My best Pinterest tip is to pin like your followers. Your followers do not pin from just 10:00-10:30 am every single weekday. Sure, you can schedule your pins out, but remember that your perfect follower (and possible blog reader) sleeps, eats, works, takes care of children, has doctor’s appointments, etc. They don’t have a schedule of when they pin, they pin when they can. Since I’ve started using Pinterest as just a regular person vs. blogger trying to drive traffic, I’ve seen my number of followers increase quickly. Of course, my tip may not work for everyone, but it doesn’t hurt to play with your pinning strategy to gauge results. Take a strategy and try it for 2 weeks, analyze, tweak, and happy pinning!
I find that one mistake people often make is to leave out keywords on their boards. Board names are searchable (though significantly less than actual pins). It’s vital to choose board names with a strong SEO. For instance, ‘yummmy’ is not a good board name. It has no searchable context. Choose something like, ‘dessert recipes’ or even more specific, ‘pumpkin desserts’ instead.
The problem is, that people don’t get to pass it up. If they have chosen to use Flickr to display their work, for example, someone can go “pin” their image without the artist ever knowing, until they find it pinned all over the place and hosted on blogs. When licensing work, they may even choose to pass up a group they disagree with, say, AARP for example, yet that group can create a board to promote their work and go out and grab any image they like from the net. What then? What makes “pinning” inherently different than taking any image from anywhere and putting it on your website?
SocialPilot Lite is free to schedule up to 30 pins and post 10 times per day. Their individual plan is $10 a month and comes with considerably more. You can schedule up to 1000 posts in your queue and post 50 times per day. The content discovery tools are limited while the analytics they provide are non-existent in this basic package. Tailwind and even Buffer have a wider variety of Pinterest automation tools available for this pricing level.
Don’t make this mistake because pinning everything and anything clutter your pin boards. Disjointed pins can make your boards look unorganized and lack any kind of theme. Pinterest surfers like content to be organized so that they can easily find what they are looking for. Don’t be afraid to pin interesting content your audience would enjoy, but try to keep them connected to your business.
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
How are you and your family doing, I hope all is well. My name is Larry Ward Sr. I was searching through Pinterest for boards to follow. I came across your blogging post, I’m interested in being a blogger. I don’t have any experience how can I learn how to write good blogs. This is something I have been wanting to do for a very long time. Any advice you have to get me started on my journey would be appreciated. I love the details and sources that you provide. Thank you for all your help sincerely
Good points, Beth. I also think it’s important, as I pointed out in my blog post, that if a company is using Pinterest they actually lead it back to content, whether it’s a product or service on their website or content on their blog. It’s a perfect example for companies to implement a content marketing strategy and promote their brand through providing useful information (coupled with eye-catching images) and becoming a trusted resource. It’s so much less “in your face” and lessens the risk of potential customers getting annoyed with you spamming Pinterest with promos or pointless contests.
Something I’ve been struggling to figure out is how to pin many pins a day, while keeping a good chunk of them as pins from my own content. I only publish new content once a week. Let’s say I want to post 50% my content and 50% of others’, I would only be pinning two pins per day (one for my new post and one of someone else). Am I supposed to be pinning older content that’s already in those boards? If so, how often should I be doing that? I just don’t understand how people say to pin X number of pins per day and X amount should be your own content. Help! Thanks, Rachel

For me, it’s more budget friendly when I use Tailwind to pin to my group boards. With Tailwind I pin around 50-100 a day. I only pay $9.99 a month for unlimited pins. With Board Booster, I’d have to pay something like $84/month! So with Board Booster, I only pin 45 pins a day which is only $10/month. It’s just more cost effective for me. It may not be for you. Also, I would change that ratio to more pins of YOUR blog and less of other ones. As for follower growth, I don’t suspect a scheduling tool would help; getting more on group boards yes, making your blog Pinterest friendly and your pins Pin friendly.


I pin a minimum of 5-10 pins per day. Most of those pins are my own content and are being pinned to my own boards, along with a few group boards. How often you pin per day depends on how much content you are creating. There is no magic number. You have to figure out what works for you. It’s not detrimental to pin 10 times one day and 15 the next day.
Thanks so much for your wonderful comment! I’m humbled by your warm words. As for making money on Pinterest, I think you need to focus on list building via Pinterest first. From there you can start creating pins to landing pages and then upsell once they are on your email list. You can also create pins that direct to Amazon or to your digital product. I hope this helps!
Sometimes your audience wants to know more about you, your processes, and your accomplishments before they sign on or commit. While you can show what you’re all about on platforms like Facebook, studies show Pinterest users spend slightly more time on the platform compared to Facebook — 34 minutes vs. 33 minutes. When you have a more supportive fan base, you should tailor your content in such a way, which makes you relatable. For example, let’s say you wanted to promote your company culture or a new face in your organization. Use Pinterest to share this information. Wistia, a video hosting tool, shares content like the pets of company employees and behind the scenes images of their annual event WistiaFest.

Enter Pingroupie. This free tool’s entire purpose is to list group boards that are currently live. You could reach out to these board owners and see if they’d be open to doing a group board with you, or if they’re in need of contributors like you. If you’re able to contribute relevant, non-spammy content of your own, there could be a lot to gain for your brand.

For example, Pinterest demonstrated by showing a chart of how moms pick clothes – moms will go on Pinterest to look for a denim jacket.  They will tunnel search for an authentic denim jacket, but then they will find something else during the search and widen their search again.  Slowly, going between what they searched for and new recommendations they discover, they will narrow down their search and eventually they’ll make a purchase – maybe not even ending with a denim jacket, but a pixie white suede jacket instead!
I’m a crafter and Etsy shop owner. I’ve been using Pinterest for nearly a month now and it’s generating a little bit of traffic, but not as much as I would like. I’m going to fine comb my way through this list over the weekend and see if I can implement some changes that will allow me to optimize my use of Pinterest. I honestly had no idea there were as many as 56 ways to market with Pinterest- so impressed!
I really, really like Pinterest, but I just read an article about Pinterest’s scary terms of service! It’s making me think about removing all the content I have on there. And I’m wondering how you or I can ethically go on promoting them? I had to go look up the terms of service myself and was apalled that by posting your own original content you are giving Cold Brew Labs irrevocable rights to your artwork! Here’s an exact copy and paste “By making available any Member Content through the Site, Application or Services, you hereby grant to Cold Brew Labs a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free license, with the right to sublicense, to use, copy, adapt, modify, distribute, license, sell, transfer, publicly display, publicly perform, transmit, stream, broadcast, access, view, and otherwise exploit …..”
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