Facebook, Google, Instagram – all major sources of traffic are constantly evolving. Pinterest, however, changes more rapidly than all these three put together. At least, it often feels that way. Every 2 months or so, I see them testing out new features (as I have quite the big business account, I probably see some features that never get rolled out to average users).
@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right.
Hi Elna, this was great info. I’m just starting out using Pinterest for a new blog. I’ve taken a few Pinterest courses that cover the Pinterest side of things, but one thing that I’m a bit confused about is the best placement of the Pinterest image inside my blog post. Some blogs have a featured image at the top with a Pinterest image at the bottom, some just have a huge Pinterest image at the top…so I’m uncertain what is the best thing to do!
The end goal of using Pinterest for business is to get users to engage with and take action on your pins. Engagement can mean anything from clicking on a pin to see it in detail, saving a pin to one of their boards, sharing a pin with a peer or even trying a pin idea out for themselves. All of this helps to create brand awareness and puts users in the very beginning stages of your sales funnel.

Health & fitness are one of the most popular content categories on Pinterest. New York studio Kettlebell Kickboxing has built a strong profile on Pinterest because they do a fantastic job describing why potential customers should come in and join them in their profile. They explain their program and why it benefits users in just a few words. Their boards also reinforce this. For example, their Kettlebell Boxing board features articles and resources about why the program works so well.


I think the underlying major issue here is that NO ONE marketing tactic works. If it did, we’d all stick to enhancing our websites to be the best they could be. But no – blogs became popular because you could engage the consumer in a “conversation” via comments and they seem to lure more followers than a static website does. And then FB and Twitter and others, and now Pinterest. No one method seems perfect so business owners are all over the place trying every thing they can. Kind of makes you crazy…Now Pinterest is hot but as someone posted above, I, too, cannot get the search to work. I have searched on terms I know are on my own board names or pin descriptions and nothing comes up. It seems you have to know someone is on Pinterest and then begin following them… so I don’t know if a business can acquire new followers by someone generically searching on their subject matter if the search engine is so weird. But that brings me back to the Pinterest terms which say “no commercial use”!

This is a slightly less automated option, but you can upload your content to Pinterest and save it to a “Secret” board that your followers – and any other users on Pinterest – cannot see, and then when you’re ready for the pin to go live to your Pinterest audience, you can re-pin the content to a non-secret board. You can’t automate the re-pinning process, you’ll have to do it manually, but at least your content will be ready to go in Pinterest, you just have to re-pin it to a non-secret board.
Facebook, Twitter, Instagram – they’re the go-to social media platforms for dropshippers and ecommerce entrepreneurs looking to promote their brand. But, are you missing a trick by ignoring the often overlooked Pinterest? Definitely – and we’re here to equip you with everything about Pinterest- including why use Pinterest, Pinterest marketing tips, Pinterest marketing ideas and much more in order to create and execute a killer Pinterest Marketing and Pinterest Ads strategy.
One of the things I hear over and over again from Pinterest users–individuals and businesses–is that we don’t want Pinterest turning into another sales pitch ghetto as users plug their MLM products or Etsy sites or corporate product lines. The primary reason that Pinterest is so successful is its organic and cooperative nature. There are, as you listed, many ways (at least 54 it would seem) to promote a business or brand without resorting to carnival shilling and Web 1.0 scorched earth tactics.
What’s also unique about Pinterest is that when someone saves a Promoted Pin, other people see it in their feeds as well, which naturally encourages increased engagement and drives additional sales. And, although paid ad campaigns end, the Pins themselves last forever, so your ads will never stop appearing in front of users. Advertisers actually receive an average of 20% more clicks in the month after launching a Promoted Pin campaign.
Promoted Pins (aka Pinterest ads) are a great way to get your Pins seen by more people, creating new exposure for your brand. But Promoted Pins can provide exposure well beyond what you pay for. Internal Pinterest data shows that advertisers get an average of 20 percent more organic clicks in the month following the launch of a Pinterest ad campaign.
They don’t want that. They already started crawling websites, but to be on the safe side, I’d recommend creating new pins for old posts once in a while. To be quite truthful with you: My first pins sucked, my layouts have vastly improved and there is still room for more improvement. I’m sure you will have (or had) a similar journey, and why not present every blog post in the best possible light at any given time, eh?
I know, there are countless Pinterest courses out there. Some cost up to 300 USD. Are they better? I don’t know. I just know that I put everything I know about Pinterest into this guide and didn’t hold anything back. This guide is my way of saying thanks to all those countless guides that helped me starting out as a travel blogger more than 3 years ago.
To make your pins discoverable by users, optimizing your pin titles and descriptions with keywords will help Pinterest suggest your content as a search result when relevant. We discussed Keyword Research in depth in our Ultimate Guide to Keyword Research article, and although it’s tailored towards finding keywords for search engines like Google, the same principles apply to finding keywords for Pinterest. Your Pinterest marketing keyword strategy, however, should be to use as many keywords as possible whenever and wherever relevant so your content can be discoverable by as many users as possible searching for pins like yours.
Hashtags on Pinterest are used to help users identify Pins and boards about a specific topic they’re searching. When users click on a hashtag you include on a Pins, they’re brought to a page in which they can view all content ever posted on the platform tagged with that specific hashtag. You should add hashtags to your Pins, boards, and promoted content (if you have any) to ensure the greatest amount of visibility.
Pinterest is a great way for your small business to display your work and showcase your expertise in your industry. Examples include Pins with images and videos of your work, infographics, data visualizations, and blog posts. Due to the fact you might not be a recognized brand yet, doing this is important. That’s because as your business grows and you become more well-known, you’ll be more likely to be recognized as an industry leader and a business with helpful and applicable content for audience members.

If you use the Pinterest tag or send us mobile app activity, you must tell your website and app visitors that their information will be shared with third parties for online behavioral advertising, and that they can opt out of online behavioral advertising through their Pinterest personalization settings, the AdChoices website optout.aboutads.info (if you use the Pinterest tag), or their mobile ad identifier settings (if you share app activity data with us).
Pinterest image design and creation tools allow you to design, edit, create, and publish professional-looking photos and images for the platform (along with any other social media site and your website). Considering Pinterest is a visual social network where users discover eye-catching, beautiful, and creative images and videos, it’s important your content looks perfect so you can attract more followers and engagement on your profile.
Those comments don’t really address what I was bringing up. “You” (everyone) is assigning a value to all these “gorgeous images” that 99% of the time, are not being offered up for free use or license by/to Pinterest and users. Yes, “you”‘re using these valuable works to drive traffic and build a network – all commercial uses without permission from the artist.
Hi Elise – Facebook actually has an app that will let you pull your pins into your Facebook page. It’s acting really wonky for me, though, so I’ll bet they’re still working out the kinks. Here’s the link – http://apps.facebook.com/pinterestapp/ Right now that App page is just re-routing to the Pinterest business page, so there seems to be some sort of issue, but I’ve seen business Pages use it, and it’s cool! Best of luck!
To market to your target audience, you should create a Pinterest business account. As mentioned, this free account provides you with access to Pinterest Analytics (which we’ll review in more detail shortly) and other handy marketing features such as a profile that clearly states you’re a business, Pinterest widgets, and Pinterest tag. If you already have a Pinterest account and want to convert it into a Pinterest business account, you can also do that without losing any of your content or work.
Pinterest does not offer the option to automatically sort boards alphabetically. There are unofficial browser extensions that may be able to alphabetise boards; however, these extensions are not endorsed by Pinterest and should be used with caution. Alternatively, you can manually organise your boards alphabetically by dragging and dropping them into the desired order.
Hashtags work similarly to keywords in that they help your pins be discoverable by Pinterest users. In this Ultimate Marketer’s Guide to Pinterest, hashtags have been described as being more of a categorical element, and less of a tool to help your content show up in Pinterest search results, so don’t rely on them as heavily as you would keywords to get your content in front of searching users.

Remember the user experience and don’t pin the same pins back to back on the same board. New content can take a while to take off on Pinterest. When you create new content, pin it to all relevant boards at least one time per day (use a 24-hour interval between if you’re using Tailwind). Then in a couple of weeks, look in Tailwind and see how the pins performed.


Pinning from websites means you’re adding fresh content into the mix. This kind of rings a bell within the Pinterest hamster cage and says “Woah, hold on a sec, here’s someone providing something new. We like them!”. If the images you’re pinning are high quality, look amazing and link to a valuable source, Pinterest will in turn see you as a valuable user. 
So, how can your business use Pinterest as a marketing tactic to help improve your brand awareness and conversions? In this guide, we’ll cover the answer to that question as well as which Pinterest marketing strategies you should implement, how small businesses can benefit from the platform, and which tools you can use to ensure your Pinterest marketing strategy works for your business.
Pinterest helps you tell a visual story about your brand. Through pictures and videos, you’re able to show — rather than tell — your audience what you’re about as a company, the things you value, what and who you support, and the types of products and services you sell. Pinterest provides you with a unique and engaging way to introduce your small business to platform users.
You should also repin content that your audience would like to your boards. No matter how much content you create, your audience will want more. Repinning other people’s content helps give that to them. It also helps build rapport with those whose content your repinning to share with your audience. You should view your social media content as being a resource to those that follow you, so give them valuable content, both yours and others.
Yeah, Anshul, I gotta admit – I didn’t see the point of Pinterest for a long time. I thought it was another pared-down Facebook knock-off. But then I started using it and can really see all the different ways it can be used for marketing. Plus, it’s now driving over HALF the traffic to my site, and I’m just getting started! I saw an immediate boost to traffic and mailing list signups. It’s been a huge boon for me.
Thank you so much for sharing. I started my blog a few months ago and it has been a slow process for me to setup and grow my blog. I haven’t had the traffic needed so I read your article to see if you had any tips. You have definitely added insight so I will try to implement tailwind to more followers. I am so excited and ready to see my blog grow and my followers increase.

Pincodes are a unique code that work similarly to QR Codes and they help people find your brand and products on Pinterest. Pincodes can be placed on any of your physical brand assets like brochures, business cards, packaging and displays and whenever people scan them with their Pinterest app, it’ll direct them to your content destination on Pinterest.


Elna, this is a GREAT post and I love your blog. I have a question… my website doesn’t have many group boards… do you have some suggestions for me? My niche is dealing with Chronic Migraines (not fun or colorful!) and I don’t know where to start. Any help is welcome. I also have a course with a free bit, but I feel uneasy putting it in my bio…. I will have to think about that…

Content marketing partners help brands develop a strong organic presence on Pinterest. They support the entire Pinterest campaign process, from sourcing content and publishing Pins to managing interactions with Pinners. Content marketing partners have great insight into what kinds of creative work best on Pinterest, so brands that start working with a content marketing partner tend to see a big jump in Pin performance.


Pinterest operates differently than other popular social media platforms. Many people don’t use the network for broadcasting content to their followers — they use it to save valuable ideas, products, and content for a later time. Since many consumers save products to go back and purchase them later, Pinterest is the perfect tool for businesses selling products or content. In fact, 93% of users plan purchases with Pinterest, and 87% actually make a purchase because of something they saw on the platform.

When you follow and interact with other Pinterest users and their accounts, you’re able to initiate and maintain personal relationships between them and your business. This type of engagement has the potential to make your followers feel a level of loyalty towards your brand that keeps them coming back to your profile for inspiration, ideas, and to buy products.
Great post – your tips are helpful! I joined Pinterest last week (after waiting for my invitation to arrive – nothing like not getting in right away to create more desire to join – lol!), but then wasn’t sure what to do with the site once I got there! I find myself torn between keeping this truly social and fun by posting photos of great clothes, food and images from my backyard chicken blog and mixing in my marketing business. I suppose the beauty of it is having different pin boards that reflect the different interests in our lives. Thanks for the helpful post.
If you have top evergreen content or seasonal content, I highly recommend creating new pin images for those same landing posts. I have been doing this with success for the last few months and getting new visits and traffic from older blog posts that had already performed well on the platform. You can update the post with the fresh pins, as well as add them using the “+” bar on the Pinterest platform.
Don’t make this mistake because pinning everything and anything clutter your pin boards. Disjointed pins can make your boards look unorganized and lack any kind of theme. Pinterest surfers like content to be organized so that they can easily find what they are looking for. Don’t be afraid to pin interesting content your audience would enjoy, but try to keep them connected to your business.
You may notice when browsing the web now that there are various Pin This–type tools throughout online content. These Pinterest social sharing buttons are found everywhere from the beginning of a post to the images throughout the post to the end of the post next to comment and other social share buttons. In a post on the blog, Resourceful Mommy, hovering over each image provides readers with a Pin It option.

Interest targeting and keyword targeting, however, hold more value than they’re typically given on other platforms. Choosing the right keywords is essential to ensuring your content pops up in the right searches organically, and the same is true for ad targeting. Choosing the right interests will help Pinterest place your ads with users who are most likely to be interested in seeing them when browsing.
Just like other platforms, Pinterest wants you consistently using the platform! As a Pinterest marketer, avoid inconsistency and plopping a bunch of pins on the platform once a week or so. Get into a regular habit of pinning when your audience is using the platform. Using a Pinterest scheduler like Tailwind can help you choose the ‘smart’ times to pin as well as creating a queue so that you don’t have to manually pin, especially if you have difficulty staying consistent. (Psst—want to hear more about Tailwind? Check out my posts here).
I don’t even know how many studies I’ve read on which color performed better than the other and how showing faces was a no-no. Pinterest has confirmed that these are false positives. A beauty pin without a face might be quite ridiculous and even though cold tones are said to perform not as good, a pin about a trip to Antartica would probably look weird with warm colors. If you are not sure about your design, produce alternatives and show them to a control group or just dish them out and focus on the pin that performs best.
When I write my Pin descriptions that mimic the language that pinners use when writing notes to themselves, I can increase the engagement on that particular Pin. “LOVE this baked chicken recipe! Pinning for meal planning, healthy eating” is much more inviting than “Check out this baked chicken recipe on my blog! #healthyeating #mealplanning #chickenrecipes. 
Thank you so much for these tips!! I just started a Pinterest page for my blog (https://happilyunboxing.wordpress.com/) and have only been able to get three followers (after spending hours trying to figure out how to get more! I am looking forward to implementing your tips into my Pinterest strategy. If anyone wants to do a follow for follow I would love to help your Pinterest page grow as well!! @HappilyUnboxing 🙂
This will take you to Business Account Basics. If you scroll down that page, you will see a section entitled Profile. Here, you want to fill out each section, including uploading your logo where it says Picture. You also want to take a few minutes to write a description that is interesting and has a few keywords that people may use when they are searching for what your business does or the type of products your offer.
Hi! Great post! I’ve only just gotten back to Pinterest after ignoring it (I know, I know) and just started using Tailwind. What do you mean about dripping your posts over the course of a week or month? What exactly is the strategy there, and how do you do it? Also, how do you get 100 recommended optimal times with the free tailwind? They only offered me three optimal times to start. Did you just add to that general time period manually, or am I missing something? Thanks!
When pinners save something, it provides a clue to Pinterest on what the person is interested in so that they can build a unique and optimized smart feed for that individual. Also, make sure to create pins with great images to maximize the probability that people will save them. You also want to make sure your descriptions and board names are keyword optimized.
8. Not installing the “Pin It” button on your browser. While this won’t actually make you look dumb on Pinterest, it’s simply something you’ve got to do! The “pin it” button makes it super easy to curate content from any website. With a quick click, you can pin an image that contains a description and a website link. Simply highlight the text you want as the description before you click “Pin it.”
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
As detailed in this article, Why Pinterest is 1,680 Times Better than Facebook, pins are so much more discoverable on Pinterest than other social platforms and for so much longer, which is what makes the platform so advantageous for businesses to use. Unlike Facebook and Twitter, whose posts have a half-life (the time in which the post accumulates half of all its interactions) measured in minutes, the average half-life of a Pinterest post is three and a half months. Because the life of pins lasts so much longer they have a greater potential reach, so businesses can use Pinterest to interact with users much earlier in their purchasing process.
Thanks for stopping by and commenting! Yes! Join more group boards! But, I thought you were already on a lot? Oh, maybe that’s FB 🙂 As for the interval function, I had no idea that was an option in Tailwind. I honestly don’t stay in the dashboard of Tailwind so I’m learning as I go. How is that different from scheduling them based on your schedule? Is this so you don’t “spam” a group board? So far I haven’t had that happened even when I was scheduling 200 pins a day. I’ll go over to Lady Boss League and find that post! Thanks
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