Firstly, only posting images of your product photos, although not an entirely poor Pinterest marketing strategy, is not ideal because it will only help you acquire a limited volume of users rather than grow your user base. To acquire volume and growth, you need to be pinning product-specific content (like product photos) as well as content that’s inclusive of your product but not solely trying to sell the product itself. This will help you create new customers rather than simply acquire existing ones.
25. Thinking that B2Bs don’t belong on Pinterest. As a B2B on Pinterest, there’s actually a lot you can do to humanize your brand and tell your story through visuals. Pinterest allows you to showcase the people that make your business a success, industry statistics or news, your brand’s content or useful information, and tips your customers can benefit from. You don’t need to be a retail brand to be successful on Pinterest either. Just take a look at the Constant Contact page. We’re an email marketing company and we’re close to having 70,000 followers!
The benefits for marketers are huge. And here’s one of the biggest and best parts of Buyable Pins: Pinterest doesn’t take a cut of your sales. There’s no commission. You keep every dollar you make on the sales you get from Buyable Pins. Though that has the potential to change down the line if Buyable Pins see a lot of success, for now marketers are using them with no drawbacks.
The pin/save button appears directly on your website’s product pages, making it easy for browsers to pin (and share) a link to their own Boards. 5x more easy to be precise. Immediately you’re making it simple for potential customers to engage with you and you’re gaining knowledge of who has pinned content from your website; providing you with an opportunity to engage right back.
My best Pinterest tip is to pin like your followers. Your followers do not pin from just 10:00-10:30 am every single weekday. Sure, you can schedule your pins out, but remember that your perfect follower (and possible blog reader) sleeps, eats, works, takes care of children, has doctor’s appointments, etc. They don’t have a schedule of when they pin, they pin when they can. Since I’ve started using Pinterest as just a regular person vs. blogger trying to drive traffic, I’ve seen my number of followers increase quickly. Of course, my tip may not work for everyone, but it doesn’t hurt to play with your pinning strategy to gauge results. Take a strategy and try it for 2 weeks, analyze, tweak, and happy pinning!

If your target audience is active on Pinterest, it is definitely worth adding it to your marketing mix. For categories such as food, travel, home decoration, fashion and beauty, Pinterest is an obvious choice. However, it can be made to work for practically any type of business, whether you sell products or services. Many service-based businesses do very well on Pinterest.
Pinterest recommends that you Pin something at least once per day, during peak times—which they’ve found to be evenings and weekends for U.S.-based brands. Pinterest also highlights that consistency is key—if you’re going to post a large number of posts over the course of a week, divide them up and post several per day rather than posting them all at once.
The end goal of using Pinterest for business is to get users to engage with and take action on your pins. Engagement can mean anything from clicking on a pin to see it in detail, saving a pin to one of their boards, sharing a pin with a peer or even trying a pin idea out for themselves. All of this helps to create brand awareness and puts users in the very beginning stages of your sales funnel.

Great suggestions, Patricia – and this conversation has made me pay much closer attention to what I’m re-pinning now. I always check to see that the pin links back to a valid website. Recently I’ve seen quite a few images that just link back to the “Google Images” search page, and I definitely don’t re-pin those because it seems like that image was likely just lifted from Google.
They don’t want that. They already started crawling websites, but to be on the safe side, I’d recommend creating new pins for old posts once in a while. To be quite truthful with you: My first pins sucked, my layouts have vastly improved and there is still room for more improvement. I’m sure you will have (or had) a similar journey, and why not present every blog post in the best possible light at any given time, eh? 

I am teaching a social media workshop next weekend at the University of Washington. I’m using my blog in lieu of textbooks because with social media changing so fast it’s impossible to find a book that’s up to date! Would you mind if I repost this on my blog with full disclosre that it originates here (and I would of course add links back to you)? I think the students would get a lot out of this piece! Thanks for your consideration!
Thanks for stopping by and commenting! Yes! Join more group boards! But, I thought you were already on a lot? Oh, maybe that’s FB 🙂 As for the interval function, I had no idea that was an option in Tailwind. I honestly don’t stay in the dashboard of Tailwind so I’m learning as I go. How is that different from scheduling them based on your schedule? Is this so you don’t “spam” a group board? So far I haven’t had that happened even when I was scheduling 200 pins a day. I’ll go over to Lady Boss League and find that post! Thanks

Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
Part of the reason behind the furniture store’s Pinterest success is that the audience is already 'engaged' in projects like décor, so the people that use the app or site are essentially already planning to purchase specific products. IKEA has also taken advantage of Pinterest's new advertising formats such as shopping ads, which has helped them lower their cost-per-click (CPC).
The last step is to create your first board. To make it easier for users to find your content, such as blogs, special offers, new products, and more — create a business board first and then add relevant Pins. For example, for blog content you’ve posted on your first board, you can then create feature images for each blog post and include a summary of the post in the description to pique user interest.
A great post! This is Misato from https://fitwirr.com/. When I initially started, I grew my followers the very similar ways as yours – group boards, long images, Tailwind, etc.. One thing I really appreciated Tailwind was they give you stats on each boards’ ROI. The boards with most followers, activities, etc.. were all there, and it helped me narrow my focus and really understand what people are interested in and wanted to see more of.

Take some time to search around Pinterest to get an idea of what types of images draw your eye to them most quickly. Are there certain colors that grab your attention? Do you tend to click on images with superimposed headings? Take some time to play around with your blog post images and notice which articles are receiving the most interaction from the Pinterest community.
Pinterest’s conversion tracking tags are a little more complicated to set up than Facebook’s, and for merchants without coding experience it can be intimidating. One of the biggest advantages of this app is that it simplifies the process of setting up Pinterest conversion tracking tags for your store. And without the tracking tags, you wouldn’t be able to retarget accurately, or track the results from your Promoted Pin campaigns.
I am not paying for Tailwind’s paid plan just yet. Make sure that you have either archived or deleted your boards that have nothing to do with your niche. If you frequently share other bloggers’ work, you can create a board for that. I labeled mine “Bloggers Network”. Try to schedule at least 10-20 pins every single day, spread out on different boards and definitely start using Tribes! With Tailwind’s free account, you can share up to 80 pins to Tribes, and those should be your most popular pins from your blog because those are the ones that will get repinned by other pinners within the group. I hope this helps! If you’re struggling to nail down your niche and find your blogging voice, you can check out this post https://melissablevins.com/finding-your-voice-through-blogging 🙂 Let me know if you have any other questions!
Starting a new board is one of the initial steps you take towards building your Pinterest marketing endeavor. And that’s exactly when you should also baseline your analytics.See to it that you determine the most critical metrics for your Pinterest campaign, and use the data to understand what content sources you should continue using and which you should avoid in the future.
Hi Elise – Facebook actually has an app that will let you pull your pins into your Facebook page. It’s acting really wonky for me, though, so I’ll bet they’re still working out the kinks. Here’s the link – http://apps.facebook.com/pinterestapp/ Right now that App page is just re-routing to the Pinterest business page, so there seems to be some sort of issue, but I’ve seen business Pages use it, and it’s cool! Best of luck!
I share Andrew’s perspective, but I would phrase it differently — be relevant! As a brand, before you jump in spend some time “listening” or observing to get an understanding of the platform and then map your Pinterest strategy accordingly. Look at your target audience, the types of boards they’ve created, and the content they’re pinning. How does your content fit in with that? How does Pinterest fit with your overall social marketing/business strategy?
May I ask why you use 2 different scheduling companies to schedule pins ? I’m using boardbooster to schedule my content to group boards and my own boards and also pinning others’ pins on my own boards. 70 % are others pins and 30% my own. Im pinning about 60 to 70 pins/day and the follower growth has been miserable. I’m also on group boards (currently about 10+ group boards.working on joining more). I’m trying to understand if it helps to use tailwind too vs just board booster
Collaborative boards can help you reach a new group of pinners and have your pins be seen by more people. You do need to be careful about which boards you join because all the pins will show on your Pinterest presence as well. You can only select the cover photo if you are the owner of the group board. One of my newest collaborative boards is my Pinterest Tips for Success board. All the pinners are fantastic about adding great content and sharing their Pinterest skills.
Thank you for this wonderful posting, very informative. I love Pinterest. It allows you to see so much more than you would ever have time to discover on your own. I am a primitive artist and have an Etsy shop, blog and belong to 2 different selling groups. I recently created a group board and have invited other artisans to post their goodes to the board, in a very short period of time our followers have doubled, we see our items being repinned and it is becoming a viable source of traffic to our sites. I also have a wonderful recipe (Yums I Want to Make) and I’ve invited my daughter and SIL to contribute…omg I gain weight everytime I look at the board. I’ve traveled to many sites from these pins and discovered some wonderful people.
Pin with your target market in mind. Not just the things that you personally write about, but also lateral content they’re also interested in. This applies not just to what you pin, but how you craft your pin descriptions, board descriptions, and profile. Think of your target market every time you sit down to pin, and you’ll have much greater results than if you only pin according to your own tastes. 
How to Start a Pinterest Board That Succeeds: Are your prospects on Pinterest? Do you want to start a Pinterest board? When starting on Pinterest, you’ll want to fill new boards with quality starter pins. Once you’ve launched your new boards, it’s important to pin more content to them daily. This article shows how to develop Pinterest boards for your business.
You’re always going to find the standard tips you read everywhere: use high-quality images; focus on a long vertical with bright colors; craft a killer headline. But the most surprising piece of advice I have received is to practice skillful social listening on Pinterest. Find the people who have pinned your content by going to Pinterest.com/Source/[YourURL]. Then, leave them a comment thanking them for pinning it. This is so easy, yet it is such a rare occurrence that this simple gesture roots you in the mind of those people who have already encountered and enjoyed your content. This is a powerful way to build a devoted following. 

Kristi is a staff writer at Fit Small Business, focusing on marketing for small businesses. Her past experience includes founding, growing and selling her own full-service digital marketing agency. Her expertise includes content marketing, public relations, social media marketing, email marketing as well as event marketing. She has worked with over 500 small businesses & start-ups in her career. When she isn't writing or giving out marketing advice, she can be found planning her next travel adventure or enjoy Florida's beaches.
Elna, this is a GREAT post and I love your blog. I have a question… my website doesn’t have many group boards… do you have some suggestions for me? My niche is dealing with Chronic Migraines (not fun or colorful!) and I don’t know where to start. Any help is welcome. I also have a course with a free bit, but I feel uneasy putting it in my bio…. I will have to think about that…
Pinterest is all about the visuals. From infographics, to charts, to advice guides, your brand should increase your visual content in order to reach your audience. General Electric (GE) is a great example of a company that uses Pinterest to show off their products. GE has a board called “Badass Machines,” which illustrates different technologies that are produced by the company. Examples include wind machines, aviation engines, and locomotives. While any company can post pictures of their products, GE does things a little differently: They post visually stunning images that are either filtered through an editing program or taken at an interesting angle. The combination of the two amps up their Pinterest page, while promoting their brand in a cool new way. This is something any B2B organization can do, no matter the product or service.
Hi Elna! Thanks for the great info. I plan on checking out Tailwind today! I have two pinterest accounts and they both have approximately 100,000 followers on each. I am also on several group boards. I generally avoid pinning images that link to my website on them, as I’m not sure if board owners would be bothered by this. I’d love to know your thoughts on this.
Thanks so much! So glad you found tips for your Pinterest followers and Pinterest marketing strategy. As for those types of group boards, I wouldn’t worry too much. As a group owner of three group boards, I don’t police them too much so I would suspect many of bloggers do the same! Just make sure to hit shuffle if you schedule your pins that way with Tailwind!
Opt for a content-based approach. I remember seeing a recipe for a breakfast parfait and saving it, only to realize later on that the recipe was from Fage, a Greek yogurt brand, and it featured a specific flavor of yogurt none of their competitors had. It was a smart move, because content like recipes and DIY tutorials perform great on Pinterest. If you can feature your products in a similar way, this is a good strategy to try, especially for brand awareness campaigns.
WHY: Not only does this help you get found and gives Pinterest a better idea of what you’re all about so they can recommend your account and your boards to other people, but strangers who happen to come across your account don’t have to spend hours determining what you pin about and if they should follow you. So you improve your chances of being found by the right people.

A note on ad groups. Your ad group is where you set your daily budget and all your targeting. It can be very tempting to break out your targeting into dozens of ad groups for easy analysis. If you have time for that, by all means, go ahead, but be aware that if your ad groups are below about $5/day, it’s going to take a long time to get a clear picture of what is working and what isn’t. After all, if you bid $.25, and your daily budget is $1, how long will it take before you know if those clicks are converting at a decent rate?


Eighty percent of Pinners use the Pinterest app to access the network on mobile devices, so images should be optimized for a small screen. Vertical images are your best bet, since they give you more real estate to work with. The image ratio can be up to 1:2.8, but 2:3 is ideal,which means your image should be 600 x 900 pixels. If your image is taller than 1560 pixels, it will get cut off.

Businesses which focus on highly visual advertising, such as interior designers, clothing companies, restaurants and many others can benefit in particular by effective Pinterest marketing. With 72% of Pinterest’s audience being women, it can be an exceedingly valuable tool for targeting specific niches. Besides Pinterest allows you to interact with your customers in ways that other social media platforms don’t.
Pinterest image design and creation tools allow you to design, edit, create, and publish professional-looking photos and images for the platform (along with any other social media site and your website). Considering Pinterest is a visual social network where users discover eye-catching, beautiful, and creative images and videos, it’s important your content looks perfect so you can attract more followers and engagement on your profile.

Keywords are the words that your ideal audience would use to look for what your business does on Pinterest. In order to be as visible as possible, you want to make sure that your pins are discovered easily, which is where careful keyword choices can be helpful. The best way to find the right keywords for your business on Pinterest is to actually perform Pinterest searches on your own to see what comes up on Pinterest.
The end goal of using Pinterest for business is to get users to engage with and take action on your pins. Engagement can mean anything from clicking on a pin to see it in detail, saving a pin to one of their boards, sharing a pin with a peer or even trying a pin idea out for themselves. All of this helps to create brand awareness and puts users in the very beginning stages of your sales funnel.

My latest Pinterest tip is to create a “Pins I’ve Clicked Through Board.” I fully believe that you are your best researcher for your audience. After all, if you are interested enough to write and research about it you should be your best audience. For many of us, Pinterest is a huge traffic driver for our blogs and websites. Honestly, when I want to know something I will generally search it on Pinterest before I go to Google.
There are two types of Save Buttons: Automatic Buttons which show the Pinterest Save Button icon on your images automatically so users know they can save that image to Pinterest, and there’s also the Hover Buttons which show the Pinterest Save Button icon on your images when users’ cursors hover over your images, so they’re a little more discreet but still signal to your visitors that the image can be saved to their Pinterest boards.
As a general rule, you want your boards to be 50 percent about your business and 50 percent about the interests of your audience that tie back to your business. By pinning your audience interest as well as your own content, you will entice them to engage with you more on Pinterest. When they engage with you more, Pinterest will show users your content more frequently in their feed.
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