The Mojo Spa in Illinois has a very unique, distinctive brand. They create good-for-you cosmetics in an affordable price range, and the creator of the company calls herself the “Willy Wonka of beauty.” Their Pinterest does a remarkable job of capturing the whimsical and wonderfully quirky nature of their brand while promoting their products simultaneously. Just in case users aren’t familiar with their brand, they give you a summary of who they are in their profile bio:
You’ll also see which boards your Pins are included in, which can give you a sense of how people think about your business and your products, and spark new ideas for how to position your Pinterest efforts. And you’ll get information about the demographics and interests of people who interact with your Pins, providing valuable insight to help you target your strategy to precisely the right audience.
Anything that might interest someone who is interested in blue stilettos is likely fair game. Pinterest is fairly lenient here because of the way keyword targeting works, but if you get too out there, say, targeting, “DIY planters,” your Pin will be rejected. Pinterest suggests that 100 keywords is the sweet spot, but you can get results with fewer.
Include CTAs in your visual. The visual you use in the promoted pin should focus on catching the user's attention in a feed full of other appealing pins. Including direct CTAs in your visual will not just take away the visual appeal from your pin, but also get your ad disapproved. Make use of "soft" CTAs (like "Here's how to write a compelling blog post") when promoting a checklist you'll be redirecting them to.

If you have top evergreen content or seasonal content, I highly recommend creating new pin images for those same landing posts. I have been doing this with success for the last few months and getting new visits and traffic from older blog posts that had already performed well on the platform. You can update the post with the fresh pins, as well as add them using the “+” bar on the Pinterest platform.


People use Pinterest for different reasons than they use networks like Facebook and Instagram. Pinterest is a network where people look for inspiration, including specifically seeking out ideas about new products to buy. That means they are excited to see posts from brands in their feeds. According to eMarketer, only Facebook outranks Pinterest in terms of influencing U.S. social media users’ purchasing decisions.
Great post – your tips are helpful! I joined Pinterest last week (after waiting for my invitation to arrive – nothing like not getting in right away to create more desire to join – lol!), but then wasn’t sure what to do with the site once I got there! I find myself torn between keeping this truly social and fun by posting photos of great clothes, food and images from my backyard chicken blog and mixing in my marketing business. I suppose the beauty of it is having different pin boards that reflect the different interests in our lives. Thanks for the helpful post.
I share Andrew’s perspective, but I would phrase it differently — be relevant! As a brand, before you jump in spend some time “listening” or observing to get an understanding of the platform and then map your Pinterest strategy accordingly. Look at your target audience, the types of boards they’ve created, and the content they’re pinning. How does your content fit in with that? How does Pinterest fit with your overall social marketing/business strategy?
6 Ways to Promote Your Business With Pinterest Places: Do you use Pinterest to promote your business? Have you heard of Pinterest place pins? Whether you have a storefront, products or a travel aspect to your business, consider exploring the geographic elements of Pinterest. In this article you’ll learn six ways you can use Pinterest place pins to promote your business or products.
It’s hard to choose just one, but I think my best Pinterest tip would be to take the time to really understand how Pinterest works. Just like any form of social media, you’ll see best results if you understand what Pinterest is and how to best use it for YOUR brand. Do your research, experiment with different ideas, pay attention to the analytics, tweak your strategy, and above all have fun with it! 

Businesses which focus on highly visual advertising, such as interior designers, clothing companies, restaurants and many others can benefit in particular by effective Pinterest marketing. With 72% of Pinterest’s audience being women, it can be an exceedingly valuable tool for targeting specific niches. Besides Pinterest allows you to interact with your customers in ways that other social media platforms don’t.
One trick is to use various quotes from your most recent blog post or testimonials about your recent product and link to the website page many different times. You can also Pin the same Pin to different boards. For example, if you write a blog post about buying the best homeowners insurance, that can go on a board that only holds your blog posts, it can also go on a board that talks about financial planning and a board that talks about homeownership.
If you already have a Pinterest business account, make note of the traffic that Pinterest is currently sending you. You should track progress on a regular basis - it tells you if your marketing efforts are paying off, or not. This also applies to newbies on Pinterest - even though you do not have any historical data to benchmark against, monthly tracking will be helpful to monitor future progress.
I pin ten times per day, 7 of my own pins and 3 of other peoples. I aim to pin my most popular content first, found in my Google or Pinterest analytics. Then I pin seasonal content, and then lastly, my new content. I primarily focus on personal boards instead of group boards and I check my Tailwind stats one time per month to inform me on how it’s working. I check my analytics to see how my pins are performing there as well.
Anything that might interest someone who is interested in blue stilettos is likely fair game. Pinterest is fairly lenient here because of the way keyword targeting works, but if you get too out there, say, targeting, “DIY planters,” your Pin will be rejected. Pinterest suggests that 100 keywords is the sweet spot, but you can get results with fewer.
Sure, we’ve just told you that Pinterest is a visual medium—but great visuals alone are not enough to create serious engagement. Make the most of the description field to tell viewers exactly what they will get if they click through to the linked content on your site. Make sure to include your most important keywords to help your Pins appear in search (but, of course, be sure to do this in a natural and helpful way rather than engaging in keyword stuffing).

Think of Pinterest as a bookmarking tool that people use to plan their lives. People typically save - or “pin” in Pinterest jargon - images they find on the web or on Pinterest itself to different boards (collections of images around a specific topic). The pictures are clickable and link back to a webpage where further information about the image topic can be found.
With 200 million monthly users, Pinterest may not be a social media behemoth like Facebook, but it’s an important social platform with deep penetration in valuable demographics. Half of all U.S. millennials use Pinterest, for instance. But it’s not just young people saving their ideas on the network: 68 percent of U.S. women between the ages of 25 and 54 use Pinterest, too. And while it’s true that the network does have more female users than male, 40 percent of new users are men.

Start by seeding your boards with amazing content. Check out some of the most popular boards for ideas and inspiration. Don’t just focus on your specific niche. Try to find aspects of your niche that apply to the general public. For example, if you are an internet marketing business, you may want to search out and pin marketing infographics or how-to images.
BUT, you can only target visitors if you first install the Conversion Tracking code on your site. Before you run screaming from the terror that is “code,” let me assure you – it is very simple, especially if you use WordPress. The code, which you get at Ads > Conversion Tracking, just needs to go on every page of your site in thetag. If you install a plugin such as Insert Headers and Footers, it will take you all of thirty seconds. Naturally, it only begins collecting data on visitors the day it’s installed – so do it now!
Alisa Meredith is the Content Marketing Manager at Tailwind – a Pinterest and Instagram scheduler and analytics platform. She is a sought-after speaker and teacher on Pinterest and Promoted Pins in particular, having spoken at Social Media Marketing World, Agents of Change and appearing on The Art of Paid Traffic and Social Pros podcasts. Alisa has invested heavily in becoming an expert in her craft – realizing (and loving) the fact that the learning never ends!  She lives in coastal North Carolina with her pampered pets Spike (who only eats eggs and Spam), Pepe the couchpotato Cavapoo, and more cats than she’d like to admit to.

You can start using Jarvee from just $19.99 a month, which makes it an affordable option. It’s a great alternative if you’re still small and don’t want to throw too much into third-party promotion. At the other end of the scale, Jarvee also has packages that accommodate for 150+ accounts, so if you’re a big business and are looking to outsource on a much larger scale, Jarvee has this option as well.
I have a site selling purebred and designer puppies. I’ve really been using Pinterest as a way to share great photos of puppies, but after reading this article, I will have a more focused and targeted approach. The puppies get lots of attention as it is, just trying to figure out how to convert that into puppy adoptions now. Thanks for the good read!
Pinterest is always testing new algorithms.  A few months ago there was a rumor about the first 5 pins that were better, but that’s no longer the case. Because they started noticing that people were not pinning their 5 best pins first and they shut it down because we were prioritizing bad pins. It all changed within two months which is why the emails you can sign up for are so important.
Something I’ve been struggling to figure out is how to pin many pins a day, while keeping a good chunk of them as pins from my own content. I only publish new content once a week. Let’s say I want to post 50% my content and 50% of others’, I would only be pinning two pins per day (one for my new post and one of someone else). Am I supposed to be pinning older content that’s already in those boards? If so, how often should I be doing that? I just don’t understand how people say to pin X number of pins per day and X amount should be your own content. Help! Thanks, Rachel
Great suggestions, Patricia – and this conversation has made me pay much closer attention to what I’m re-pinning now. I always check to see that the pin links back to a valid website. Recently I’ve seen quite a few images that just link back to the “Google Images” search page, and I definitely don’t re-pin those because it seems like that image was likely just lifted from Google.
Pinterest does not offer the option to automatically sort boards alphabetically. There are unofficial browser extensions that may be able to alphabetise boards; however, these extensions are not endorsed by Pinterest and should be used with caution. Alternatively, you can manually organise your boards alphabetically by dragging and dropping them into the desired order.
By tracking and understanding Pinners’ evolving interests, tastes, and preferences, the Pinterest Taste Graph offers an expansive collection of 5,000 interests and categories in the Pinterest Ads Manager. This allows advertisers to reach more specific, niche, obscure audiences. The more Pinners search, save, and click, the more refined the targeting (because Pinterest can more easily suggest new categories and interests), and the more accurate the data.
When you follow and interact with other Pinterest users and their accounts, you’re able to initiate and maintain personal relationships between them and your business. This type of engagement has the potential to make your followers feel a level of loyalty towards your brand that keeps them coming back to your profile for inspiration, ideas, and to buy products.
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