How to Run a Pinterest Contest Without Breaking the Rules: Are you aware of Pinterest contest rules and regulations? After many businesses misused the relaxed format, Pinterest revised its contest rules. They now require that contests be easy to enter, spam-free and in alignment with Pinterest branding guidelines. This article explains what you need to know to run successful and compliant Pinterest contests.
Hi Elise – Facebook actually has an app that will let you pull your pins into your Facebook page. It’s acting really wonky for me, though, so I’ll bet they’re still working out the kinks. Here’s the link – http://apps.facebook.com/pinterestapp/ Right now that App page is just re-routing to the Pinterest business page, so there seems to be some sort of issue, but I’ve seen business Pages use it, and it’s cool! Best of luck!
I pin ten times per day, 7 of my own pins and 3 of other peoples. I aim to pin my most popular content first, found in my Google or Pinterest analytics. Then I pin seasonal content, and then lastly, my new content. I primarily focus on personal boards instead of group boards and I check my Tailwind stats one time per month to inform me on how it’s working. I check my analytics to see how my pins are performing there as well.

The pin/save button appears directly on your website’s product pages, making it easy for browsers to pin (and share) a link to their own Boards. 5x more easy to be precise. Immediately you’re making it simple for potential customers to engage with you and you’re gaining knowledge of who has pinned content from your website; providing you with an opportunity to engage right back.
Pinterest has confirmed they do crawl the website linked to the pin. So, it’s quite important that your pin & pin description match the actual content on your website. For now, they are probably just scraping the metadata (descriptions, title, etc). But still, it’s nice to know that an SEO optimized article will also send a stronger signal to Pinterest.
Until Pinterest Search Ads are available to all, we have to lump all our keywords into one ad group with one bid. This means, if you keep your bids low (as I do), your Pin may never be displayed for the more competitive keywords. Unless you have an enormous budget, you may be OK with that. If you find that some keywords which are important to you are not generating impressions, start a new ad group with a higher bid per click to generate the exposure you need.
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!

15. Social Media Examiner: Social Media Examiner doesn’t exclusively publish Pinteret or visual marketing tips, but the ones that are published here are of the highest quality as they are written by people who have a vast knowledge of Pinterest. So make sure you read their posts on using Pinterest for business regularly. They also have some good articles on visual marketing.
Hector – it’s possible that the difference actually has to do with the pictures themselves. When I pin a blog post that has awesome content but a so-so picture that’s not very evocative, it normally doesn’t do very well on Pinterest. But when the photo is a great one, it gets passed around like crazy! I know it’s tough to find business-related photos that aren’t cheesy stock images, but it’s worth doing some digging. I’d advise testing out some different photos out and tracking your results per photo. Best of luck!
In short, Pinterest is the perfect place to start your sales funnel from. With Pinterest pins, you can build awareness around your brand and products, develop consumer interest, and increase traffic, but then you can also use Pinterest to boost in-store and online sales and influence users to take actions like sign-up to, purchase and install products.

If you go the video route, make sure to keep it short, hook viewers within the first few seconds, and optimize it to play without sound. Also make sure your logo appears at the beginning or throughout the entirety of your video, so people know what they’re watching—and who it comes from. Branded content is actionable and trustworthy, so tends to perform well on Pinterest.
Claiming your website isn’t difficult, you just need to be able to access and edit your website’s HTML code. There are two ways to claim your site and it’s either by using a meta tag or by uploading an HTML file, the instructions for which can be found on Pinterest’s Claim Your Website help center page. Check out that page for all the instructions you need to claim your website and there’s also platform-specific set up instructions if you need help tailored to your particular ecommerce platform, such as Shopify or BigCommerce.
Create Boards that tell a story or create a lifestyle – don’t just create product Boards. 72% say the platform helps them to find ideas for everyday life: Use insights (below) to understand what stories appeal to your target audience and use this to fuel your Board ideas and give your followers the inspiration they’re after. Stay true to your brand, get creative and have fun.
Just like other platforms, Pinterest wants you consistently using the platform! As a Pinterest marketer, avoid inconsistency and plopping a bunch of pins on the platform once a week or so. Get into a regular habit of pinning when your audience is using the platform. Using a Pinterest scheduler like Tailwind can help you choose the ‘smart’ times to pin as well as creating a queue so that you don’t have to manually pin, especially if you have difficulty staying consistent. (Psst—want to hear more about Tailwind? Check out my posts here).
Right now, Pinterest has only confirmed they are using hashtags for certain specific searches. These hashtag searches (say “Bali”) are, allegedly, shown in a chronological order. Meaning fresh pins with hashtags (up to 20, but I wouldn’t overdo it to keep your descriptions tidy) are more likely to appear in those searches and thus able to create the coveted engagement. Pinterest has said they are working on new uses for hashtags so better not skip them (even though old guides will tell you to do so!)
Establish relationships with other bloggers, influencers and pinners. Instagram isn’t the only place where you might want to work with influencers. For example, Target has worked with top Pinterest accounts Oh Joy, Wit & Delight, and Poppytalk. Pinterest is currently looking into creating a tool that makes it easier for brands to work with influencers (Instagram has already done this). Working with influencers might involve creating community Boards, giving influencers products to artfully style and Pin to. If you pursue this type of influencer/Pinterest marketing, you might also ask the influencer to curate content from other creators (kind of like a style guide).
I check their Blog, Pinterest for Business page, and Pinterest for Developers page frequently. I’m not a programmer, so sometimes I need help with the technical language. I love listening to Cynthia Sanchez’s Oh So Pinteresting podcast for assistance in this area. She interviews interesting and knowledgeable individuals who keep me current! I appreciate her tips too. The action steps she suggests are achievable and make a difference in my Pinning!
Sarah, I am one of those small, non-visual businesses. I am a Licensed Professional Counselor in private practice. Half my practice is clinical and the other half is actually consulting with psychotherapists and allied health professionals to help them build strong practices. I am having success with Pinterest and am very excited about the possibilities. It’s too soon to be spouting off my stats (I’ve been on Pinterest less than 2 months) but anecdotal evidence is really great! In fact, I expect Pinterest to bring in a whole new band of prospects AND possibly rival my Twitter stats (which is my biggest referral source from social media).
I really, really like Pinterest, but I just read an article about Pinterest’s scary terms of service! It’s making me think about removing all the content I have on there. And I’m wondering how you or I can ethically go on promoting them? I had to go look up the terms of service myself and was apalled that by posting your own original content you are giving Cold Brew Labs irrevocable rights to your artwork! Here’s an exact copy and paste “By making available any Member Content through the Site, Application or Services, you hereby grant to Cold Brew Labs a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free license, with the right to sublicense, to use, copy, adapt, modify, distribute, license, sell, transfer, publicly display, publicly perform, transmit, stream, broadcast, access, view, and otherwise exploit …..”
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