Pinterest loves new pins. So, if you could, you should be sharing new pins, preferably all pointing to your website all day. BUT at the same time, you want an engaged audience. The way the smart feed works now, users who repinned one of the pins on your boards are more likely to see more of your pins. So, making use of proven content from other people (by repining) can still help you gain traction.
Thanks for the advice, Tamara. I’ve been marketing on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and even a little on Flickr. And I’m working on producing blog content now. I knew marketing efforts take longer than a month to be most effective- but after a month I am looking for ways to make improvements and how to better approach my marketing strategy. I feel like my actual marketing messages aren’t ideal- so I’m working on building the blog and filling it with useful content. I’m going to be blogging about what’s going on in our shop, our inspiration, free craft tutorials and crafty business advice- I think that will help with establishing myself as an expert and also building a stronger following. What do you think?
Before choosing keywords, do your research. Check keywords using Google’s AdWords Keyword Planner, KeywordSpy or whatever tool you’re comfortable using. Also, do some research on Pinterest. Enter the keywords you’re considering using and see what comes up. People use Pinterest search differently than they use Google and other search engines, so it’s helpful to see the phrases the Pinterest community uses.
Then, I’m about to help you. Instead of rehearsing all the old news (like updating your profile pic and getting a business account. duh!) I tried to focus on very actionable items. Unique techniques I use every day that helped me drive a constant 5,000 visitors to my site. each. day. The information is based on official interviews and quite a couple of e-mail conversations with Pinterest (so no urban myths, sorry!), but also empirical evidence from stuff that worked out for me.
Same applies to on-site content. Google is already displaying tons of content directly in the search, Facebook also has tons of features preventing people from ever leaving their app and Pinterest is already starting with rich pins for recipes. I believe they might try to offer publishers the “opportunity” to create rich content within the Pinterest app. But no visits to your blog means no money, so you will have to look for different traffic sources or different ways to make money.
How are you and your family doing, I hope all is well. My name is Larry Ward Sr. I was searching through Pinterest for boards to follow. I came across your blogging post, I’m interested in being a blogger. I don’t have any experience how can I learn how to write good blogs. This is something I have been wanting to do for a very long time. Any advice you have to get me started on my journey would be appreciated. I love the details and sources that you provide. Thank you for all your help sincerely
Their pricing is, again, affordable and reasonable. What’s different about FollowingLike is that you only have to pay a one-off fee. Unlike other automated bots that are going to set you back every month, FollowingLike charges you once. You can buy the one account version for $51 right now. If you’re looking for them to manage more than one account for you, this will set you back $73. It’s worth your money if you invest in the unlimited accounts version. They offer this for a one-time fee of $126, or if you want to pay yearly, it’s $88. Either way, their deals are reasonable.
Start Pinterest group Boards. Besides seeking membership in a popular Pinterest group Board, you might also seek to start one and invite your customers. This can help you to establish social proof, thought leadership, or perform customer research. A social proof Board could be created to invite people to show off how they use your product. A customer research Board can be used to invite customers to provide input on future or current products.
The last step is to create your first board. To make it easier for users to find your content, such as blogs, special offers, new products, and more — create a business board first and then add relevant Pins. For example, for blog content you’ve posted on your first board, you can then create feature images for each blog post and include a summary of the post in the description to pique user interest.

One of the newer concepts to Pinterest is this: Is it better to repin a pin or save directly from a website? I know that’s confusing, so let me break it down. If we want to reshare our content on Pinterest (and you should—read here how I use Tailwind’s SmartLoop to do this), is it better to one, ‘repin’ or save on the Pinterest platform, or two, save from the website using the save tool (or alternatively, schedule a pin on Tailwind).
Optimize your website content for Pinterest sharing (Part Two): Consider watermarking your images, or adding text to them. If you’re using your own images on Pinterest, one of the best ways to help your image stand out is by adding a clear description to the image itself, or adding a watermark with your business name. Make sure it’s clear, but that it doesn’t block out the main subject of the photo.
The pin/save button appears directly on your website’s product pages, making it easy for browsers to pin (and share) a link to their own Boards. 5x more easy to be precise. Immediately you’re making it simple for potential customers to engage with you and you’re gaining knowledge of who has pinned content from your website; providing you with an opportunity to engage right back.

My best Pinterest tip is to be focused. Once I identified WHY I use Pinterest, I was able to focus my boards and pins on what really matters – growing my Pinterest following, and attracting other bloggers and prospective clients. Each time I click to pin or repin I ask myself, “Is this pin of value to my target audience?” If the answer isn’t yes, I don’t pin it.
Once you sign up for a Pinterest account, you’re able to begin sharing content and, therefore, social media marketing on the platform. You have the option to upload your business’ content from your computer or mobile device, Pin content you find on the platform, or add content you find on the web using the Pinterest browser button. You can also follow the boards of your friends and competitors, “Like”, and comment on others’ Pins, re-Pin (or repost) content, and share links to your website and blog in your Pins.

The problem is, that people don’t get to pass it up. If they have chosen to use Flickr to display their work, for example, someone can go “pin” their image without the artist ever knowing, until they find it pinned all over the place and hosted on blogs. When licensing work, they may even choose to pass up a group they disagree with, say, AARP for example, yet that group can create a board to promote their work and go out and grab any image they like from the net. What then? What makes “pinning” inherently different than taking any image from anywhere and putting it on your website? 

Opt for a content-based approach. I remember seeing a recipe for a breakfast parfait and saving it, only to realize later on that the recipe was from Fage, a Greek yogurt brand, and it featured a specific flavor of yogurt none of their competitors had. It was a smart move, because content like recipes and DIY tutorials perform great on Pinterest. If you can feature your products in a similar way, this is a good strategy to try, especially for brand awareness campaigns.


The content saved by users is distributed to a wider audience by the Pinterest algorithm in people’s home feed and search results. As a business, your aim is to make your content inspirational and discoverable, so that it gets seen, saved (i.e. shared) and clicked as often as possible. Helpful content, keywords, and high-quality images are essential ingredients for success on Pinterest.

The more boards you have, the more pins your can schedule. It also depends on the group board you belong to. If there are only 10 contributors, your pins may flood their feed. If that’s the case you just have to pop in to your boards and not put those types of boards in your schedule. I belong to over a 100 group boards, but not all of them are in my Tailwind schedule. Many of them only have 5 or 10 contributors, so I don’t pin to them or have stopped pinning to them until they get more contributors.


While this is a comprehensive list I am pretty disappointed that there is absolutely no mention of the requirement to respect copyright and ask people first. I don’t have time to read all your posts re Pinterest. ….as you brushed off the person who asked about this. However…..I have a strong aversion to people not being informed clearly of the need to respect copyright. Especially since you have made it clear, and I know others are already using their boards commercially to make money from technically stolen prints.Pinterest has yet to have a TOC and system that ensures copyright is protected. They have tinkered but not fixed.People offering advise in my opinion have a duty to push for a respect of copyright.Links back….no not after the first repin it would seem, when Pinterest then divert the links to make them money.

By choosing the right category for your content to be shared in, your Pins and boards will become more searchable for users looking to discover content similar to that of your business. Users can search for specific categories on Pinterest or simply go to the “Categories” section of any profile on the platform to view all content related to the topic they’re searching.

The problem is, that people don’t get to pass it up. If they have chosen to use Flickr to display their work, for example, someone can go “pin” their image without the artist ever knowing, until they find it pinned all over the place and hosted on blogs. When licensing work, they may even choose to pass up a group they disagree with, say, AARP for example, yet that group can create a board to promote their work and go out and grab any image they like from the net. What then? What makes “pinning” inherently different than taking any image from anywhere and putting it on your website?
To market to your target audience, you should create a Pinterest business account. As mentioned, this free account provides you with access to Pinterest Analytics (which we’ll review in more detail shortly) and other handy marketing features such as a profile that clearly states you’re a business, Pinterest widgets, and Pinterest tag. If you already have a Pinterest account and want to convert it into a Pinterest business account, you can also do that without losing any of your content or work.
Similar to other advertising channels, Pinterest has its own Tag, which is a piece of code that is applied to your website. With the Tag, you will be able to better measure the effectiveness of your campaigns, understand customer paths from engagements to conversions, define audiences for remarketing and track a number of events such as page visits, category views, searches, cart additions, checkouts, video views, signups and leads.
We want people on Pinterest to understand who's promoting content. You can't manage more than one advertiser through a single account or change the advertiser on an account. You also can't create boards for someone else (for example, if you're an agency) and promote stuff from those boards. Instead, you can help someone else promote ads from their own account.
Health & fitness are one of the most popular content categories on Pinterest. New York studio Kettlebell Kickboxing has built a strong profile on Pinterest because they do a fantastic job describing why potential customers should come in and join them in their profile. They explain their program and why it benefits users in just a few words. Their boards also reinforce this. For example, their Kettlebell Boxing board features articles and resources about why the program works so well.

Anything that might interest someone who is interested in blue stilettos is likely fair game. Pinterest is fairly lenient here because of the way keyword targeting works, but if you get too out there, say, targeting, “DIY planters,” your Pin will be rejected. Pinterest suggests that 100 keywords is the sweet spot, but you can get results with fewer.
If you already have a Pinterest business account, make note of the traffic that Pinterest is currently sending you. You should track progress on a regular basis - it tells you if your marketing efforts are paying off, or not. This also applies to newbies on Pinterest - even though you do not have any historical data to benchmark against, monthly tracking will be helpful to monitor future progress.
First, complete your profile describing your business including relevant keywords that users will use to search. Next, you are going to want to upload a good logo as your profile picture. In addition, create minimum 10-12 boards and pin at least 9 pins on each board. As a result, this gives the board an active appearance and people will be more apt to explore your board.
Sure, we’ve just told you that Pinterest is a visual medium—but great visuals alone are not enough to create serious engagement. Make the most of the description field to tell viewers exactly what they will get if they click through to the linked content on your site. Make sure to include your most important keywords to help your Pins appear in search (but, of course, be sure to do this in a natural and helpful way rather than engaging in keyword stuffing).
I’m so excited to get started with Pinterest that I’d like ask if you’d mind referring me – kurt@lavetainn.com. I’m working with a programmer to build an Art Gallery for the under-exposed artists in my community and I think Pinterest is a better (and much cheaper) solution. But thats just for starters. I’ve rarely used images from websites on my Facebook page because I felt it was unethical to just grab images and put them on my wall (maybe that is stupid) but with images having easy tracking back to its source, this site changes the way I feel about that.
If you’ve ever wanted a way to boost impulse buys, Buyable Pins are the answer. As users browse through Pinterest, creating boards and getting ideas, they’ll be able to see your product, the price, and purchase it all with a few quick taps or clicks on their mobile device. They don’t even have to re-enter their payment information each time they buy, making the process go quickly—before they get the chance to talk themselves out of it.
First, do some searching on Pinterest so that you understand how Pinterest searching works. Then, take note of which results show up first and how the Pinterest feed organizes the pins and boards. Notice which keywords are suggested as being together automatically and which of these keywords are relevant to your pins. You want to do these searches on both desktop and mobile devices so that you understand what looks different on each device.
Oftentimes, our own audiences are pretty small, which means we can’t get the reach and clicks we need. So, starting a new ad group using an actalike is a great way to find people with similar interests and behaviors and increase your impressions 30X while keeping CTR high. Start with a 1% similarity and branch out from there if you need still more.
Many business owners underrate Pinterest in its power to be used as an effective digital marketing tool. Considering Pinterest user base of 70 million along with the credit of being the fastest growing social media platform in the world, there is immense potential for businesses to tap Pinterest effectively to visually advertise their products, drive traffic to company website and boost sales.
Something I’ve been struggling to figure out is how to pin many pins a day, while keeping a good chunk of them as pins from my own content. I only publish new content once a week. Let’s say I want to post 50% my content and 50% of others’, I would only be pinning two pins per day (one for my new post and one of someone else). Am I supposed to be pinning older content that’s already in those boards? If so, how often should I be doing that? I just don’t understand how people say to pin X number of pins per day and X amount should be your own content. Help! Thanks, Rachel
Tip! It’s a good idea to follow popular boards because they are relevant to your industry and business as opposed to “just because” they are the most popular. If your business has literally nothing to do with wedding fashion, you can do yourself a favor and follow the boards that have a following closer to yours. Those are the people you want to connect with anyway.
Similar to other advertising channels, Pinterest has its own Tag, which is a piece of code that is applied to your website. With the Tag, you will be able to better measure the effectiveness of your campaigns, understand customer paths from engagements to conversions, define audiences for remarketing and track a number of events such as page visits, category views, searches, cart additions, checkouts, video views, signups and leads.
How to Start a Pinterest Board That Succeeds: Are your prospects on Pinterest? Do you want to start a Pinterest board? When starting on Pinterest, you’ll want to fill new boards with quality starter pins. Once you’ve launched your new boards, it’s important to pin more content to them daily. This article shows how to develop Pinterest boards for your business.
Thanks so much Beth for this article! I have used Pinterest personally but never for my business until several t-shirt designs I posted lead to orders coming in the door. We are now in the process of setting up a “business” account. This article is MOST HELPFUL! I have taken notes and plan on using SO MANY of your ideas. We have been in business 20 years but I feel like such a newbie with all this social media stuff!!! Exciting to start learning from you.

How to Start a Pinterest Board That Succeeds: Are your prospects on Pinterest? Do you want to start a Pinterest board? When starting on Pinterest, you’ll want to fill new boards with quality starter pins. Once you’ve launched your new boards, it’s important to pin more content to them daily. This article shows how to develop Pinterest boards for your business.

Good points, Beth. I also think it’s important, as I pointed out in my blog post, that if a company is using Pinterest they actually lead it back to content, whether it’s a product or service on their website or content on their blog. It’s a perfect example for companies to implement a content marketing strategy and promote their brand through providing useful information (coupled with eye-catching images) and becoming a trusted resource. It’s so much less “in your face” and lessens the risk of potential customers getting annoyed with you spamming Pinterest with promos or pointless contests.
You’re welcome Candice. Promoted Pins has now changed quite a bit from when I first wrote this article. They now have two types, cost per engagement (CPE) and cost per click (CPC). You used also be able to find out the search volume of search terms before placing an order. That’s no longer the case. Unfortunately only businesses with a U.S IP address and U.S. credit card are able to use Promoted Pins. It’s not very fair… :(
SocialPilot Lite is free to schedule up to 30 pins and post 10 times per day. Their individual plan is $10 a month and comes with considerably more. You can schedule up to 1000 posts in your queue and post 50 times per day. The content discovery tools are limited while the analytics they provide are non-existent in this basic package. Tailwind and even Buffer have a wider variety of Pinterest automation tools available for this pricing level.

If you have top evergreen content or seasonal content, I highly recommend creating new pin images for those same landing posts. I have been doing this with success for the last few months and getting new visits and traffic from older blog posts that had already performed well on the platform. You can update the post with the fresh pins, as well as add them using the “+” bar on the Pinterest platform.

@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right.
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