I’ve done some thinking this past week, and I really don’t have much of a Pinterest strategy 🙂  But I do think what has worked for me, and would be my best tip, is that almost all my pins are things I truly like and that fit in my niche of homemade and DIY projects.  People who choose to follow me on Pinterest know that they will find pins and more ideas on the same subjects that brought them to my blog.  And if they found me on Pinterest first and have then come over to my blog, they will again find lots of info on the same subject as the type of pins they found interesting. I think this gives some continuity to my brand and continues to give me an authentic voice on my subject.  

Really fab tips and just what I was looking for, as I stumble around on Pinterest. I tweeted it through the sharing buttons and I noticed that your Twitter name wasn't automatically provided (I like including the Twitter name when I share someone's posts as it thanks them). Yet I'm sure that when I've shared your posts in the pasts, the click-through link has included your Twitter name....just thought I'd mention it.
My latest Pinterest tip is to create a “Pins I’ve Clicked Through Board.” I fully believe that you are your best researcher for your audience. After all, if you are interested enough to write and research about it you should be your best audience. For many of us, Pinterest is a huge traffic driver for our blogs and websites. Honestly, when I want to know something I will generally search it on Pinterest before I go to Google.
22. Forgetting traditional social media best practices. Commenting isn’t the most popular form of engagement on Pinterest, but it is still important to monitor what your fans are saying and doing. Look for opportunities to respond and engage with potential customers too. Also, similar to other social networks, always remember to stick to a consistent content frequency that works for you.

Thanks so much for this helpful piece Beth. I am a moderator at a fun online community for visual artists and discovered Pinterest because many of our new members were listing it as the place they learned about The Art Colony. I was puzzled about how this could happen so I joined Pinterest. A couple of weeks later I am seeing how it is a fresh spot to get inspirations and learn about cool stuff, save links, and easily return to the things that caught your eye!
Great suggestions, Patricia – and this conversation has made me pay much closer attention to what I’m re-pinning now. I always check to see that the pin links back to a valid website. Recently I’ve seen quite a few images that just link back to the “Google Images” search page, and I definitely don’t re-pin those because it seems like that image was likely just lifted from Google.
Hello! My name is Ana and I am a UK blogging growth strategist & coach, social media geek and the biggest supporter of women who are starting a blog or building their digital empires. I am obsessed with all things blog traffic and affiliate marketing and The She Approach is simply the platform where I openly share my strategies & failures, in the hope of helping new bloggers get ahead faster. Read more →
@Patricia – Watermarks are definitely key but I know many artists who do not like them. If placed on an edge/corner of an image, they do not help against theft – anyone can crop the edge off. If placed over the center, your prospective customer can’t *see* the image clearly so I only know of one artist out of hundreds who has opted for that. I can’t see any watermarks on the link you provided- I see a page of thumbnails and when enlarged don’t see any watermarks. The second method helps protect against blatant theft, so maybe the answer is the more subtle first method. I am not sure how offering a folder of “Pinterest friendly” images would work. Anyone surfing the web can find any image you’ve posted on a blog or website and pin it and not even know a “friendly for Pins” folder exists…
Pinterest makes it very clear that vertical aspect ratio is imperative when creating content for Pinterest audiences. Pins on Pinterest are recommended to be 2:3 — 600px wide x 900px high. These are the ideal dimensions so users can see the image in the best possible way. Vertical images also prove to be better for engagement because they take up more space in Pinterest’s kanban format, which takes up more real estate on users’ devices which is ideal for brands. Pinterest discusses the importance of the vertical aspect ratio and proper dimensions in their Creative Approach to Pinterest article.

The Mojo Spa in Illinois has a very unique, distinctive brand. They create good-for-you cosmetics in an affordable price range, and the creator of the company calls herself the “Willy Wonka of beauty.” Their Pinterest does a remarkable job of capturing the whimsical and wonderfully quirky nature of their brand while promoting their products simultaneously. Just in case users aren’t familiar with their brand, they give you a summary of who they are in their profile bio:
The next part of this step is to confirm your website. In the first step, you were asked to insert your website into your profile details. While that shows up publicly on your account (and might even send blog traffic your way from people that found you and loved what you pin), Pinterest needs to know that you actually own the account for them to give you sensitive details about it.
Great post Tiffany! You write in such a common sense, matter of fact way that resonates with me for sure! I love what you said about Pinterest being a site dedicated to problems and solutions. I’ve taken many free and paid courses teaching how to use the Pinterest search bar for blog ideas, but once again, I love how you simply the process and make it make sense! Bravo to you and congratulations on your success!
Pinterest is one of the biggest search engines on the internet, so treat it as such with regards to keyword research (and use). Although a full primer on Pinterest SEO is outside of the scope of this article (though let us know if you’re interested in a ffollow-uparticle on the topic in the comments!), the principals are largely the same as SEO for Google.
Take some time to search around Pinterest to get an idea of what types of images draw your eye to them most quickly. Are there certain colors that grab your attention? Do you tend to click on images with superimposed headings? Take some time to play around with your blog post images and notice which articles are receiving the most interaction from the Pinterest community.
Keywords are the words that your ideal audience would use to look for what your business does on Pinterest. In order to be as visible as possible, you want to make sure that your pins are discovered easily, which is where careful keyword choices can be helpful. The best way to find the right keywords for your business on Pinterest is to actually perform Pinterest searches on your own to see what comes up on Pinterest.
Join Pinterest group Boards. Group boards are shared boards where many different users are invited to contribute. They are differentiated from personal boards by the use of a special group icon. Pinners who follow the group Board show up as followers of the owner only, but all Pins to the group Board, from all contributors, can show up in the home feed of every Pinner who follows it. Think of the implications of joining a group Board with a contributor who has over 100,000 followers! Use a tool like PinGroupie to determine which group Boards you should seek membership to.
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