To promote your Pinterest account and content, you should share your Pins, images, and videos in other areas to improve your chances of being seen and followed. For example, you can claim your business’ Pinterest account on Instagram, Etsy, and YouTube so your followers can easily learn about the other platforms you’re on and how they can view more of your content. Additionally, claiming your account will provide access to analytics and data on all of these Pins so you can see the other networks your audience is most interested in.
@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right.
Facebook, Google, Instagram – all major sources of traffic are constantly evolving. Pinterest, however, changes more rapidly than all these three put together. At least, it often feels that way. Every 2 months or so, I see them testing out new features (as I have quite the big business account, I probably see some features that never get rolled out to average users).
Their pricing is, again, affordable and reasonable. What’s different about FollowingLike is that you only have to pay a one-off fee. Unlike other automated bots that are going to set you back every month, FollowingLike charges you once. You can buy the one account version for $51 right now. If you’re looking for them to manage more than one account for you, this will set you back $73. It’s worth your money if you invest in the unlimited accounts version. They offer this for a one-time fee of $126, or if you want to pay yearly, it’s $88. Either way, their deals are reasonable.
Once you sign up for a Pinterest account, you’re able to begin sharing content and, therefore, social media marketing on the platform. You have the option to upload your business’ content from your computer or mobile device, Pin content you find on the platform, or add content you find on the web using the Pinterest browser button. You can also follow the boards of your friends and competitors, “Like”, and comment on others’ Pins, re-Pin (or repost) content, and share links to your website and blog in your Pins.

Pin too little and people will lose interest in you; pin too much and you risk being unfollowed. Pinterest suggests 10-12 Pins per day, in order to appear more often in your follower’s feed and search results. Of course, this also depends upon the time of day you are pinning. Peak time is between 8-11pm on weekends. These are great numbers and times to start with and to later tweak according to the analytical insights on the Pinterest marketing tools you’ve used (discussed later).
Two of my consumer brand clients – Imperial Sugar and Dixie Crystals have seen a huge influx of traffic from Pinterest. In fact, in less than 30 days, Pinterest leapfrogged over Facebook in terms of referral traffic to our online recipe database. It’s the perfect medium for sharing recipes and tracking what types of recipes our community wants to see more of. You can find the boards at http://www.pinterest.com/imperialsugar and http://www.pinterest.com/dixiecrystals to see what we’ve done.
I’m so new to all of this. I’m a wedding music looking to engage with brides and grooms. On my website I’ve included a few blog posts so far, but absolutely need to make the content better and with more images. I’m just at a loss sometimes for inspiration on what to write about. On my business Pinterest account, I’ve included boards to help inspire brides and grooms. Pretty much the only ones that redirect back to my website/blog are on my Texas Harmony board. What in the world should I do to change the number of conversions from people clicking to actually visiting my blog for wedding ideas? And do you have articles on brainstorming what to blog about??? I know there are tons of pins out there but I’m pinned out for the night. Lol
Incorporate color contrast. Color contrast is another good practice to incorporate, because it makes your images more visibly appealing and easy to read. Unsurprisingly, it helps users with low visibility be able to make out the images more clearly in many cases. Pinterest officially recommends a contrast ratio of 3.00:1, and released this image to show the importance:

Alisa Meredith is the Content Marketing Manager at Tailwind – a Pinterest and Instagram scheduler and analytics platform. She is a sought-after speaker and teacher on Pinterest and Promoted Pins in particular, having spoken at Social Media Marketing World, Agents of Change and appearing on The Art of Paid Traffic and Social Pros podcasts. Alisa has invested heavily in becoming an expert in her craft – realizing (and loving) the fact that the learning never ends!  She lives in coastal North Carolina with her pampered pets Spike (who only eats eggs and Spam), Pepe the couchpotato Cavapoo, and more cats than she’d like to admit to.


I pin a minimum of 5-10 pins per day. Most of those pins are my own content and are being pinned to my own boards, along with a few group boards. How often you pin per day depends on how much content you are creating. There is no magic number. You have to figure out what works for you. It’s not detrimental to pin 10 times one day and 15 the next day.
If you continue to scroll down your setting page, you will see a spot that says “Claim,” you want to enter your website into the box and hit the “Claim” button. This will allow you to track any pins that are pinned from your website and your profile picture — in this case, your logo — will show up next to any pins that come from your website as well as create ads and buyable pins.
This Promoted Pin from Kohls, however, has the type of content that pinners love. It’s offering value, using the context of “how to pick the perfect pillows” in order to promote some of their pillows’ great qualities and show off a few styles. Their description capitalizes on this, saying, “Throw pillows are a fun way to incorporate a little style,” and the image shows users how. This is a great way to maximize your description. 
Those comments don’t really address what I was bringing up. “You” (everyone) is assigning a value to all these “gorgeous images” that 99% of the time, are not being offered up for free use or license by/to Pinterest and users. Yes, “you”‘re using these valuable works to drive traffic and build a network – all commercial uses without permission from the artist.

Good points, Beth. I also think it’s important, as I pointed out in my blog post, that if a company is using Pinterest they actually lead it back to content, whether it’s a product or service on their website or content on their blog. It’s a perfect example for companies to implement a content marketing strategy and promote their brand through providing useful information (coupled with eye-catching images) and becoming a trusted resource. It’s so much less “in your face” and lessens the risk of potential customers getting annoyed with you spamming Pinterest with promos or pointless contests.
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