You’re also able to show your audience and followers how much their support and business means to you through giveaways, videos of your behind the scenes work, latest company news, product information, promotions, and discount codes. Creating and maintaining these business-to-customer routines early on humanizes your brand, sets the tone for what your company will be known for, and shows customers how you intend to grow with them in mind.
You’re also able to show your audience and followers how much their support and business means to you through giveaways, videos of your behind the scenes work, latest company news, product information, promotions, and discount codes. Creating and maintaining these business-to-customer routines early on humanizes your brand, sets the tone for what your company will be known for, and shows customers how you intend to grow with them in mind.

To make the most of your Pinterest ads, always create a Pinterest post-click landing page to direct all of your traffic to. This type of dedicated page is the best place for users to “land” after clicking your pin, and will significantly help convert prospects into leads because it’s free of distractions (e.g. header navigation, social icons, etc.).
Pinterest has confirmed they do crawl the website linked to the pin. So, it’s quite important that your pin & pin description match the actual content on your website. For now, they are probably just scraping the metadata (descriptions, title, etc). But still, it’s nice to know that an SEO optimized article will also send a stronger signal to Pinterest.
Followers on Pinterest matter because it allows Pinterest to monitor your content. If your followers see your content and they like it, Pinterest will know which of your pins to show more.  But if your followers don’t engage with your content, for example spam accounts, then Pinterest thinks the content isn’t that good and they will not push it. So it doesn’t matter if you have 1 follower or 100,000 followers, you want them to be liking your stuff.  

Hector – it’s possible that the difference actually has to do with the pictures themselves. When I pin a blog post that has awesome content but a so-so picture that’s not very evocative, it normally doesn’t do very well on Pinterest. But when the photo is a great one, it gets passed around like crazy! I know it’s tough to find business-related photos that aren’t cheesy stock images, but it’s worth doing some digging. I’d advise testing out some different photos out and tracking your results per photo. Best of luck!


The problem is, that people don’t get to pass it up. If they have chosen to use Flickr to display their work, for example, someone can go “pin” their image without the artist ever knowing, until they find it pinned all over the place and hosted on blogs. When licensing work, they may even choose to pass up a group they disagree with, say, AARP for example, yet that group can create a board to promote their work and go out and grab any image they like from the net. What then? What makes “pinning” inherently different than taking any image from anywhere and putting it on your website?


If you've been using Pinterest lately, you might have noticed three kinds of pins: those from people you follow, those that are suggested for you, and promoted pins, also known as Pinterest Ads. Over the last five years, as the CEO of AutomateAds.com, I've managed and scaled tens of millions of dollars in ad budgets across Facebook, Google Adwords, Instagram and more. I've been testing Pinterest's promoted pins product for well over a year now, and I believe it's a massive opportunity for brands to drive sales and leads.


To market to your target audience, you should create a Pinterest business account. As mentioned, this free account provides you with access to Pinterest Analytics (which we’ll review in more detail shortly) and other handy marketing features such as a profile that clearly states you’re a business, Pinterest widgets, and Pinterest tag. If you already have a Pinterest account and want to convert it into a Pinterest business account, you can also do that without losing any of your content or work.
I’ve done some thinking this past week, and I really don’t have much of a Pinterest strategy 🙂  But I do think what has worked for me, and would be my best tip, is that almost all my pins are things I truly like and that fit in my niche of homemade and DIY projects.  People who choose to follow me on Pinterest know that they will find pins and more ideas on the same subjects that brought them to my blog.  And if they found me on Pinterest first and have then come over to my blog, they will again find lots of info on the same subject as the type of pins they found interesting. I think this gives some continuity to my brand and continues to give me an authentic voice on my subject.  

WHY: Not only does this help you get found and gives Pinterest a better idea of what you’re all about so they can recommend your account and your boards to other people, but strangers who happen to come across your account don’t have to spend hours determining what you pin about and if they should follow you. So you improve your chances of being found by the right people.

18. Not telling anyone your business is on Pinterest. Use the networks you already have (Facebook, Twitter, word-of-mouth, etc.) to spread the word. You can use Constant Contact’s email templates to let subscribers know you’re on Pinterest. Adding a Pinterest logo to your website or blog will also help grow your following and act as a reminder to people who visit your website to pin your content.
Pinterest recommends that you Pin something at least once per day, during peak times—which they’ve found to be evenings and weekends for U.S.-based brands. Pinterest also highlights that consistency is key—if you’re going to post a large number of posts over the course of a week, divide them up and post several per day rather than posting them all at once.
So, please whatever you do, don’t just post product photos. Do you remember that study done by The University of Minnesota? Well, diversity of pin was the 8th most important factor when users were deciding whether to follow an account. So, throw in some other boards that give your followers added value in order to avoid coming off as overly salesy.
I feel like Pinterest runs the risk of becoming cluttered if we encourage businesses to use it when it might not be the best channel for them. Part of content marketing is making sure your content fits your channel, and filling up Pinterest with promotional noise is likely to turn users off and could ruin the service altogether. I wrote a piece on that today on the D Custom blog…http://www.dcustom.com/three-things-youre-doing-wrong-on-pinterest/
Great post! I started using Pinterest over a week ago and my traffic increased dramatically! I really didn’t expect it! I have a little question… when I pin an image from my blog and get 100 repins for example, let’s say that this results in 500 views on my blog… shouldn’t I be gettin more and more traffic on the following days? I’ve noticed that my blog traffic only increaces when I pin…but I don’t understand how come my traffic is not multiplying as a result of the many repins I get. Instead my traffic goes back down until the next time I pin…

SocialPilot Lite is free to schedule up to 30 pins and post 10 times per day. Their individual plan is $10 a month and comes with considerably more. You can schedule up to 1000 posts in your queue and post 50 times per day. The content discovery tools are limited while the analytics they provide are non-existent in this basic package. Tailwind and even Buffer have a wider variety of Pinterest automation tools available for this pricing level. 
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