Create highly pinnable graphics – “long and lean” as I call them.  Some of my simplest projects have become very popular on Pinterest because I created highly pinnable collages that show multiple images from the same project.  Pinterest loves vertical images, so every post should have a pinnable vertical image that includes a high-quality image, the title of the post, and your blog name or URL in a watermark.  It’s worth the bit of extra time it takes to create these images for the return on investment – increased blog traffic!
The “People you reach” tab has some extremely valuable information. We always think within our niche, but our followers don’t. They might be interested in travel, DYI home decor, and recipes. It can be a very smart idea to toss in a couple of boards to cover these topics as well. Your end goal should always be engagement, and what better way to engage than with the topics your audience likes? 

I think we need to finish that sentence from Pinterest’s terms of service, for clarification’s sake. It reads, “…you hereby grant to Cold Brew Labs a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free license, with the right to sublicense, to use, copy, adapt, modify, distribute, license, sell, transfer, publicly display, publicly perform, transmit, stream, broadcast, access, view, and otherwise exploit such Member Content only on, through or by means of the Site, Application or Services. Cold Brew Labs does not claim any ownership rights in any such Member Content and nothing in these Terms will be deemed to restrict any rights that you may have to use and exploit any such Member Content.”

Sure, we’ve just told you that Pinterest is a visual medium—but great visuals alone are not enough to create serious engagement. Make the most of the description field to tell viewers exactly what they will get if they click through to the linked content on your site. Make sure to include your most important keywords to help your Pins appear in search (but, of course, be sure to do this in a natural and helpful way rather than engaging in keyword stuffing).

14. Not enabling “rich pins.” By enabling rich pins on your website, real-time pricing will accompany the images that are pinned from your website. Pinners will also be able to see if the product is in stock, where they can buy it, and if your item goes on sale. Pinterest even alerts the people who have repinned your product when the price drops! Make sure you’re enabling “rich pins.”


One of the newer concepts to Pinterest is this: Is it better to repin a pin or save directly from a website? I know that’s confusing, so let me break it down. If we want to reshare our content on Pinterest (and you should—read here how I use Tailwind’s SmartLoop to do this), is it better to one, ‘repin’ or save on the Pinterest platform, or two, save from the website using the save tool (or alternatively, schedule a pin on Tailwind).

Me again- going through the list now and writing some things down to keep in mind for later and making changes as I go along- care to elaborate a bit more on #44 – “Do you have a number of different ideal client personas? Create a separate board to represent each client persona, then use those boards during your sales cycle and embed them into your website pages so people are clear about the kinds of clients you’re trying to attract.”
Again, with your advice above, it’s time to protect your own investment and create a winning solution for yourself as a photographer or graphic artist. Make watermarks that are visible and stand out on the Pinterest page.(screenshot example: http://flic.kr/p/bu6PG6) and put out goodies for the Pinsters in clearly labeled and keyword friendly folders and sections on your web site. Many many photogs use flash sites for their portfolios which you can not pin.

To dive a little deeper. Pinterest group boards are boards where there are multiple pinners, with a single owner (either you or someone else). So you can create one, and invite people to pin – which alleviates the pinning workload, but comes with some responsibility. The easier version is getting on someone else’s board. A great tool for this is Pin Groupie which can help you find relevant and active boards. This way you can spread your pins (and others, don’t just pin your own) even wider, by leveraging audiences you had no access to before. Cool huh!

So, how do you do this? It all starts with creating great content – otherwise known as “pins” – to share on Pinterest. Unlike most social media platforms, success on Pinterest is not dependant on the number of followers your account has. Content on Pinterest has much more reach, and a reach that mimics the algorithm of search engines, so it’s much easier and more seamless for users to see and engage with your content even if they aren’t following you on Pinterest. This means that it’s still possible for brands to get excellent reach and engagement on their Pinterest content even if they don’t have a large following on the platform.

you’ll have to connect your Pinterest profile to your personal account/profile on Facebook- what it will do then is show all or most of your pins on your facebook wall- or in the newsfeed of your facebook friends. also connecting with facebook lets all your fb friends know you are using pinterest, so you can automatically start with some pinterest followers..
Until Pinterest Search Ads are available to all, we have to lump all our keywords into one ad group with one bid. This means, if you keep your bids low (as I do), your Pin may never be displayed for the more competitive keywords. Unless you have an enormous budget, you may be OK with that. If you find that some keywords which are important to you are not generating impressions, start a new ad group with a higher bid per click to generate the exposure you need.

You should also repin content that your audience would like to your boards. No matter how much content you create, your audience will want more. Repinning other people’s content helps give that to them. It also helps build rapport with those whose content your repinning to share with your audience. You should view your social media content as being a resource to those that follow you, so give them valuable content, both yours and others.
For me, it’s more budget friendly when I use Tailwind to pin to my group boards. With Tailwind I pin around 50-100 a day. I only pay $9.99 a month for unlimited pins. With Board Booster, I’d have to pay something like $84/month! So with Board Booster, I only pin 45 pins a day which is only $10/month. It’s just more cost effective for me. It may not be for you. Also, I would change that ratio to more pins of YOUR blog and less of other ones. As for follower growth, I don’t suspect a scheduling tool would help; getting more on group boards yes, making your blog Pinterest friendly and your pins Pin friendly.
A great post! This is Misato from https://fitwirr.com/. When I initially started, I grew my followers the very similar ways as yours – group boards, long images, Tailwind, etc.. One thing I really appreciated Tailwind was they give you stats on each boards’ ROI. The boards with most followers, activities, etc.. were all there, and it helped me narrow my focus and really understand what people are interested in and wanted to see more of.
Hashtags work similarly to keywords in that they help your pins be discoverable by Pinterest users. In this Ultimate Marketer’s Guide to Pinterest, hashtags have been described as being more of a categorical element, and less of a tool to help your content show up in Pinterest search results, so don’t rely on them as heavily as you would keywords to get your content in front of searching users.
Tiffany! I love the way you write. I think you write the way you talk so I felt like I was sitting right there next to you and listening with perked ears! Thank you so much. You took a headache inducing topic and simplified it. This was my first time on your blog and I loved every minute of it. I am a new blogger so I needed to hear this. And that Milo Tree recommendation, I am onto it. Thanks again! 

Pinterest, at its very core, is a fascinating — and addictive — blend of wish list creation, window shopping, and recipe hunting. When it comes to creating boards with the goal to sell products, Buyable Pin acts as a powerful tool. Just imagine the revenue this could bring in at Christmastime alone, when people are desperately hunting for that last-minute gift.
When I stopped following people and just focused on pinning my follower rate increased significantly. I get anywhere from 1 to 10 new followers a day when before I was lucky to get a few a week. After the death of BB I focused on manually pinning so I could better learn Pinterest. We are going on vacation soon and I think I might need to join TW for fear that the traffic I took so long to build will die. I also hope that it will give me the boost I need to finally hit 25k sessions and join Mediavine. Thanks for the tips! I’ll be implementing them as well 🙂
@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right.
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