Then, I’m about to help you. Instead of rehearsing all the old news (like updating your profile pic and getting a business account. duh!) I tried to focus on very actionable items. Unique techniques I use every day that helped me drive a constant 5,000 visitors to my site. each. day. The information is based on official interviews and quite a couple of e-mail conversations with Pinterest (so no urban myths, sorry!), but also empirical evidence from stuff that worked out for me.


When I write my Pin descriptions that mimic the language that pinners use when writing notes to themselves, I can increase the engagement on that particular Pin. “LOVE this baked chicken recipe! Pinning for meal planning, healthy eating” is much more inviting than “Check out this baked chicken recipe on my blog! #healthyeating #mealplanning #chickenrecipes. 

Note: If you’re interested in learning more about what exactly Pinterest does for business, check out their Pinterest for Business article, their article on How to Start Using Pinterest For Your Business which includes sub-sections on how to increase brand awareness with Pinterest marketing, increase website traffic with Pinterest marketing, increase sales with Pinterest and how to increase conversions with Pinterest marketing. They even have a Pinterest Business Best Practice Guide which has a plethora of helpful information and insights for business merchants just getting started on Pinterest.
Join Pinterest group Boards. Group boards are shared boards where many different users are invited to contribute. They are differentiated from personal boards by the use of a special group icon. Pinners who follow the group Board show up as followers of the owner only, but all Pins to the group Board, from all contributors, can show up in the home feed of every Pinner who follows it. Think of the implications of joining a group Board with a contributor who has over 100,000 followers! Use a tool like PinGroupie to determine which group Boards you should seek membership to.
This makes me sad. Months ago when I first signed on to Pinterest, it was a wonderland full of awesome ideas, cool crafts, and amazing recipes shared. I logged on to Pinterest daily, sometimes a couple times a day. Now every time I sign on, it’s nothing but a giant ad board. Having to weed through everyone’s ads and marketing of themselves just to find those same cool crafts and recipes isn’t worth the effort anymore, and now I rarely use Pinterest. Think about that. The more companies use Pinterest to pimp themselves out, the faster it’s going to fade, because the original users are becoming more like me.

Traffic is what makes a website tick. Without the right kind of traffic coming in, it’s simply not possible to grow your web presence and increase your online sales. Even though there are many paid and free ways to generate relevant website traffic, Pinterest can leave many of these methods in the dust when applied properly.Given the popularity of Pinterest and the way it has grown, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that it can help you get even more referral traffic than YouTube and LinkedIn, combined. However, you won’t be able to generate traffic unless and until Pinterest users…
Right now, Pinterest has only confirmed they are using hashtags for certain specific searches. These hashtag searches (say “Bali”) are, allegedly, shown in a chronological order. Meaning fresh pins with hashtags (up to 20, but I wouldn’t overdo it to keep your descriptions tidy) are more likely to appear in those searches and thus able to create the coveted engagement. Pinterest has said they are working on new uses for hashtags so better not skip them (even though old guides will tell you to do so!)
If you use the Pinterest tag or send us mobile app activity, you must tell your website and app visitors that their information will be shared with third parties for online behavioral advertising, and that they can opt out of online behavioral advertising through their Pinterest personalization settings, the AdChoices website optout.aboutads.info (if you use the Pinterest tag), or their mobile ad identifier settings (if you share app activity data with us).
With Pinterest, you can easily review what your competitors — and the companies in your industry that are more established than yours — are doing. This will allow you to discover which tactics they’re using on the platform and see what’s working for their audience members. You can also look at the content your audience Pins as well as who they’re following and interacting with.
I really, really like Pinterest, but I just read an article about Pinterest’s scary terms of service! It’s making me think about removing all the content I have on there. And I’m wondering how you or I can ethically go on promoting them? I had to go look up the terms of service myself and was apalled that by posting your own original content you are giving Cold Brew Labs irrevocable rights to your artwork! Here’s an exact copy and paste “By making available any Member Content through the Site, Application or Services, you hereby grant to Cold Brew Labs a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free license, with the right to sublicense, to use, copy, adapt, modify, distribute, license, sell, transfer, publicly display, publicly perform, transmit, stream, broadcast, access, view, and otherwise exploit …..”
Thanks for the advice, Tamara. I’ve been marketing on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and even a little on Flickr. And I’m working on producing blog content now. I knew marketing efforts take longer than a month to be most effective- but after a month I am looking for ways to make improvements and how to better approach my marketing strategy. I feel like my actual marketing messages aren’t ideal- so I’m working on building the blog and filling it with useful content. I’m going to be blogging about what’s going on in our shop, our inspiration, free craft tutorials and crafty business advice- I think that will help with establishing myself as an expert and also building a stronger following. What do you think?
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!

While creating and sharing content for your Pinterest profile and marketing to users, be sure to keep your target audience in mind. Similar to the way you would when creating new products, developing your branding, or posting to other social networks, you want to ensure you’re pushing out content that appeals to your target audience, current customers, and buyer personas on Pinterest.


Promoted Pins (aka Pinterest ads) are a great way to get your Pins seen by more people, creating new exposure for your brand. But Promoted Pins can provide exposure well beyond what you pay for. Internal Pinterest data shows that advertisers get an average of 20 percent more organic clicks in the month following the launch of a Pinterest ad campaign.
Now, it’s not a good idea to create Pinterest Boards that are covered in nothing but pins from your own blog. One of the cardinal rules of social media is that you promote others more than yourself. With that said, it certainly behooves you to create Boards related to your content so that you can include your own posts as a small portion of each Board.
Then, I’m about to help you. Instead of rehearsing all the old news (like updating your profile pic and getting a business account. duh!) I tried to focus on very actionable items. Unique techniques I use every day that helped me drive a constant 5,000 visitors to my site. each. day. The information is based on official interviews and quite a couple of e-mail conversations with Pinterest (so no urban myths, sorry!), but also empirical evidence from stuff that worked out for me.
You can achieve all of these things for your business by following the Pinterest marketing strategies we reviewed and incorporating the available tools and resources to help you succeed as a business on the platform. So, sign up for a business account and begin creating unique and engaging content to market to your customers and followers on Pinterest.

@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right.
6 Ways to Promote Your Business With Pinterest Places: Do you use Pinterest to promote your business? Have you heard of Pinterest place pins? Whether you have a storefront, products or a travel aspect to your business, consider exploring the geographic elements of Pinterest. In this article you’ll learn six ways you can use Pinterest place pins to promote your business or products.

High quality is a must, as is size. Vertical Pins (2:30 – 600px x 900px) work well because they take up more space, making them stand out. Contrast these with square images (600px x 600px) to make your content eye-catching on the discovery feed. Be sure that your images (and website for that matter) are mobile-friendly: over 85% of searches are in the App.
The “People you reach” tab has some extremely valuable information. We always think within our niche, but our followers don’t. They might be interested in travel, DYI home decor, and recipes. It can be a very smart idea to toss in a couple of boards to cover these topics as well. Your end goal should always be engagement, and what better way to engage than with the topics your audience likes?
You may notice when browsing the web now that there are various Pin This–type tools throughout online content. These Pinterest social sharing buttons are found everywhere from the beginning of a post to the images throughout the post to the end of the post next to comment and other social share buttons. In a post on the blog, Resourceful Mommy, hovering over each image provides readers with a Pin It option.
Chrome Extension - Using the OneUp Chrome extension, you can easily schedule many images at once from any website, such as sunsets for example. You can choose which images from the website you want to post to social media, bulk update or individually update the descriptions and links for each post, then schedule them to be posted with a set interval (such as every 60 minutes), or choose custom dates and times for all of them.
Pinterest promoted pins will help you draw attention to a certain pin when you have something special or unique that you want to feature, such as an event, promotion or special article. They will also help you get exposure to people who don’t yet follow your business on Pinterest. Promoted pins are great for seasonal content, time-sensitive material or anything that you need to drive more drive attention to.
The “People you reach” tab has some extremely valuable information. We always think within our niche, but our followers don’t. They might be interested in travel, DYI home decor, and recipes. It can be a very smart idea to toss in a couple of boards to cover these topics as well. Your end goal should always be engagement, and what better way to engage than with the topics your audience likes?
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