Create highly pinnable graphics – “long and lean” as I call them.  Some of my simplest projects have become very popular on Pinterest because I created highly pinnable collages that show multiple images from the same project.  Pinterest loves vertical images, so every post should have a pinnable vertical image that includes a high-quality image, the title of the post, and your blog name or URL in a watermark.  It’s worth the bit of extra time it takes to create these images for the return on investment – increased blog traffic!
Ads for financial products and services must clearly and prominently disclose all applicable terms and conditions as required by the local laws and regulations for any country or region your ad is targeting. Ads for consumer loans, for example, must disclose things like the APR, repayment period, fees and costs, penalties, and information about the lending institution.

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Pinterest is designed to store ideas and inspiration in a way other social media sites aren’t. Users are encouraged to organize what they find into different board names for easy navigation, and most pinners are primarily on Pinterest seeking and saving what they want to see; they generally don’t care if other people see what they've tagged or archived, because it’s just not about generating discussion or exchanging information.
One of the newer concepts to Pinterest is this: Is it better to repin a pin or save directly from a website? I know that’s confusing, so let me break it down. If we want to reshare our content on Pinterest (and you should—read here how I use Tailwind’s SmartLoop to do this), is it better to one, ‘repin’ or save on the Pinterest platform, or two, save from the website using the save tool (or alternatively, schedule a pin on Tailwind).

For me, it’s more budget friendly when I use Tailwind to pin to my group boards. With Tailwind I pin around 50-100 a day. I only pay $9.99 a month for unlimited pins. With Board Booster, I’d have to pay something like $84/month! So with Board Booster, I only pin 45 pins a day which is only $10/month. It’s just more cost effective for me. It may not be for you. Also, I would change that ratio to more pins of YOUR blog and less of other ones. As for follower growth, I don’t suspect a scheduling tool would help; getting more on group boards yes, making your blog Pinterest friendly and your pins Pin friendly.
As we discussed at the beginning of the article, content on Pinterest successfully gains engagement and shows up as a search result for months, so the content of your titles and descriptions need to be able to withstand that test of time. Titles and descriptions that are evergreen – as in, they don’t date themselves or refer to a very specific day or time of the year – have greater lasting potential. Some content on Pinterest will be season specific, such as content for recurring holidays, and that’s okay, but think about how you can even make descriptions for seasonal pins stay relevant for the same time of year next year.

The problem is, that people don’t get to pass it up. If they have chosen to use Flickr to display their work, for example, someone can go “pin” their image without the artist ever knowing, until they find it pinned all over the place and hosted on blogs. When licensing work, they may even choose to pass up a group they disagree with, say, AARP for example, yet that group can create a board to promote their work and go out and grab any image they like from the net. What then? What makes “pinning” inherently different than taking any image from anywhere and putting it on your website?
I’m not an alarmist. I like safe, simple rules and guidelines that stay consistent over time. I don’t think Pinterest is any different. Over time, Pinterest marketing has evolved (hey, hashtags) but the foundation of keywords and vertical images has not. Human interaction with Pinterest has changed. In this post, I’ll be sharing the main principles to a solid Pinterest marketing strategy.

The next part of this step is to confirm your website. In the first step, you were asked to insert your website into your profile details. While that shows up publicly on your account (and might even send blog traffic your way from people that found you and loved what you pin), Pinterest needs to know that you actually own the account for them to give you sensitive details about it.

Pinterest boards group together content with the same theme. For example, DAVIDsTEA — which has corporate partnerships — categorizes its boards based on seasonal teas, cooking with tea, tea-infused cocktails, and more. DAVIDsTEA’s boards are carefully pieced together to include the types of information their audience will enjoy. In addition to creating awesome boards, be sure to link all the content in your boards to your website or a landing page — within reason, of course — so you’re reiterating your messaging, as well as your organization.
There are two types of Save Buttons: Automatic Buttons which show the Pinterest Save Button icon on your images automatically so users know they can save that image to Pinterest, and there’s also the Hover Buttons which show the Pinterest Save Button icon on your images when users’ cursors hover over your images, so they’re a little more discreet but still signal to your visitors that the image can be saved to their Pinterest boards.
Users will never even see your image if you don’t have the right keywords and copy to tell them (and the Pinterest algorithm) what you have in store. Pin descriptions, board descriptions, profile descriptions, and board titles should all creatively include keywords for that very reason—but avoid writing copy that looks and feels like low-effort keyword stuffing.
No matter what you’re advertising — and no matter what platform you’re advertising on — it’s essential to include a call-to-action to encourage your audience to take the next step. By simply adding “Sign up”, “Learn more”, or “Visit site” to your Pinterest ad, you can inspire users to take action. By doing so you can increase conversions by up to 80%!
Your growth story is very inspiring. You already had over 600 followers though! That’s a lot compared to my measly 30. Do you think your strategies help from the very beginning? I’m probably still too new to contribute to group pages, though I feel I have valuable content. If you have advice for beginners that is different from what you’ve already mentioned, I’d really appreciate hearing it!
Pinterest also offers Actalike audience targeting, which is similar to Facebook’s Lookalike feature and Google’s Similar feature. A major difference, though, is that Actalike only requires an audience size of 100 users to create the audience, while Facebook and Google require much larger audiences. Also, with layering and variance of 1% to 10%, your Actalike audience closely resembles your pre-existing audience list, with similar engagement activity. This allows for personalized targeting of new, niche audiences.
About Blog Everything you need to know about Marketing opportunities on Pinterest. Follow all things Pinterest on MarketingLand.com. From news about product and website or new pin features, to advertising options and analytics from the visual social media platform. Get started marketing your products or business on Pinterest with How To guides, tips and tactics from successful pinterest marketers.
You mention linking our Pinterest to our Facebook pages, but if we are a business and have a Facebook page, how can we link our Pinterest since pages don’t really have their own log-in?? If I try to link to Facebook, it picks up my personal Facebook account (and I’m admin of my page.) Do you know if an interface with Facebook pages for Pinterest is coming? Or I’m just going to post links on Facebook to my Pinterest boards is my plan. Thanks for the article-lots of great info!
Thanks for all the tips here. I’ve been growing on pinterest, too, but still need to accelerate things. I’ve been finding it challenging to get into more of the top decor boards (I do flooring) as many are closed to new pinners). I’ve also been collaborating with a friend of mine who has a larger following and more group boards, and we are helping each other.
While creating and sharing content for your Pinterest profile and marketing to users, be sure to keep your target audience in mind. Similar to the way you would when creating new products, developing your branding, or posting to other social networks, you want to ensure you’re pushing out content that appeals to your target audience, current customers, and buyer personas on Pinterest.
High quality is a must, as is size. Vertical Pins (2:30 – 600px x 900px) work well because they take up more space, making them stand out. Contrast these with square images (600px x 600px) to make your content eye-catching on the discovery feed. Be sure that your images (and website for that matter) are mobile-friendly: over 85% of searches are in the App.
There are two types of Save Buttons: Automatic Buttons which show the Pinterest Save Button icon on your images automatically so users know they can save that image to Pinterest, and there’s also the Hover Buttons which show the Pinterest Save Button icon on your images when users’ cursors hover over your images, so they’re a little more discreet but still signal to your visitors that the image can be saved to their Pinterest boards.
People use Pinterest for different reasons than they use networks like Facebook and Instagram. Pinterest is a network where people look for inspiration, including specifically seeking out ideas about new products to buy. That means they are excited to see posts from brands in their feeds. According to eMarketer, only Facebook outranks Pinterest in terms of influencing U.S. social media users’ purchasing decisions.
Before choosing keywords, do your research. Check keywords using Google’s AdWords Keyword Planner, KeywordSpy or whatever tool you’re comfortable using. Also, do some research on Pinterest. Enter the keywords you’re considering using and see what comes up. People use Pinterest search differently than they use Google and other search engines, so it’s helpful to see the phrases the Pinterest community uses.

The pin/save button appears directly on your website’s product pages, making it easy for browsers to pin (and share) a link to their own Boards. 5x more easy to be precise. Immediately you’re making it simple for potential customers to engage with you and you’re gaining knowledge of who has pinned content from your website; providing you with an opportunity to engage right back.
You may be right BUT . . . . I’ve peppered my Pinterest boards with links to resources (both mine and others) as well as entertaining pins related to my psychotherapy services and I’m getting a surprising amount of traffic from it. If the auto mechanic or lawyer chose to link back to resources, inspiration, great tips and tools, as well as entertainment . . . I suspect that he, too, would get traffic. For example, as an family law attorney might post information via images related to divorce, mediation, family therapy, custody, etc. And, an auto mechanic could post information via images related to auto maintenance, accident – prevention tips, insurance, car rental, AAA, etc.
Great post! I started using Pinterest over a week ago and my traffic increased dramatically! I really didn’t expect it! I have a little question… when I pin an image from my blog and get 100 repins for example, let’s say that this results in 500 views on my blog… shouldn’t I be gettin more and more traffic on the following days? I’ve noticed that my blog traffic only increaces when I pin…but I don’t understand how come my traffic is not multiplying as a result of the many repins I get. Instead my traffic goes back down until the next time I pin…

Kate Ahl is the owner of Simple Pin Media. She helps bloggers and business owners manage their Pinterest page while teaching bloggers and online entrepreneurs how to use Pinterest to market their business. Her philosophy is simple, actionable and uses data based decisions to create the best Pinterest marketing strategy. She runs Simple Pin Media out of a She Shed in her garden, loves good cheese, great friends, and sparkly drinks.
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
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