn't Google Adwords, so you need to think about how your target customer uses Pinterest every day and target those keywords. The keywords chosen shouldn’t only be focused on targeting users, but should also maintain context with what’s offered in the pin and the web page they’re redirected to.
To dive a little deeper. Pinterest group boards are boards where there are multiple pinners, with a single owner (either you or someone else). So you can create one, and invite people to pin – which alleviates the pinning workload, but comes with some responsibility. The easier version is getting on someone else’s board. A great tool for this is Pin Groupie which can help you find relevant and active boards. This way you can spread your pins (and others, don’t just pin your own) even wider, by leveraging audiences you had no access to before. Cool huh!

I pin a minimum of 5-10 pins per day. Most of those pins are my own content and are being pinned to my own boards, along with a few group boards. How often you pin per day depends on how much content you are creating. There is no magic number. You have to figure out what works for you. It’s not detrimental to pin 10 times one day and 15 the next day.
You’ll also see which boards your Pins are included in, which can give you a sense of how people think about your business and your products, and spark new ideas for how to position your Pinterest efforts. And you’ll get information about the demographics and interests of people who interact with your Pins, providing valuable insight to help you target your strategy to precisely the right audience.
To execute a winning Pinterest marketing strategy, you need to be pinning consistently to Pinterest. It’s recommended to pin between 11-20 times per day which may seem like a lot, but as outlined in this Ultimate Pinterest Marketing Guide, 80% of the content can be content you re-pin from other users on Pinterest (and thus save to your own Pinterest boards) while only 20% of it should be original content.
Anything that might interest someone who is interested in blue stilettos is likely fair game. Pinterest is fairly lenient here because of the way keyword targeting works, but if you get too out there, say, targeting, “DIY planters,” your Pin will be rejected. Pinterest suggests that 100 keywords is the sweet spot, but you can get results with fewer.
Pin with your target market in mind. Not just the things that you personally write about, but also lateral content they’re also interested in. This applies not just to what you pin, but how you craft your pin descriptions, board descriptions, and profile. Think of your target market every time you sit down to pin, and you’ll have much greater results than if you only pin according to your own tastes. 

Pinterest boards group together content with the same theme. For example, DAVIDsTEA — which has corporate partnerships — categorizes its boards based on seasonal teas, cooking with tea, tea-infused cocktails, and more. DAVIDsTEA’s boards are carefully pieced together to include the types of information their audience will enjoy. In addition to creating awesome boards, be sure to link all the content in your boards to your website or a landing page — within reason, of course — so you’re reiterating your messaging, as well as your organization.
I’m so new to all of this. I’m a wedding music looking to engage with brides and grooms. On my website I’ve included a few blog posts so far, but absolutely need to make the content better and with more images. I’m just at a loss sometimes for inspiration on what to write about. On my business Pinterest account, I’ve included boards to help inspire brides and grooms. Pretty much the only ones that redirect back to my website/blog are on my Texas Harmony board. What in the world should I do to change the number of conversions from people clicking to actually visiting my blog for wedding ideas? And do you have articles on brainstorming what to blog about??? I know there are tons of pins out there but I’m pinned out for the night. Lol
Boards are used to organize and categorize Pins (don’t worry, we’ll get to these next). From Boards about the new bathroom and next vacation location to wedding planning and ultimate wish-lists (just say the word and we’ll link you to ours). Boards enable users to gather their Pins into a logical and beautiful fashion. Plus, Boards can be divided up into sections, to make them even more organized.
Like Pinterest discusses in their Tips for Creating Customer Growth on Pinterest article, “too often, online marketing tactics focus on customers who already know what they want to buy—instead of expanding their reach to also include people earlier in their shopping journey,” which is an extremely important perspective to keep in mind when creating content for your Pinterest marketing strategy. To grow your reach on Pinterest, you need to focus on the early steps in a user’s shopping journey and that starts by telling a story and creating a need for the user to make them want to purchase your product to fulfill that need.
×