Just like other platforms, Pinterest wants you consistently using the platform! As a Pinterest marketer, avoid inconsistency and plopping a bunch of pins on the platform once a week or so. Get into a regular habit of pinning when your audience is using the platform. Using a Pinterest scheduler like Tailwind can help you choose the ‘smart’ times to pin as well as creating a queue so that you don’t have to manually pin, especially if you have difficulty staying consistent. (Psst—want to hear more about Tailwind? Check out my posts here).
The pin/save button appears directly on your website’s product pages, making it easy for browsers to pin (and share) a link to their own Boards. 5x more easy to be precise. Immediately you’re making it simple for potential customers to engage with you and you’re gaining knowledge of who has pinned content from your website; providing you with an opportunity to engage right back.
I’m not an alarmist. I like safe, simple rules and guidelines that stay consistent over time. I don’t think Pinterest is any different. Over time, Pinterest marketing has evolved (hey, hashtags) but the foundation of keywords and vertical images has not. Human interaction with Pinterest has changed. In this post, I’ll be sharing the main principles to a solid Pinterest marketing strategy.
Right now, Pinterest has only confirmed they are using hashtags for certain specific searches. These hashtag searches (say “Bali”) are, allegedly, shown in a chronological order. Meaning fresh pins with hashtags (up to 20, but I wouldn’t overdo it to keep your descriptions tidy) are more likely to appear in those searches and thus able to create the coveted engagement. Pinterest has said they are working on new uses for hashtags so better not skip them (even though old guides will tell you to do so!)

If you have top evergreen content or seasonal content, I highly recommend creating new pin images for those same landing posts. I have been doing this with success for the last few months and getting new visits and traffic from older blog posts that had already performed well on the platform. You can update the post with the fresh pins, as well as add them using the “+” bar on the Pinterest platform.
My wife got me into Pinterest which I initially just wrote off as “another” social media site. Great article Beth. I will have to follow you and see how to use all these techniques first-hand. It seems like the web in general is evolving into a more picture oriented communication medium. Pinterest is the future, here now. I can see Google having a picture based search only option in the not too distant future.

You’re also able to show your audience and followers how much their support and business means to you through giveaways, videos of your behind the scenes work, latest company news, product information, promotions, and discount codes. Creating and maintaining these business-to-customer routines early on humanizes your brand, sets the tone for what your company will be known for, and shows customers how you intend to grow with them in mind.
Pincodes are a unique code that work similarly to QR Codes and they help people find your brand and products on Pinterest. Pincodes can be placed on any of your physical brand assets like brochures, business cards, packaging and displays and whenever people scan them with their Pinterest app, it’ll direct them to your content destination on Pinterest.

The problem is, that people don’t get to pass it up. If they have chosen to use Flickr to display their work, for example, someone can go “pin” their image without the artist ever knowing, until they find it pinned all over the place and hosted on blogs. When licensing work, they may even choose to pass up a group they disagree with, say, AARP for example, yet that group can create a board to promote their work and go out and grab any image they like from the net. What then? What makes “pinning” inherently different than taking any image from anywhere and putting it on your website?
18. Not telling anyone your business is on Pinterest. Use the networks you already have (Facebook, Twitter, word-of-mouth, etc.) to spread the word. You can use Constant Contact’s email templates to let subscribers know you’re on Pinterest. Adding a Pinterest logo to your website or blog will also help grow your following and act as a reminder to people who visit your website to pin your content.
You’ll also see which boards your Pins are included in, which can give you a sense of how people think about your business and your products, and spark new ideas for how to position your Pinterest efforts. And you’ll get information about the demographics and interests of people who interact with your Pins, providing valuable insight to help you target your strategy to precisely the right audience.
To promote your Pinterest account and content, you should share your Pins, images, and videos in other areas to improve your chances of being seen and followed. For example, you can claim your business’ Pinterest account on Instagram, Etsy, and YouTube so your followers can easily learn about the other platforms you’re on and how they can view more of your content. Additionally, claiming your account will provide access to analytics and data on all of these Pins so you can see the other networks your audience is most interested in.
May I ask why you use 2 different scheduling companies to schedule pins ? I’m using boardbooster to schedule my content to group boards and my own boards and also pinning others’ pins on my own boards. 70 % are others pins and 30% my own. Im pinning about 60 to 70 pins/day and the follower growth has been miserable. I’m also on group boards (currently about 10+ group boards.working on joining more). I’m trying to understand if it helps to use tailwind too vs just board booster
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