Thanks so much for this helpful piece Beth. I am a moderator at a fun online community for visual artists and discovered Pinterest because many of our new members were listing it as the place they learned about The Art Colony. I was puzzled about how this could happen so I joined Pinterest. A couple of weeks later I am seeing how it is a fresh spot to get inspirations and learn about cool stuff, save links, and easily return to the things that caught your eye!
Yeah, Anshul, I gotta admit – I didn’t see the point of Pinterest for a long time. I thought it was another pared-down Facebook knock-off. But then I started using it and can really see all the different ways it can be used for marketing. Plus, it’s now driving over HALF the traffic to my site, and I’m just getting started! I saw an immediate boost to traffic and mailing list signups. It’s been a huge boon for me.
The number one Pinterest tip I can give you is to be true to your brand in your Pinnable images. Create a certain recognizable style. Always use the same font, logo or watermark, and other elements when you add an image to a blog post. Over time people will start to recognize you for your pictures on Pinterest. Those pictures give them an incentive to take a look on your blog to see if you’ve updated lately. That means more traffic for you, all by simply being true to your brand. 
Pinterest recommends to add multiple dots on the pin and it will perform better. Tag 3 products or more for a Shop The Look pin because then  3 pictures of the products will show at the bottom.  Items under $50 are the sweet spot for Shop The Look as not everyone can afford more expensive items. Or if you have an item that is very expensive, be sure to include comparable items that are less expensive.  
Interest targeting and keyword targeting, however, hold more value than they’re typically given on other platforms. Choosing the right keywords is essential to ensuring your content pops up in the right searches organically, and the same is true for ad targeting. Choosing the right interests will help Pinterest place your ads with users who are most likely to be interested in seeing them when browsing.
Remember the user experience and don’t pin the same pins back to back on the same board. New content can take a while to take off on Pinterest. When you create new content, pin it to all relevant boards at least one time per day (use a 24-hour interval between if you’re using Tailwind). Then in a couple of weeks, look in Tailwind and see how the pins performed.
I see from your website that your business is eDoctor but not really sure what services you offer. I would suggest that you carve out a tiny little sliver of your business and focus a Pinterest board just on that niche. The more specific those pin boards appear to be, the easier it will be for folks to find you. And, of course, throwing up a pin board is like hanging out your shingle. You will still need to let people know that you’re up on Pinterest or you’ll miss a lot of opportunities for your fans to actually find your board(s).
Once you’ve marketed yourself on Pinterest, a great way to bring it back home would be to embed your Pinterest feed on your website (http://www.postano.com/solutions/for-websites/). This way, you’re still exposing the content you’re posting on Pinterest to more eyes for those that visit your site that aren’t yet on Pinterest. Although it seems like everyone is on Pinterest, you’d be surprised how many people still aren’t.

If you use the Pinterest tag or send us mobile app activity, you must tell your website and app visitors that their information will be shared with third parties for online behavioral advertising, and that they can opt out of online behavioral advertising through their Pinterest personalization settings, the AdChoices website optout.aboutads.info (if you use the Pinterest tag), or their mobile ad identifier settings (if you share app activity data with us).
 I’ve seen articles advising on the best times to Pin as well, but I generally take these with a pinch of salt as the content I pin spreads across International time zones. Also, you’ll find that a good pin will have a MUCH longer shelf-life than something on Twitter or Facebook. People are still pinning my old stuff months later – that simply doesn’t happen on most other social networks!
So, please whatever you do, don’t just post product photos. Do you remember that study done by The University of Minnesota? Well, diversity of pin was the 8th most important factor when users were deciding whether to follow an account. So, throw in some other boards that give your followers added value in order to avoid coming off as overly salesy.
Similar to other advertising channels, Pinterest has its own Tag, which is a piece of code that is applied to your website. With the Tag, you will be able to better measure the effectiveness of your campaigns, understand customer paths from engagements to conversions, define audiences for remarketing and track a number of events such as page visits, category views, searches, cart additions, checkouts, video views, signups and leads.
For example, instead of pinning a product photo of your brand’s lawn mower that includes a title describing the type of lawn mower that it is, a description detailing the lawn mower’s capabilities and including a link back to your lawn mower’s product page, it’s a more effective Pinterest marketing strategy to pin an image of your lawn mower actually mowing a lawn with a title that says something to the effect of “How to Get Perfectly Cut Golf Course Grass at Home” including a description that discusses what perfectly cut, golf course-like grass is and how this lawn mower can help you achieve it, and then link to your lawn mower’s product page.
Hi Elise – Facebook actually has an app that will let you pull your pins into your Facebook page. It’s acting really wonky for me, though, so I’ll bet they’re still working out the kinks. Here’s the link – http://apps.facebook.com/pinterestapp/ Right now that App page is just re-routing to the Pinterest business page, so there seems to be some sort of issue, but I’ve seen business Pages use it, and it’s cool! Best of luck!
Alisa Meredith is the Content Marketing Manager at Tailwind – a Pinterest and Instagram scheduler and analytics platform. She is a sought-after speaker and teacher on Pinterest and Promoted Pins in particular, having spoken at Social Media Marketing World, Agents of Change and appearing on The Art of Paid Traffic and Social Pros podcasts. Alisa has invested heavily in becoming an expert in her craft – realizing (and loving) the fact that the learning never ends!  She lives in coastal North Carolina with her pampered pets Spike (who only eats eggs and Spam), Pepe the couchpotato Cavapoo, and more cats than she’d like to admit to.
This makes me sad. Months ago when I first signed on to Pinterest, it was a wonderland full of awesome ideas, cool crafts, and amazing recipes shared. I logged on to Pinterest daily, sometimes a couple times a day. Now every time I sign on, it’s nothing but a giant ad board. Having to weed through everyone’s ads and marketing of themselves just to find those same cool crafts and recipes isn’t worth the effort anymore, and now I rarely use Pinterest. Think about that. The more companies use Pinterest to pimp themselves out, the faster it’s going to fade, because the original users are becoming more like me.
Opt for a content-based approach. I remember seeing a recipe for a breakfast parfait and saving it, only to realize later on that the recipe was from Fage, a Greek yogurt brand, and it featured a specific flavor of yogurt none of their competitors had. It was a smart move, because content like recipes and DIY tutorials perform great on Pinterest. If you can feature your products in a similar way, this is a good strategy to try, especially for brand awareness campaigns.
Users will never even see your image if you don’t have the right keywords and copy to tell them (and the Pinterest algorithm) what you have in store. Pin descriptions, board descriptions, profile descriptions, and board titles should all creatively include keywords for that very reason—but avoid writing copy that looks and feels like low-effort keyword stuffing.
6. Mixing your personal interest boards with business-related boards. There are actually a few instances where I’ve seen this done successfully, but overall this tactic doesn’t work. Are your customers actually interested in the recipes you’re considering trying or the table settings you want at your fantasy wedding? Probably not. Keep your business account for your business and your personal account for your personal interests.
If you need a powerful Pinterest tool that truly digs deep and allows you to get the most out of your Pinterest account, Tailwind is probably a tool you’ll want to take a serious look at. Tailwind offers a free trial for your first 100 pins. This will help you get a feel for how things work. After your trial runs out, you can switch to the basic subscription of $9.99 a month.
Pinterest is one of the biggest search engines on the internet, so treat it as such with regards to keyword research (and use). Although a full primer on Pinterest SEO is outside of the scope of this article (though let us know if you’re interested in a ffollow-uparticle on the topic in the comments!), the principals are largely the same as SEO for Google.
Then, I’m about to help you. Instead of rehearsing all the old news (like updating your profile pic and getting a business account. duh!) I tried to focus on very actionable items. Unique techniques I use every day that helped me drive a constant 5,000 visitors to my site. each. day. The information is based on official interviews and quite a couple of e-mail conversations with Pinterest (so no urban myths, sorry!), but also empirical evidence from stuff that worked out for me.
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