Beth, fab tips! Instantly it struck me that photographers like myself, need to rethink how we present our online content so we can have our work shown without feeling marketers are using it to pretty their brand image and we receive little $ benefit down the line. Photographers spend not only their time — but thousands of dollars a year on equipment, software, make-up crew, props and workshops to generate a single image. A $6k lens an artist buys or rents is done to define eyes and make skin come alive. So instead of whining…
To execute a winning Pinterest marketing strategy, you need to be pinning consistently to Pinterest. It’s recommended to pin between 11-20 times per day which may seem like a lot, but as outlined in this Ultimate Pinterest Marketing Guide, 80% of the content can be content you re-pin from other users on Pinterest (and thus save to your own Pinterest boards) while only 20% of it should be original content.
Pinterest loves new pins. So, if you could, you should be sharing new pins, preferably all pointing to your website all day. BUT at the same time, you want an engaged audience. The way the smart feed works now, users who repinned one of the pins on your boards are more likely to see more of your pins. So, making use of proven content from other people (by repining) can still help you gain traction.
Opt for a content-based approach. I remember seeing a recipe for a breakfast parfait and saving it, only to realize later on that the recipe was from Fage, a Greek yogurt brand, and it featured a specific flavor of yogurt none of their competitors had. It was a smart move, because content like recipes and DIY tutorials perform great on Pinterest. If you can feature your products in a similar way, this is a good strategy to try, especially for brand awareness campaigns.
Good points, Beth. I also think it’s important, as I pointed out in my blog post, that if a company is using Pinterest they actually lead it back to content, whether it’s a product or service on their website or content on their blog. It’s a perfect example for companies to implement a content marketing strategy and promote their brand through providing useful information (coupled with eye-catching images) and becoming a trusted resource. It’s so much less “in your face” and lessens the risk of potential customers getting annoyed with you spamming Pinterest with promos or pointless contests.

Pins targeted by keyword only often show up in the home feed, too! Knowing that “keyword” targeting has more to do with the Pinner’s overall Pinterest behavior than their in-the-moment search really frees you up to go broad with your keywords. In fact, if you keep too tight with your keyword targeting, you may find it hard to get the impressions you need in order to evaluate your campaign.


@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right.
Me again- going through the list now and writing some things down to keep in mind for later and making changes as I go along- care to elaborate a bit more on #44 – “Do you have a number of different ideal client personas? Create a separate board to represent each client persona, then use those boards during your sales cycle and embed them into your website pages so people are clear about the kinds of clients you’re trying to attract.”
You can also pre-populate the pin descriptions that users save to their own boards with the Pinterest Save Button. This makes it faster for users to save your images to their boards and means that all the correct, necessary and optimized information will be in the description which will make it more useful for other users who see the pin on Pinterest. If you don’t specify a description, Pinterest will pull a description from your webpage, which may not be as well optimized for Pinterest. To learn more about pre-filling your descriptions, check out this help page from Pinterest.
As you begin to use Pinterest marketing as part of your business’ marketing strategy, you may find that you need help creating amazing graphics setting up your Pinterest account or even creating the right content. Consider using a platform like Fiverr to hire an expert designer or Pinterest marketer to help you maximize your Pinterest marketing efforts.

Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!


Hashtags work similarly to keywords in that they help your pins be discoverable by Pinterest users. In this Ultimate Marketer’s Guide to Pinterest, hashtags have been described as being more of a categorical element, and less of a tool to help your content show up in Pinterest search results, so don’t rely on them as heavily as you would keywords to get your content in front of searching users.

Their pricing is, again, affordable and reasonable. What’s different about FollowingLike is that you only have to pay a one-off fee. Unlike other automated bots that are going to set you back every month, FollowingLike charges you once. You can buy the one account version for $51 right now. If you’re looking for them to manage more than one account for you, this will set you back $73. It’s worth your money if you invest in the unlimited accounts version. They offer this for a one-time fee of $126, or if you want to pay yearly, it’s $88. Either way, their deals are reasonable.


Pinterest is a great way for your small business to display your work and showcase your expertise in your industry. Examples include Pins with images and videos of your work, infographics, data visualizations, and blog posts. Due to the fact you might not be a recognized brand yet, doing this is important. That’s because as your business grows and you become more well-known, you’ll be more likely to be recognized as an industry leader and a business with helpful and applicable content for audience members.
Users will never even see your image if you don’t have the right keywords and copy to tell them (and the Pinterest algorithm) what you have in store. Pin descriptions, board descriptions, profile descriptions, and board titles should all creatively include keywords for that very reason—but avoid writing copy that looks and feels like low-effort keyword stuffing.
Like Pinterest discusses in their Tips for Creating Customer Growth on Pinterest article, “too often, online marketing tactics focus on customers who already know what they want to buy—instead of expanding their reach to also include people earlier in their shopping journey,” which is an extremely important perspective to keep in mind when creating content for your Pinterest marketing strategy. To grow your reach on Pinterest, you need to focus on the early steps in a user’s shopping journey and that starts by telling a story and creating a need for the user to make them want to purchase your product to fulfill that need.
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