Tiffany! I love the way you write. I think you write the way you talk so I felt like I was sitting right there next to you and listening with perked ears! Thank you so much. You took a headache inducing topic and simplified it. This was my first time on your blog and I loved every minute of it. I am a new blogger so I needed to hear this. And that Milo Tree recommendation, I am onto it. Thanks again! 

The only reason why you might want to delete underperforming pins is a totally different one. Often new followers will come and check out your boards. They will repin what they liked. So, it is in your best interest to have beautiful boards inviting visitors to repin. When some content fails to lift off, it’s a good sign visitors will skip it as well.
I’ve joined Pinterest and hooked it up to my business site. So far I haven’t really noticed any great increase in my site’s traffic due to Pinterest. But I agree…Pinterest is becoming huge and I think finally surpassed LinkedIn as one of the top three. Might as well play along! 🙂 Good tips though…I certainly started looking through my pins to see if and where I could I apply some of your advice.
While this is a comprehensive list I am pretty disappointed that there is absolutely no mention of the requirement to respect copyright and ask people first. I don’t have time to read all your posts re Pinterest. ….as you brushed off the person who asked about this. However…..I have a strong aversion to people not being informed clearly of the need to respect copyright. Especially since you have made it clear, and I know others are already using their boards commercially to make money from technically stolen prints.Pinterest has yet to have a TOC and system that ensures copyright is protected. They have tinkered but not fixed.People offering advise in my opinion have a duty to push for a respect of copyright.Links back….no not after the first repin it would seem, when Pinterest then divert the links to make them money.
This Promoted Pin from Kohls, however, has the type of content that pinners love. It’s offering value, using the context of “how to pick the perfect pillows” in order to promote some of their pillows’ great qualities and show off a few styles. Their description capitalizes on this, saying, “Throw pillows are a fun way to incorporate a little style,” and the image shows users how. This is a great way to maximize your description. 
Remember the user experience and don’t pin the same pins back to back on the same board. New content can take a while to take off on Pinterest. When you create new content, pin it to all relevant boards at least one time per day (use a 24-hour interval between if you’re using Tailwind). Then in a couple of weeks, look in Tailwind and see how the pins performed.
Like Pinterest discusses in their Tips for Creating Customer Growth on Pinterest article, “too often, online marketing tactics focus on customers who already know what they want to buy—instead of expanding their reach to also include people earlier in their shopping journey,” which is an extremely important perspective to keep in mind when creating content for your Pinterest marketing strategy. To grow your reach on Pinterest, you need to focus on the early steps in a user’s shopping journey and that starts by telling a story and creating a need for the user to make them want to purchase your product to fulfill that need.

14. Not enabling “rich pins.” By enabling rich pins on your website, real-time pricing will accompany the images that are pinned from your website. Pinners will also be able to see if the product is in stock, where they can buy it, and if your item goes on sale. Pinterest even alerts the people who have repinned your product when the price drops! Make sure you’re enabling “rich pins.”
You can also pre-populate the pin descriptions that users save to their own boards with the Pinterest Save Button. This makes it faster for users to save your images to their boards and means that all the correct, necessary and optimized information will be in the description which will make it more useful for other users who see the pin on Pinterest. If you don’t specify a description, Pinterest will pull a description from your webpage, which may not be as well optimized for Pinterest. To learn more about pre-filling your descriptions, check out this help page from Pinterest.

As a general rule, you want your boards to be 50 percent about your business and 50 percent about the interests of your audience that tie back to your business. By pinning your audience interest as well as your own content, you will entice them to engage with you more on Pinterest. When they engage with you more, Pinterest will show users your content more frequently in their feed.
Hi Elise – Facebook actually has an app that will let you pull your pins into your Facebook page. It’s acting really wonky for me, though, so I’ll bet they’re still working out the kinks. Here’s the link – http://apps.facebook.com/pinterestapp/ Right now that App page is just re-routing to the Pinterest business page, so there seems to be some sort of issue, but I’ve seen business Pages use it, and it’s cool! Best of luck!
Use Pinterest to show the trends or patterns happening within your industry and what you’re doing to make strides based on these trends. Promoting industry trends in Pinterest gives your audience different perspectives into their current strategies and what you can do to help them. For example, IBM has a board called “Tech in Healthcare” that shows how different types of data helps them to make better decisions.
In short, Pinterest is the perfect place to start your sales funnel from. With Pinterest pins, you can build awareness around your brand and products, develop consumer interest, and increase traffic, but then you can also use Pinterest to boost in-store and online sales and influence users to take actions like sign-up to, purchase and install products.

Website traffic. When the goal is driving website traffic, Pinterest charges for clicks to a website (CPC). An important note on this campaign type is that advertisers are only charged when users click to acess your website directly from the promoted pin. There is no charge for clicks from a repinned pin. Those clicks are marked as downstream or promoted traffic and are highlighted in the campaign report.
These are two vastly different approaches to the same end result – getting users to click on the pin and go through to your lawn mower’s product page – but the first example will only help you acquire users who were interested in finding a lawn mower in the first place, while the second example will help you appeal to users interested in having a beautiful lawn and a well-kept home. By appealing to user’s interests through this type of content on Pinterest, they’ll be more inclined to purchase your product because you’ve demonstrated how your product can help them achieve the results they want.
Use Pinterest’s embed option to publish pins as content in your blog posts and website pages. Note: As Pinterest is catching on, you may need to tell your users that they need to click on a Pinterest image to get to the original source. When I tried this last week, a reader wrote to me and asked, “Is there more to that Pin thing? Or is it just a pretty image?”

We want people on Pinterest to understand who's promoting content. You can't manage more than one advertiser through a single account or change the advertiser on an account. You also can't create boards for someone else (for example, if you're an agency) and promote stuff from those boards. Instead, you can help someone else promote ads from their own account.


Boards are used to organize and categorize Pins (don’t worry, we’ll get to these next). From Boards about the new bathroom and next vacation location to wedding planning and ultimate wish-lists (just say the word and we’ll link you to ours). Boards enable users to gather their Pins into a logical and beautiful fashion. Plus, Boards can be divided up into sections, to make them even more organized.
One trick is to use various quotes from your most recent blog post or testimonials about your recent product and link to the website page many different times. You can also Pin the same Pin to different boards. For example, if you write a blog post about buying the best homeowners insurance, that can go on a board that only holds your blog posts, it can also go on a board that talks about financial planning and a board that talks about homeownership.
Alisa Meredith is the Content Marketing Manager at Tailwind – a Pinterest and Instagram scheduler and analytics platform. She is a sought-after speaker and teacher on Pinterest and Promoted Pins in particular, having spoken at Social Media Marketing World, Agents of Change and appearing on The Art of Paid Traffic and Social Pros podcasts. Alisa has invested heavily in becoming an expert in her craft – realizing (and loving) the fact that the learning never ends!  She lives in coastal North Carolina with her pampered pets Spike (who only eats eggs and Spam), Pepe the couchpotato Cavapoo, and more cats than she’d like to admit to.
8. Not installing the “Pin It” button on your browser. While this won’t actually make you look dumb on Pinterest, it’s simply something you’ve got to do! The “pin it” button makes it super easy to curate content from any website. With a quick click, you can pin an image that contains a description and a website link. Simply highlight the text you want as the description before you click “Pin it.”
If you don’t want to spend the next few months in trial and error, I highly recommend investing in a good Pinterest course. Not only will that polish any mistakes that you might be making with your Pinterest account, but it will help you form a bullet proof strategy! Start by taking the Pinterest Primer free course here and do your research online.
Pin with your target market in mind. Not just the things that you personally write about, but also lateral content they’re also interested in. This applies not just to what you pin, but how you craft your pin descriptions, board descriptions, and profile. Think of your target market every time you sit down to pin, and you’ll have much greater results than if you only pin according to your own tastes. 
Shopify users – this is really simple to do. Select the Add HTML tag option, copy the full meta tag, head over to your Shopify admin > online store > themes, on the appropriate theme click actions > edit code, click on the layout section, click theme.liquid and then paste the full meta tag onto a blank line directly under the opening tag. And then save. (More detailed instructions here).

Just a heads up to Beth and everyone else at CopyBlogger. I pinned this post to my board “Craft Advice and Blogs” to save it to read again later and though it was repinned 30-ish times, 3 people were upset about it and someone claimed they reported me for pinning it. I don’t know what the hell they’re upset about??? Have I done something terribly wrong?

Two of my consumer brand clients – Imperial Sugar and Dixie Crystals have seen a huge influx of traffic from Pinterest. In fact, in less than 30 days, Pinterest leapfrogged over Facebook in terms of referral traffic to our online recipe database. It’s the perfect medium for sharing recipes and tracking what types of recipes our community wants to see more of. You can find the boards at http://www.pinterest.com/imperialsugar and http://www.pinterest.com/dixiecrystals to see what we’ve done.


This Promoted Pin from Kohls, however, has the type of content that pinners love. It’s offering value, using the context of “how to pick the perfect pillows” in order to promote some of their pillows’ great qualities and show off a few styles. Their description capitalizes on this, saying, “Throw pillows are a fun way to incorporate a little style,” and the image shows users how. This is a great way to maximize your description. 
While this is a comprehensive list I am pretty disappointed that there is absolutely no mention of the requirement to respect copyright and ask people first. I don’t have time to read all your posts re Pinterest. ….as you brushed off the person who asked about this. However…..I have a strong aversion to people not being informed clearly of the need to respect copyright. Especially since you have made it clear, and I know others are already using their boards commercially to make money from technically stolen prints.Pinterest has yet to have a TOC and system that ensures copyright is protected. They have tinkered but not fixed.People offering advise in my opinion have a duty to push for a respect of copyright.Links back….no not after the first repin it would seem, when Pinterest then divert the links to make them money.
Business-to-consumer (B2C) companies in general have a much easier time on Pinterest than business-to-business (B2B) companies, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible for the latter to get traction on the platform. Ultimately, whether or not Pinterest is a good fit for your business will depend heavily on whether or not your target audience overlaps with their existing user base.
One of the newer concepts to Pinterest is this: Is it better to repin a pin or save directly from a website? I know that’s confusing, so let me break it down. If we want to reshare our content on Pinterest (and you should—read here how I use Tailwind’s SmartLoop to do this), is it better to one, ‘repin’ or save on the Pinterest platform, or two, save from the website using the save tool (or alternatively, schedule a pin on Tailwind).
The pin/save button appears directly on your website’s product pages, making it easy for browsers to pin (and share) a link to their own Boards. 5x more easy to be precise. Immediately you’re making it simple for potential customers to engage with you and you’re gaining knowledge of who has pinned content from your website; providing you with an opportunity to engage right back. 
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