Pinterest can definitely be a useful tool for growing your business or getting exposure for new products. The capabilities of this kind of curatorial site allow you to showcase the taste of your brand in a whole new way, and definitely speak to a specific and powerful demographic. When done right, Pinterest is a great way to enhance your online presence, so have at with the pins!
Yeah, I’m seeing the same things, Linda – that was the inspiration for the document. I’ve also been working with my clients on getting started with Pinterest marketing, and the main issue that I see is a lack of focus or strategy. I think because Pinterest is so much fun, people just sort of leap in, pin a couple of images, and hope for the best. But strategy is just as important with Pinterest as it is with other social media tools like Facebook or Twitter.
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
I’m not an alarmist. I like safe, simple rules and guidelines that stay consistent over time. I don’t think Pinterest is any different. Over time, Pinterest marketing has evolved (hey, hashtags) but the foundation of keywords and vertical images has not. Human interaction with Pinterest has changed. In this post, I’ll be sharing the main principles to a solid Pinterest marketing strategy.
Good points, Beth. I also think it’s important, as I pointed out in my blog post, that if a company is using Pinterest they actually lead it back to content, whether it’s a product or service on their website or content on their blog. It’s a perfect example for companies to implement a content marketing strategy and promote their brand through providing useful information (coupled with eye-catching images) and becoming a trusted resource. It’s so much less “in your face” and lessens the risk of potential customers getting annoyed with you spamming Pinterest with promos or pointless contests.
Users will never even see your image if you don’t have the right keywords and copy to tell them (and the Pinterest algorithm) what you have in store. Pin descriptions, board descriptions, profile descriptions, and board titles should all creatively include keywords for that very reason—but avoid writing copy that looks and feels like low-effort keyword stuffing.

Your anchor board is a board where you only pin your own content and they all lead people to your blog posts, website or landing pages. (I suggest creating this even if you haven’t created your own pins to go in it yet. We will work on that in the next step.) You should name it something obvious such as “Best of BLOG NAME” so people know that you pin your own content in there.
I used to put in hours of hard work each day to market my sites and products on Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, etc.. Now I just put my social media accounts on autopilot and I am getting even more followers on Pinterest since I started to use this software. If you are looking for an easy and hands-free way to drive massive traffic to your websites and offers through social media sites, you have found the great solution. I highly recommend it to all internet marketers.
Interest targeting and keyword targeting, however, hold more value than they’re typically given on other platforms. Choosing the right keywords is essential to ensuring your content pops up in the right searches organically, and the same is true for ad targeting. Choosing the right interests will help Pinterest place your ads with users who are most likely to be interested in seeing them when browsing.
Business-to-consumer (B2C) companies in general have a much easier time on Pinterest than business-to-business (B2B) companies, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible for the latter to get traction on the platform. Ultimately, whether or not Pinterest is a good fit for your business will depend heavily on whether or not your target audience overlaps with their existing user base.

One of the many benefits of having a business account is that you can create private boards that are not publicly visible to Pinterest users, and with these, you can compose Pins that you later deploy as part of a campaign. (If you are unable to locate a Pin that you want to promote, be sure to check if it’s in a secret board, as Pins can only be promoted from public or protected boards.)
The “People you reach” tab has some extremely valuable information. We always think within our niche, but our followers don’t. They might be interested in travel, DYI home decor, and recipes. It can be a very smart idea to toss in a couple of boards to cover these topics as well. Your end goal should always be engagement, and what better way to engage than with the topics your audience likes?
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