While Pinterest is well-known for its food, health and travel posts, it’s also a platform that can take ordinary or even dry topics and make them engaging and interesting. For example, website developers and financial planners all successfully use Pinterest to teach “dry” topics like banking and coding. Divorce attorneys and project managers can offer their most helpful content to those who are searching for answers or the latest inspirations on that topic.
They don’t want that. They already started crawling websites, but to be on the safe side, I’d recommend creating new pins for old posts once in a while. To be quite truthful with you: My first pins sucked, my layouts have vastly improved and there is still room for more improvement. I’m sure you will have (or had) a similar journey, and why not present every blog post in the best possible light at any given time, eh?
We want people on Pinterest to understand who's promoting content. You can't manage more than one advertiser through a single account or change the advertiser on an account. You also can't create boards for someone else (for example, if you're an agency) and promote stuff from those boards. Instead, you can help someone else promote ads from their own account.

A note on ad groups. Your ad group is where you set your daily budget and all your targeting. It can be very tempting to break out your targeting into dozens of ad groups for easy analysis. If you have time for that, by all means, go ahead, but be aware that if your ad groups are below about $5/day, it’s going to take a long time to get a clear picture of what is working and what isn’t. After all, if you bid $.25, and your daily budget is $1, how long will it take before you know if those clicks are converting at a decent rate?
@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right.
Alisa Meredith is the Content Marketing Manager at Tailwind – a Pinterest and Instagram scheduler and analytics platform. She is a sought-after speaker and teacher on Pinterest and Promoted Pins in particular, having spoken at Social Media Marketing World, Agents of Change and appearing on The Art of Paid Traffic and Social Pros podcasts. Alisa has invested heavily in becoming an expert in her craft – realizing (and loving) the fact that the learning never ends!  She lives in coastal North Carolina with her pampered pets Spike (who only eats eggs and Spam), Pepe the couchpotato Cavapoo, and more cats than she’d like to admit to.
To execute a winning Pinterest marketing strategy, you need to be pinning consistently to Pinterest. It’s recommended to pin between 11-20 times per day which may seem like a lot, but as outlined in this Ultimate Pinterest Marketing Guide, 80% of the content can be content you re-pin from other users on Pinterest (and thus save to your own Pinterest boards) while only 20% of it should be original content.
Then I edit the picture in Adobe Photoshop. This IS important. Your original image might not be suited for Pinterest as it does not get your idea across. I often extend the sky (to have some good background) or enlargen certain landmarks or combine multiple images into one. Say you got a whale on the one picture and a boat on the other, but the pin is about whale watching, so do cheat a little.

May I ask why you use 2 different scheduling companies to schedule pins ? I’m using boardbooster to schedule my content to group boards and my own boards and also pinning others’ pins on my own boards. 70 % are others pins and 30% my own. Im pinning about 60 to 70 pins/day and the follower growth has been miserable. I’m also on group boards (currently about 10+ group boards.working on joining more). I’m trying to understand if it helps to use tailwind too vs just board booster
Include CTAs in your visual. The visual you use in the promoted pin should focus on catching the user's attention in a feed full of other appealing pins. Including direct CTAs in your visual will not just take away the visual appeal from your pin, but also get your ad disapproved. Make use of "soft" CTAs (like "Here's how to write a compelling blog post") when promoting a checklist you'll be redirecting them to. 

One of the many benefits of having a business account is that you can create private boards that are not publicly visible to Pinterest users, and with these, you can compose Pins that you later deploy as part of a campaign. (If you are unable to locate a Pin that you want to promote, be sure to check if it’s in a secret board, as Pins can only be promoted from public or protected boards.)
Rand Fiskin from MOZ is predicting that Pinterest advertising will be a juggernaut in the upcoming 2015 year for social media advertising. He’s predicting that advertising spending on the social media site will reach $50 million dollars.  And I predict that the amount of advertising dollars on Pinterest will continue to grow as well. So how do you take advantage of this juggernaut opportunity?
Businesses which focus on highly visual advertising, such as interior designers, clothing companies, restaurants and many others can benefit in particular by effective Pinterest marketing. With 72% of Pinterest’s audience being women, it can be an exceedingly valuable tool for targeting specific niches. Besides Pinterest allows you to interact with your customers in ways that other social media platforms don’t.
Pincodes are a unique code that work similarly to QR Codes and they help people find your brand and products on Pinterest. Pincodes can be placed on any of your physical brand assets like brochures, business cards, packaging and displays and whenever people scan them with their Pinterest app, it’ll direct them to your content destination on Pinterest.
If you go the video route, make sure to keep it short, hook viewers within the first few seconds, and optimize it to play without sound. Also make sure your logo appears at the beginning or throughout the entirety of your video, so people know what they’re watching—and who it comes from. Branded content is actionable and trustworthy, so tends to perform well on Pinterest.
Hi Elna! Thanks for the great info. I plan on checking out Tailwind today! I have two pinterest accounts and they both have approximately 100,000 followers on each. I am also on several group boards. I generally avoid pinning images that link to my website on them, as I’m not sure if board owners would be bothered by this. I’d love to know your thoughts on this.
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