@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right.
So, how can your business use Pinterest as a marketing tactic to help improve your brand awareness and conversions? In this guide, we’ll cover the answer to that question as well as which Pinterest marketing strategies you should implement, how small businesses can benefit from the platform, and which tools you can use to ensure your Pinterest marketing strategy works for your business.

Boards are used to organize and categorize Pins (don’t worry, we’ll get to these next). From Boards about the new bathroom and next vacation location to wedding planning and ultimate wish-lists (just say the word and we’ll link you to ours). Boards enable users to gather their Pins into a logical and beautiful fashion. Plus, Boards can be divided up into sections, to make them even more organized.
Direct to a lead generation landing page. Pinterest users are only able to see a glimpse of what you’re offering in a pin, and they typically click to get more information without sharing their contact information. While the platform itself won’t disapprove of your pin, you should still avoid linking to a lead generation landing page. Instead, link to a web page that shares more information about your value proposition and gives the user the "choice" to convert.
Like Pinterest discusses in their Tips for Creating Customer Growth on Pinterest article, “too often, online marketing tactics focus on customers who already know what they want to buy—instead of expanding their reach to also include people earlier in their shopping journey,” which is an extremely important perspective to keep in mind when creating content for your Pinterest marketing strategy. To grow your reach on Pinterest, you need to focus on the early steps in a user’s shopping journey and that starts by telling a story and creating a need for the user to make them want to purchase your product to fulfill that need.
I started using interval because I was hugely paranoid about spamming group boards (it took me ages to even get up the courage to post anything to the first one, lol) and mainly because I thought it would be good to drip the content out over time rather than in one big rush. Initially I thought that I could just keep each pin cycling through my group board list indefinitely, but that doesn’t take into account that as I make more pins, they start to stack and I might overwhelm the boards.
Health & fitness are one of the most popular content categories on Pinterest. New York studio Kettlebell Kickboxing has built a strong profile on Pinterest because they do a fantastic job describing why potential customers should come in and join them in their profile. They explain their program and why it benefits users in just a few words. Their boards also reinforce this. For example, their Kettlebell Boxing board features articles and resources about why the program works so well.
Thanks for all the tips here. I’ve been growing on pinterest, too, but still need to accelerate things. I’ve been finding it challenging to get into more of the top decor boards (I do flooring) as many are closed to new pinners). I’ve also been collaborating with a friend of mine who has a larger following and more group boards, and we are helping each other.

18. Not telling anyone your business is on Pinterest. Use the networks you already have (Facebook, Twitter, word-of-mouth, etc.) to spread the word. You can use Constant Contact’s email templates to let subscribers know you’re on Pinterest. Adding a Pinterest logo to your website or blog will also help grow your following and act as a reminder to people who visit your website to pin your content.
SocialPilot Lite is free to schedule up to 30 pins and post 10 times per day. Their individual plan is $10 a month and comes with considerably more. You can schedule up to 1000 posts in your queue and post 50 times per day. The content discovery tools are limited while the analytics they provide are non-existent in this basic package. Tailwind and even Buffer have a wider variety of Pinterest automation tools available for this pricing level.
Once you hit the Claim button, you are given instructions on how to verify and claim your website. These instructions include placing a tag or code on your website for verification. You can have someone on your team place a specific code on your website or, if you need someone else to handle this rather tech-savvy step, you can hire someone from Fiverr to do it for you.

Pin with your target market in mind. Not just the things that you personally write about, but also lateral content they’re also interested in. This applies not just to what you pin, but how you craft your pin descriptions, board descriptions, and profile. Think of your target market every time you sit down to pin, and you’ll have much greater results than if you only pin according to your own tastes. 


I pin a minimum of 5-10 pins per day. Most of those pins are my own content and are being pinned to my own boards, along with a few group boards. How often you pin per day depends on how much content you are creating. There is no magic number. You have to figure out what works for you. It’s not detrimental to pin 10 times one day and 15 the next day.
Promoted Pins (aka Pinterest ads) are a great way to get your Pins seen by more people, creating new exposure for your brand. But Promoted Pins can provide exposure well beyond what you pay for. Internal Pinterest data shows that advertisers get an average of 20 percent more organic clicks in the month following the launch of a Pinterest ad campaign.
Hi Elna, this an easy awesome article, I very new to pinterest; I am a small youtuber ( braid, home remedies, makeup reviews) I joined pinterst today because I want to grow my channel. I am lost here lol, everything is new and a bit confusing, I have just posted three videos ( how to do a french braid, how to cornrow and how to do african stretching hairstyle) can you please check my pinterest page and please give me feedback I really need it. Yes I hate follow me I follow you back, that method is big on youtube, I did that when I first started and it’s not good at all.
WHY: Not only does this help you get found and gives Pinterest a better idea of what you’re all about so they can recommend your account and your boards to other people, but strangers who happen to come across your account don’t have to spend hours determining what you pin about and if they should follow you. So you improve your chances of being found by the right people.
If your target audience is active on Pinterest, it is definitely worth adding it to your marketing mix. For categories such as food, travel, home decoration, fashion and beauty, Pinterest is an obvious choice. However, it can be made to work for practically any type of business, whether you sell products or services. Many service-based businesses do very well on Pinterest.
Pinterest recommends to add multiple dots on the pin and it will perform better. Tag 3 products or more for a Shop The Look pin because then  3 pictures of the products will show at the bottom.  Items under $50 are the sweet spot for Shop The Look as not everyone can afford more expensive items. Or if you have an item that is very expensive, be sure to include comparable items that are less expensive.  
Even though Pinterest is a visual search engine, descriptions are what help users find what they’re looking for when they search for specific content on Pinterest using keywords. When creating descriptions for your pins, besides using keywords that users are searching for (which you can discover by using a tool like KWFinder) make sure that every pin’s description is evergreen so it has the greatest amount of lasting potential.
Hi Elna, this was great info. I’m just starting out using Pinterest for a new blog. I’ve taken a few Pinterest courses that cover the Pinterest side of things, but one thing that I’m a bit confused about is the best placement of the Pinterest image inside my blog post. Some blogs have a featured image at the top with a Pinterest image at the bottom, some just have a huge Pinterest image at the top…so I’m uncertain what is the best thing to do!
There is a ton of advice out there for what makes a good pinnable image but what you are wanting is for people to click-through that image and not just pin it. Experiencing why you click-through to an article is better than just knowing by reading the research. If you would click the image than your audience probably will too! So when I do a search on Pinterest, and I actually click-through to the website to read the article, I will then pin the image to my “Click Through Pins” board. I then can go back and analyze what made me click-through the pins to the site and can apply the personalized research to my brand.
Enter Pingroupie. This free tool’s entire purpose is to list group boards that are currently live. You could reach out to these board owners and see if they’d be open to doing a group board with you, or if they’re in need of contributors like you. If you’re able to contribute relevant, non-spammy content of your own, there could be a lot to gain for your brand.
Hashtags on Pinterest are used to help users identify Pins and boards about a specific topic they’re searching. When users click on a hashtag you include on a Pins, they’re brought to a page in which they can view all content ever posted on the platform tagged with that specific hashtag. You should add hashtags to your Pins, boards, and promoted content (if you have any) to ensure the greatest amount of visibility.
Don’t make this mistake because pinning everything and anything clutter your pin boards. Disjointed pins can make your boards look unorganized and lack any kind of theme. Pinterest surfers like content to be organized so that they can easily find what they are looking for. Don’t be afraid to pin interesting content your audience would enjoy, but try to keep them connected to your business.
Thank you for this information. I found this while at work so I will begin to implement these things once I get home. Also, I am just getting started blogging on my Senior website/blog to bring in more traffic…do you have any suggestions to gaining my target clients to read my blog? My website is http://www.missaraebia.com and I welcome any suggestions. I am also a mom blogger. I have 6 children, (1) just got married last week. Thank you so much and I am super excited to have bumped into your blog!

I’ve joined Pinterest and hooked it up to my business site. So far I haven’t really noticed any great increase in my site’s traffic due to Pinterest. But I agree…Pinterest is becoming huge and I think finally surpassed LinkedIn as one of the top three. Might as well play along! 🙂 Good tips though…I certainly started looking through my pins to see if and where I could I apply some of your advice.

Really fab tips and just what I was looking for, as I stumble around on Pinterest. I tweeted it through the sharing buttons and I noticed that your Twitter name wasn't automatically provided (I like including the Twitter name when I share someone's posts as it thanks them). Yet I'm sure that when I've shared your posts in the pasts, the click-through link has included your Twitter name....just thought I'd mention it.

The problem is, that people don’t get to pass it up. If they have chosen to use Flickr to display their work, for example, someone can go “pin” their image without the artist ever knowing, until they find it pinned all over the place and hosted on blogs. When licensing work, they may even choose to pass up a group they disagree with, say, AARP for example, yet that group can create a board to promote their work and go out and grab any image they like from the net. What then? What makes “pinning” inherently different than taking any image from anywhere and putting it on your website? 

One of the things I hear over and over again from Pinterest users–individuals and businesses–is that we don’t want Pinterest turning into another sales pitch ghetto as users plug their MLM products or Etsy sites or corporate product lines. The primary reason that Pinterest is so successful is its organic and cooperative nature. There are, as you listed, many ways (at least 54 it would seem) to promote a business or brand without resorting to carnival shilling and Web 1.0 scorched earth tactics.
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