Optimize your website content for Pinterest sharing (Part Two): Consider watermarking your images, or adding text to them. If you’re using your own images on Pinterest, one of the best ways to help your image stand out is by adding a clear description to the image itself, or adding a watermark with your business name. Make sure it’s clear, but that it doesn’t block out the main subject of the photo.
Pinterest is one of the more versatile, affordable, and impactful marketing tools for businesses that are looking to convert more leads, drive traffic to their websites, and increase brand awareness to use. Plus, Pinterest users have the highest purchase intent of any other social media users. Let’s discuss some more ways small businesses, like yours, can benefit from creating a presence on Pinterest.

Great article and have seen others like it but not as comprehensive with fantastic ideas. However… as this topic has come up lately, the Pinterest Terms of Use state: “If you decide to use the Application, subject to your compliance with the terms and conditions of these Terms, Cold Brew Labs grants you a limited non-exclusive, non-transferable, revocable license, without the right to sublicense, for you to install, access and use such Application on a mobile device that you own or control, solely for your personal and non-commercial purposes.”
My wife got me into Pinterest which I initially just wrote off as “another” social media site. Great article Beth. I will have to follow you and see how to use all these techniques first-hand. It seems like the web in general is evolving into a more picture oriented communication medium. Pinterest is the future, here now. I can see Google having a picture based search only option in the not too distant future.
The problem is, that people don’t get to pass it up. If they have chosen to use Flickr to display their work, for example, someone can go “pin” their image without the artist ever knowing, until they find it pinned all over the place and hosted on blogs. When licensing work, they may even choose to pass up a group they disagree with, say, AARP for example, yet that group can create a board to promote their work and go out and grab any image they like from the net. What then? What makes “pinning” inherently different than taking any image from anywhere and putting it on your website?
Pincodes are a unique code that work similarly to QR Codes and they help people find your brand and products on Pinterest. Pincodes can be placed on any of your physical brand assets like brochures, business cards, packaging and displays and whenever people scan them with their Pinterest app, it’ll direct them to your content destination on Pinterest.
Include CTAs in your visual. The visual you use in the promoted pin should focus on catching the user's attention in a feed full of other appealing pins. Including direct CTAs in your visual will not just take away the visual appeal from your pin, but also get your ad disapproved. Make use of "soft" CTAs (like "Here's how to write a compelling blog post") when promoting a checklist you'll be redirecting them to.
One trick is to use various quotes from your most recent blog post or testimonials about your recent product and link to the website page many different times. You can also Pin the same Pin to different boards. For example, if you write a blog post about buying the best homeowners insurance, that can go on a board that only holds your blog posts, it can also go on a board that talks about financial planning and a board that talks about homeownership.
The problem is, that people don’t get to pass it up. If they have chosen to use Flickr to display their work, for example, someone can go “pin” their image without the artist ever knowing, until they find it pinned all over the place and hosted on blogs. When licensing work, they may even choose to pass up a group they disagree with, say, AARP for example, yet that group can create a board to promote their work and go out and grab any image they like from the net. What then? What makes “pinning” inherently different than taking any image from anywhere and putting it on your website?
Those comments don’t really address what I was bringing up. “You” (everyone) is assigning a value to all these “gorgeous images” that 99% of the time, are not being offered up for free use or license by/to Pinterest and users. Yes, “you”‘re using these valuable works to drive traffic and build a network – all commercial uses without permission from the artist.

You mention linking our Pinterest to our Facebook pages, but if we are a business and have a Facebook page, how can we link our Pinterest since pages don’t really have their own log-in?? If I try to link to Facebook, it picks up my personal Facebook account (and I’m admin of my page.) Do you know if an interface with Facebook pages for Pinterest is coming? Or I’m just going to post links on Facebook to my Pinterest boards is my plan. Thanks for the article-lots of great info!

Before choosing keywords, do your research. Check keywords using Google’s AdWords Keyword Planner, KeywordSpy or whatever tool you’re comfortable using. Also, do some research on Pinterest. Enter the keywords you’re considering using and see what comes up. People use Pinterest search differently than they use Google and other search engines, so it’s helpful to see the phrases the Pinterest community uses.
Monetization: Currently, Pinterest is not a very successful business. Unlike Facebook, they are not reaping billions each year. At one point they need to cash in and this will probably lead to less traffic to your website. Why is this important? I am not entirely sure you should lay all your eggs in the Pinterest basket anymore. Try to diversify (SEO or be an early discover for a new medium). It’s just a hunch, but traffic potential from Pinterest might just be about to see its peak.
Thanks for stopping by and commenting! Yes! Join more group boards! But, I thought you were already on a lot? Oh, maybe that’s FB 🙂 As for the interval function, I had no idea that was an option in Tailwind. I honestly don’t stay in the dashboard of Tailwind so I’m learning as I go. How is that different from scheduling them based on your schedule? Is this so you don’t “spam” a group board? So far I haven’t had that happened even when I was scheduling 200 pins a day. I’ll go over to Lady Boss League and find that post! Thanks
Thanks so much for this helpful piece Beth. I am a moderator at a fun online community for visual artists and discovered Pinterest because many of our new members were listing it as the place they learned about The Art Colony. I was puzzled about how this could happen so I joined Pinterest. A couple of weeks later I am seeing how it is a fresh spot to get inspirations and learn about cool stuff, save links, and easily return to the things that caught your eye!
You’re also able to show your audience and followers how much their support and business means to you through giveaways, videos of your behind the scenes work, latest company news, product information, promotions, and discount codes. Creating and maintaining these business-to-customer routines early on humanizes your brand, sets the tone for what your company will be known for, and shows customers how you intend to grow with them in mind.

I am teaching a social media workshop next weekend at the University of Washington. I’m using my blog in lieu of textbooks because with social media changing so fast it’s impossible to find a book that’s up to date! Would you mind if I repost this on my blog with full disclosre that it originates here (and I would of course add links back to you)? I think the students would get a lot out of this piece! Thanks for your consideration!
This has a very important implication: The more engaged and loyal your followers are, the faster your pin will take off. Pinterest has said the number of followers did not matter as much as the percental engagement. This, however, also means that users who built their accounts organically (as opposed to follow/unfollow techniques), will have a bigger benefit.

Opt for a content-based approach. I remember seeing a recipe for a breakfast parfait and saving it, only to realize later on that the recipe was from Fage, a Greek yogurt brand, and it featured a specific flavor of yogurt none of their competitors had. It was a smart move, because content like recipes and DIY tutorials perform great on Pinterest. If you can feature your products in a similar way, this is a good strategy to try, especially for brand awareness campaigns.
8. Not installing the “Pin It” button on your browser. While this won’t actually make you look dumb on Pinterest, it’s simply something you’ve got to do! The “pin it” button makes it super easy to curate content from any website. With a quick click, you can pin an image that contains a description and a website link. Simply highlight the text you want as the description before you click “Pin it.”
The more boards you have, the more pins your can schedule. It also depends on the group board you belong to. If there are only 10 contributors, your pins may flood their feed. If that’s the case you just have to pop in to your boards and not put those types of boards in your schedule. I belong to over a 100 group boards, but not all of them are in my Tailwind schedule. Many of them only have 5 or 10 contributors, so I don’t pin to them or have stopped pinning to them until they get more contributors.
Adding a few words of text to your images can help give an immediate idea of what the linked content is all about. For example, food-related Pins that include a short text call-out get 23 percent more clickthroughs and 31 percent more saves. But don’t go overboard, since Pinterest specifically recommends avoiding images that are too busy. This Pin from Kraft Foods uses just the right amount of text:
Me again- going through the list now and writing some things down to keep in mind for later and making changes as I go along- care to elaborate a bit more on #44 – “Do you have a number of different ideal client personas? Create a separate board to represent each client persona, then use those boards during your sales cycle and embed them into your website pages so people are clear about the kinds of clients you’re trying to attract.”
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