So, how can your business use Pinterest as a marketing tactic to help improve your brand awareness and conversions? In this guide, we’ll cover the answer to that question as well as which Pinterest marketing strategies you should implement, how small businesses can benefit from the platform, and which tools you can use to ensure your Pinterest marketing strategy works for your business.
People use Pinterest for different reasons than they use networks like Facebook and Instagram. Pinterest is a network where people look for inspiration, including specifically seeking out ideas about new products to buy. That means they are excited to see posts from brands in their feeds. According to eMarketer, only Facebook outranks Pinterest in terms of influencing U.S. social media users’ purchasing decisions.
Hi Elna, this was great info. I’m just starting out using Pinterest for a new blog. I’ve taken a few Pinterest courses that cover the Pinterest side of things, but one thing that I’m a bit confused about is the best placement of the Pinterest image inside my blog post. Some blogs have a featured image at the top with a Pinterest image at the bottom, some just have a huge Pinterest image at the top…so I’m uncertain what is the best thing to do!
With these, expect to see higher CTRs; however, be sure that your ad-to-landing-page experience and messaging is seamless, or the influx of more clicks can also lead to higher bounce rates and wasted budget. For a better rate of success, test One-tap Promoted Pins with warmer audiences so that they are more likely to convert after they click through.

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Since many Pinterest users utilize Pinterest to save creative ideas, informative content and unique products to go back and purchase them later, Pinterest is an ideal tool for businesses selling services, products or promoting your content. In fact, 93 percent of users plan purchases with Pinterest, and 87 percent actually make a purchase because of something they saw on the platform.

One trick is to use various quotes from your most recent blog post or testimonials about your recent product and link to the website page many different times. You can also Pin the same Pin to different boards. For example, if you write a blog post about buying the best homeowners insurance, that can go on a board that only holds your blog posts, it can also go on a board that talks about financial planning and a board that talks about homeownership.


Pinterest has confirmed they do crawl the website linked to the pin. So, it’s quite important that your pin & pin description match the actual content on your website. For now, they are probably just scraping the metadata (descriptions, title, etc). But still, it’s nice to know that an SEO optimized article will also send a stronger signal to Pinterest.
By the way, I would like to subscribe to your email list and get the Pin Promoter Planner but I have no idea on how to do it. I can’t seem to find the link. Hopefully you will be able to add me to your list. I just decided that I would need to focus on one social media for a while and I have chosen Pinterest becuase I heard so many things about getting many viewers thru this platform.
Technically, we are building out an internet scale personalized recommendation engine in 22+ languages, which requires a deep understanding of the users and content on our platform.  As an engineer on the Pin Knowledge team, you’ll work on content classification, user modeling, personalization and ranking. Engineers of this team often make measurably positive impact on hundreds of millions of users with improved machine learning modeling and featurization breakthroughs.
I find that one mistake people often make is to leave out keywords on their boards. Board names are searchable (though significantly less than actual pins). It’s vital to choose board names with a strong SEO. For instance, ‘yummmy’ is not a good board name. It has no searchable context. Choose something like, ‘dessert recipes’ or even more specific, ‘pumpkin desserts’ instead.
Pinterest allows you to target Promoted Pin Ad Groups to your own audiences. These warm audiences tend to convert to website visits, sales, and email signups at a higher rate than do strangers (cold audiences). In fact, some (including ME) have seen click-through rates 3X when using visitor targeting. They’re very easy to set up at Ads > Audiences.
@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right.
Enter Pingroupie. This free tool’s entire purpose is to list group boards that are currently live. You could reach out to these board owners and see if they’d be open to doing a group board with you, or if they’re in need of contributors like you. If you’re able to contribute relevant, non-spammy content of your own, there could be a lot to gain for your brand.
Pins targeted by keyword only often show up in the home feed, too! Knowing that “keyword” targeting has more to do with the Pinner’s overall Pinterest behavior than their in-the-moment search really frees you up to go broad with your keywords. In fact, if you keep too tight with your keyword targeting, you may find it hard to get the impressions you need in order to evaluate your campaign.

I know, there are countless Pinterest courses out there. Some cost up to 300 USD. Are they better? I don’t know. I just know that I put everything I know about Pinterest into this guide and didn’t hold anything back. This guide is my way of saying thanks to all those countless guides that helped me starting out as a travel blogger more than 3 years ago.

This has a very important implication: The more engaged and loyal your followers are, the faster your pin will take off. Pinterest has said the number of followers did not matter as much as the percental engagement. This, however, also means that users who built their accounts organically (as opposed to follow/unfollow techniques), will have a bigger benefit.
Start Pinterest group Boards. Besides seeking membership in a popular Pinterest group Board, you might also seek to start one and invite your customers. This can help you to establish social proof, thought leadership, or perform customer research. A social proof Board could be created to invite people to show off how they use your product. A customer research Board can be used to invite customers to provide input on future or current products.
To put it legally: Pinterest is an equal opportunity employer and makes employment decisions on the basis of merit. We want to have the best qualified people in every job. Pinterest policy prohibits unlawful discrimination based on race, color, religion or religious creed, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions), sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, gender expression, age, marital status, status as a protected veteran, physical or mental disability, medical condition, genetic information or characteristics (or those of a family member), or any other consideration made unlawful by applicable federal, state, or local laws. It also prohibits discrimination based on a perception that anyone has any of those characteristics, or is associated with a person who has or is perceived as having any of those characteristics. All such discrimination is unlawful. Pinterest is committed to compliance with all applicable laws providing equal employment opportunities. This commitment applies to all persons involved in the operations of Pinterest and prohibits unlawful discrimination by any employee of Pinterest.

Alisa Meredith is the Content Marketing Manager at Tailwind – a Pinterest and Instagram scheduler and analytics platform. She is a sought-after speaker and teacher on Pinterest and Promoted Pins in particular, having spoken at Social Media Marketing World, Agents of Change and appearing on The Art of Paid Traffic and Social Pros podcasts. Alisa has invested heavily in becoming an expert in her craft – realizing (and loving) the fact that the learning never ends!  She lives in coastal North Carolina with her pampered pets Spike (who only eats eggs and Spam), Pepe the couchpotato Cavapoo, and more cats than she’d like to admit to.
The Pinterest Analytics Tool: How to Use It for Business: Are you struggling to measure your Pinterest efforts? The new Pinterest Analytics tool gives you access to a variety of data, including how potential customers interact with your pins beyond your website. This article shows how the Pinterest Analytics features help you get the most out of your Pinterest marketing.
If you already have a Pinterest business account, make note of the traffic that Pinterest is currently sending you. You should track progress on a regular basis - it tells you if your marketing efforts are paying off, or not. This also applies to newbies on Pinterest - even though you do not have any historical data to benchmark against, monthly tracking will be helpful to monitor future progress.
When pinners save something, it provides a clue to Pinterest on what the person is interested in so that they can build a unique and optimized smart feed for that individual. Also, make sure to create pins with great images to maximize the probability that people will save them. You also want to make sure your descriptions and board names are keyword optimized.
Anything that might interest someone who is interested in blue stilettos is likely fair game. Pinterest is fairly lenient here because of the way keyword targeting works, but if you get too out there, say, targeting, “DIY planters,” your Pin will be rejected. Pinterest suggests that 100 keywords is the sweet spot, but you can get results with fewer.

I feel like Pinterest runs the risk of becoming cluttered if we encourage businesses to use it when it might not be the best channel for them. Part of content marketing is making sure your content fits your channel, and filling up Pinterest with promotional noise is likely to turn users off and could ruin the service altogether. I wrote a piece on that today on the D Custom blog…http://www.dcustom.com/three-things-youre-doing-wrong-on-pinterest/


The Mojo Spa in Illinois has a very unique, distinctive brand. They create good-for-you cosmetics in an affordable price range, and the creator of the company calls herself the “Willy Wonka of beauty.” Their Pinterest does a remarkable job of capturing the whimsical and wonderfully quirky nature of their brand while promoting their products simultaneously. Just in case users aren’t familiar with their brand, they give you a summary of who they are in their profile bio:
Unlike Facebook and Instagram, both heavily focused on the social interaction between the users, Pinterest is a personal and private discovery platform.  It’s all about the user. You’re allowed to dream about personal topics (and even things you DON’T want to share) like trying to get pregnant or new fitness goals, because you can create a secret board and pin to it.

Pinterest does not offer the option to automatically sort boards alphabetically. There are unofficial browser extensions that may be able to alphabetise boards; however, these extensions are not endorsed by Pinterest and should be used with caution. Alternatively, you can manually organise your boards alphabetically by dragging and dropping them into the desired order.
Pinterest is the ultimate visual search engine and the world’s catalog of ideas, and it’s the only social media platform that enables users to plan for the future rather than share the present or reflect on the past. With a Pinterest for business account, brands can create and manage a Pinterest marketing strategy that boosts brand awareness and drives traffic and conversions to their website. In this article, we discuss in detail what Pinterest marketing offers brands in terms of marketing power and what a Pinterest for business account can do for a business and their bottom line.
Just like other platforms, Pinterest wants you consistently using the platform! As a Pinterest marketer, avoid inconsistency and plopping a bunch of pins on the platform once a week or so. Get into a regular habit of pinning when your audience is using the platform. Using a Pinterest scheduler like Tailwind can help you choose the ‘smart’ times to pin as well as creating a queue so that you don’t have to manually pin, especially if you have difficulty staying consistent. (Psst—want to hear more about Tailwind? Check out my posts here).
Adding a few words of text to your images can help give an immediate idea of what the linked content is all about. For example, food-related Pins that include a short text call-out get 23 percent more clickthroughs and 31 percent more saves. But don’t go overboard, since Pinterest specifically recommends avoiding images that are too busy. This Pin from Kraft Foods uses just the right amount of text:
Pinterest allows you to target Promoted Pin Ad Groups to your own audiences. These warm audiences tend to convert to website visits, sales, and email signups at a higher rate than do strangers (cold audiences). In fact, some (including ME) have seen click-through rates 3X when using visitor targeting. They’re very easy to set up at Ads > Audiences.
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy! 
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