When you follow and interact with other Pinterest users and their accounts, you’re able to initiate and maintain personal relationships between them and your business. This type of engagement has the potential to make your followers feel a level of loyalty towards your brand that keeps them coming back to your profile for inspiration, ideas, and to buy products.
I feel like Pinterest runs the risk of becoming cluttered if we encourage businesses to use it when it might not be the best channel for them. Part of content marketing is making sure your content fits your channel, and filling up Pinterest with promotional noise is likely to turn users off and could ruin the service altogether. I wrote a piece on that today on the D Custom blog…http://www.dcustom.com/three-things-youre-doing-wrong-on-pinterest/

Similar to other advertising channels, Pinterest has its own Tag, which is a piece of code that is applied to your website. With the Tag, you will be able to better measure the effectiveness of your campaigns, understand customer paths from engagements to conversions, define audiences for remarketing and track a number of events such as page visits, category views, searches, cart additions, checkouts, video views, signups and leads.
Join Pinterest group Boards. Group boards are shared boards where many different users are invited to contribute. They are differentiated from personal boards by the use of a special group icon. Pinners who follow the group Board show up as followers of the owner only, but all Pins to the group Board, from all contributors, can show up in the home feed of every Pinner who follows it. Think of the implications of joining a group Board with a contributor who has over 100,000 followers! Use a tool like PinGroupie to determine which group Boards you should seek membership to.
Firstly, only posting images of your product photos, although not an entirely poor Pinterest marketing strategy, is not ideal because it will only help you acquire a limited volume of users rather than grow your user base. To acquire volume and growth, you need to be pinning product-specific content (like product photos) as well as content that’s inclusive of your product but not solely trying to sell the product itself. This will help you create new customers rather than simply acquire existing ones.
For me, it’s more budget friendly when I use Tailwind to pin to my group boards. With Tailwind I pin around 50-100 a day. I only pay $9.99 a month for unlimited pins. With Board Booster, I’d have to pay something like $84/month! So with Board Booster, I only pin 45 pins a day which is only $10/month. It’s just more cost effective for me. It may not be for you. Also, I would change that ratio to more pins of YOUR blog and less of other ones. As for follower growth, I don’t suspect a scheduling tool would help; getting more on group boards yes, making your blog Pinterest friendly and your pins Pin friendly. 

18. Not telling anyone your business is on Pinterest. Use the networks you already have (Facebook, Twitter, word-of-mouth, etc.) to spread the word. You can use Constant Contact’s email templates to let subscribers know you’re on Pinterest. Adding a Pinterest logo to your website or blog will also help grow your following and act as a reminder to people who visit your website to pin your content.
Pinterest is one of the more versatile, affordable, and impactful marketing tools for businesses that are looking to convert more leads, drive traffic to their websites, and increase brand awareness to use. Plus, Pinterest users have the highest purchase intent of any other social media users. Let’s discuss some more ways small businesses, like yours, can benefit from creating a presence on Pinterest.

Pincodes are a unique code that work similarly to QR Codes and they help people find your brand and products on Pinterest. Pincodes can be placed on any of your physical brand assets like brochures, business cards, packaging and displays and whenever people scan them with their Pinterest app, it’ll direct them to your content destination on Pinterest.
If your target audience is active on Pinterest, it is definitely worth adding it to your marketing mix. For categories such as food, travel, home decoration, fashion and beauty, Pinterest is an obvious choice. However, it can be made to work for practically any type of business, whether you sell products or services. Many service-based businesses do very well on Pinterest.
Take some time to search around Pinterest to get an idea of what types of images draw your eye to them most quickly. Are there certain colors that grab your attention? Do you tend to click on images with superimposed headings? Take some time to play around with your blog post images and notice which articles are receiving the most interaction from the Pinterest community.
May I ask why you use 2 different scheduling companies to schedule pins ? I’m using boardbooster to schedule my content to group boards and my own boards and also pinning others’ pins on my own boards. 70 % are others pins and 30% my own. Im pinning about 60 to 70 pins/day and the follower growth has been miserable. I’m also on group boards (currently about 10+ group boards.working on joining more). I’m trying to understand if it helps to use tailwind too vs just board booster
Do you use the interval function to drip out your pins over time to your group boards at all? I was doing this to get my pins to drip out over 1 month, but then I read something on Lady Boss League about dripping them out over a week. So I’m giving that a go. So long as I publish a new post once a week, I’ll have fresh content going out to my group boards consistently.

Lastly, I think when you are speaking to those new to Pinterest and especially to marketers, you need to remind them of the stated Pin Etiquette: “Avoid Self Promotion. Pinterest is designed to curate and share things you love. If there is a photo or project you’re proud of, pin away! However, try not to use Pinterest purely as a tool for self-promotion.” I just pinned my own screen shot image, but marked it as such to start a board on Pinterest tips.
The “People you reach” tab has some extremely valuable information. We always think within our niche, but our followers don’t. They might be interested in travel, DYI home decor, and recipes. It can be a very smart idea to toss in a couple of boards to cover these topics as well. Your end goal should always be engagement, and what better way to engage than with the topics your audience likes?
Hi Elise – Facebook actually has an app that will let you pull your pins into your Facebook page. It’s acting really wonky for me, though, so I’ll bet they’re still working out the kinks. Here’s the link – http://apps.facebook.com/pinterestapp/ Right now that App page is just re-routing to the Pinterest business page, so there seems to be some sort of issue, but I’ve seen business Pages use it, and it’s cool! Best of luck!
I know, there are countless Pinterest courses out there. Some cost up to 300 USD. Are they better? I don’t know. I just know that I put everything I know about Pinterest into this guide and didn’t hold anything back. This guide is my way of saying thanks to all those countless guides that helped me starting out as a travel blogger more than 3 years ago.
So, how can your business use Pinterest as a marketing tactic to help improve your brand awareness and conversions? In this guide, we’ll cover the answer to that question as well as which Pinterest marketing strategies you should implement, how small businesses can benefit from the platform, and which tools you can use to ensure your Pinterest marketing strategy works for your business.
This is only a guess. But Pinterest has indeed confirmed that they are working on various techniques to recognize both the author and the context of any picture. I’m fairly sure Pinterest already has a good idea what any given pictures is about, even if you provided no metadata whatsoever (so any empty description and no url, etc). It might be a good choice to incorporate easily recognizable landmarks, etc into your pin. The simpler, the better.

@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right.
I share Andrew’s perspective, but I would phrase it differently — be relevant! As a brand, before you jump in spend some time “listening” or observing to get an understanding of the platform and then map your Pinterest strategy accordingly. Look at your target audience, the types of boards they’ve created, and the content they’re pinning. How does your content fit in with that? How does Pinterest fit with your overall social marketing/business strategy?

Your growth story is very inspiring. You already had over 600 followers though! That’s a lot compared to my measly 30. Do you think your strategies help from the very beginning? I’m probably still too new to contribute to group pages, though I feel I have valuable content. If you have advice for beginners that is different from what you’ve already mentioned, I’d really appreciate hearing it!

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