Claiming your website isn’t difficult, you just need to be able to access and edit your website’s HTML code. There are two ways to claim your site and it’s either by using a meta tag or by uploading an HTML file, the instructions for which can be found on Pinterest’s Claim Your Website help center page. Check out that page for all the instructions you need to claim your website and there’s also platform-specific set up instructions if you need help tailored to your particular ecommerce platform, such as Shopify or BigCommerce.
When you follow and interact with other Pinterest users and their accounts, you’re able to initiate and maintain personal relationships between them and your business. This type of engagement has the potential to make your followers feel a level of loyalty towards your brand that keeps them coming back to your profile for inspiration, ideas, and to buy products.
Yeah, I’m seeing the same things, Linda – that was the inspiration for the document. I’ve also been working with my clients on getting started with Pinterest marketing, and the main issue that I see is a lack of focus or strategy. I think because Pinterest is so much fun, people just sort of leap in, pin a couple of images, and hope for the best. But strategy is just as important with Pinterest as it is with other social media tools like Facebook or Twitter.
This will take you to Business Account Basics. If you scroll down that page, you will see a section entitled Profile. Here, you want to fill out each section, including uploading your logo where it says Picture. You also want to take a few minutes to write a description that is interesting and has a few keywords that people may use when they are searching for what your business does or the type of products your offer.
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
I don’t even know how many studies I’ve read on which color performed better than the other and how showing faces was a no-no. Pinterest has confirmed that these are false positives. A beauty pin without a face might be quite ridiculous and even though cold tones are said to perform not as good, a pin about a trip to Antartica would probably look weird with warm colors. If you are not sure about your design, produce alternatives and show them to a control group or just dish them out and focus on the pin that performs best.

Note: If you’re interested in learning more about what exactly Pinterest does for business, check out their Pinterest for Business article, their article on How to Start Using Pinterest For Your Business which includes sub-sections on how to increase brand awareness with Pinterest marketing, increase website traffic with Pinterest marketing, increase sales with Pinterest and how to increase conversions with Pinterest marketing. They even have a Pinterest Business Best Practice Guide which has a plethora of helpful information and insights for business merchants just getting started on Pinterest.
Optimize your website content for Pinterest sharing (Part Two): Consider watermarking your images, or adding text to them. If you’re using your own images on Pinterest, one of the best ways to help your image stand out is by adding a clear description to the image itself, or adding a watermark with your business name. Make sure it’s clear, but that it doesn’t block out the main subject of the photo.
13. Not adding a pin description or link source to pins. You can write up to 500 characters within a pin description so don’t skimp on the information you add! Use keywords related to your business, words or phrases people would search for, and relative hashtags to maximize your description’s context. When appropriate, link back to your website, other social networks, and your blog to drive traffic to your business.
If you’re familiar with Adobe Photoshop, it’s another tool you can use to create Pinterest content. If you want to use Photoshop to create your Pinterest images but need a crash course in how to actually use Photoshop, we recommend checking out Skillshare’s photoshop classes, a few of the best ones you can see curated in our 40+ Best Skillshare Classes for Business article.
I’ve been steering away from doing that lately, however (even though I recommended it in this post) because I do have some concerns about using someone else’s image in my posts. I do wonder about the legality of that, with regards to copyright. But you can make your own call about whether or not it’s the right decision for you. That embed option is available on any pin, though.
Pinterest is one of the more versatile, affordable, and impactful marketing tools for businesses that are looking to convert more leads, drive traffic to their websites, and increase brand awareness to use. Plus, Pinterest users have the highest purchase intent of any other social media users. Let’s discuss some more ways small businesses, like yours, can benefit from creating a presence on Pinterest.
But they will only show your first 5 pins after midnight UTC in the following tab. Then they will show the next 5 pins of the next person you follow and so on. Only when this reservoir is exhausted will they show your next 5 pins. This is the very reason it’s so important to share content throughout the day, start with your best, and not share it all at once.
Once you’ve made the audience decisions, choose a maximum cost-per-click bid. Remember, it’s the amount you’d be willing to pay per click, so you’ll never pay more than that. However, you won’t necessarily have to pay such a high amount, especially since there’s not that much competition with early adopters. For example, one of my clients put $1 as her maximum, but was only charged $0.13 per click.
Pinterest does not offer the option to automatically sort boards alphabetically. There are unofficial browser extensions that may be able to alphabetise boards; however, these extensions are not endorsed by Pinterest and should be used with caution. Alternatively, you can manually organise your boards alphabetically by dragging and dropping them into the desired order.
As a general rule, you want your boards to be 50 percent about your business and 50 percent about the interests of your audience that tie back to your business. By pinning your audience interest as well as your own content, you will entice them to engage with you more on Pinterest. When they engage with you more, Pinterest will show users your content more frequently in their feed.
Pinterest’s conversion tracking tags are a little more complicated to set up than Facebook’s, and for merchants without coding experience it can be intimidating. One of the biggest advantages of this app is that it simplifies the process of setting up Pinterest conversion tracking tags for your store. And without the tracking tags, you wouldn’t be able to retarget accurately, or track the results from your Promoted Pin campaigns.
15. Social Media Examiner: Social Media Examiner doesn’t exclusively publish Pinteret or visual marketing tips, but the ones that are published here are of the highest quality as they are written by people who have a vast knowledge of Pinterest. So make sure you read their posts on using Pinterest for business regularly. They also have some good articles on visual marketing.
Hi Elise – Facebook actually has an app that will let you pull your pins into your Facebook page. It’s acting really wonky for me, though, so I’ll bet they’re still working out the kinks. Here’s the link – http://apps.facebook.com/pinterestapp/ Right now that App page is just re-routing to the Pinterest business page, so there seems to be some sort of issue, but I’ve seen business Pages use it, and it’s cool! Best of luck!
Include calls to action in the description. Pinterest doesn’t allow you to use direct calls to action (CTAs) in the promoted pin description, but that doesn’t mean your campaign should lack one. The targeted user needs to know what he is expected to do after seeing the pin. However, it is important to remain contextual and not sound too "salesy." Subtle CTAs such as "Sign up today for a free trial," or "Download this free guide," are things that users will still engage with.

Oftentimes, our own audiences are pretty small, which means we can’t get the reach and clicks we need. So, starting a new ad group using an actalike is a great way to find people with similar interests and behaviors and increase your impressions 30X while keeping CTR high. Start with a 1% similarity and branch out from there if you need still more.
With your Pinterest for business account, you can view analytics like what pins people are liking on your profile and what they save from your website, and you can learn more about what content users would like to see more of from your profile. You can also discover your audience metrics including their demographic information and what their other interests are.
This article has hopefully given you some insight into everything Pinterest offers for businesses and how businesses can make use of Pinterest to grow their reach and get Pinterest users started in their sales funnel. Pinterest marketing can be a lucrative way to grow your sales and revenue, but it all starts with creating great content that users can enjoy and focusing on the use-case of products rather than just the products themselves. Get started with Pinterest for business and see how you can grow your brand awareness in ways you’ve never done before.
I’m a crafter and Etsy shop owner. I’ve been using Pinterest for nearly a month now and it’s generating a little bit of traffic, but not as much as I would like. I’m going to fine comb my way through this list over the weekend and see if I can implement some changes that will allow me to optimize my use of Pinterest. I honestly had no idea there were as many as 56 ways to market with Pinterest- so impressed!
To make the most of your Pinterest ads, always create a Pinterest post-click landing page to direct all of your traffic to. This type of dedicated page is the best place for users to “land” after clicking your pin, and will significantly help convert prospects into leads because it’s free of distractions (e.g. header navigation, social icons, etc.).

By choosing the right category for your content to be shared in, your Pins and boards will become more searchable for users looking to discover content similar to that of your business. Users can search for specific categories on Pinterest or simply go to the “Categories” section of any profile on the platform to view all content related to the topic they’re searching.
One trick is to use various quotes from your most recent blog post or testimonials about your recent product and link to the website page many different times. You can also Pin the same Pin to different boards. For example, if you write a blog post about buying the best homeowners insurance, that can go on a board that only holds your blog posts, it can also go on a board that talks about financial planning and a board that talks about homeownership.
You can create targeted Pinterest Ads that build awareness, drive consideration and grow your sales, all through the Pinterest Ads Manager. Simply pick your pin, create a goal, decide your target audience, set your bid, pay for results, track what’s working and alter your tactics accordingly.  There are currently five different Pinterest Ads Manager campaigns:
Interest targeting and keyword targeting, however, hold more value than they’re typically given on other platforms. Choosing the right keywords is essential to ensuring your content pops up in the right searches organically, and the same is true for ad targeting. Choosing the right interests will help Pinterest place your ads with users who are most likely to be interested in seeing them when browsing.
Opt for a content-based approach. I remember seeing a recipe for a breakfast parfait and saving it, only to realize later on that the recipe was from Fage, a Greek yogurt brand, and it featured a specific flavor of yogurt none of their competitors had. It was a smart move, because content like recipes and DIY tutorials perform great on Pinterest. If you can feature your products in a similar way, this is a good strategy to try, especially for brand awareness campaigns.
Social media management tools help you schedule posts and organize your content on any social network, including Pinterest, prior to actually posting it. This way, you can ensure everything is shared and pushed out as planned. Social media management tools often have analytics capabilities as well, which you can use in tandem with Pinterest Analytics.
Just like other platforms, Pinterest wants you consistently using the platform! As a Pinterest marketer, avoid inconsistency and plopping a bunch of pins on the platform once a week or so. Get into a regular habit of pinning when your audience is using the platform. Using a Pinterest scheduler like Tailwind can help you choose the ‘smart’ times to pin as well as creating a queue so that you don’t have to manually pin, especially if you have difficulty staying consistent. (Psst—want to hear more about Tailwind? Check out my posts here).
This is only a guess. But Pinterest has indeed confirmed that they are working on various techniques to recognize both the author and the context of any picture. I’m fairly sure Pinterest already has a good idea what any given pictures is about, even if you provided no metadata whatsoever (so any empty description and no url, etc). It might be a good choice to incorporate easily recognizable landmarks, etc into your pin. The simpler, the better.

Pinterest has confirmed that this is their number one issue and they are investing in a lot of techniques to prevent these kinds of copyright infringements. At the very least, this will lead to the account being blocked. Once in a while, you may get e-mails from Pinterest saying they deleted one of your repins. This is nothing to worry about (as long as you are not the offender, obviously).
Start by providing lots of value on your website with free content. For example, a business coach could regularly publish content based on questions that clients ask during coaching sessions or in a Facebook group. The resulting blog articles and/or videos need to be extremely helpful and practical. They should provide ideas and information that people are searching for on Pinterest and Google.
Great article and have seen others like it but not as comprehensive with fantastic ideas. However… as this topic has come up lately, the Pinterest Terms of Use state: “If you decide to use the Application, subject to your compliance with the terms and conditions of these Terms, Cold Brew Labs grants you a limited non-exclusive, non-transferable, revocable license, without the right to sublicense, for you to install, access and use such Application on a mobile device that you own or control, solely for your personal and non-commercial purposes.”

For example, Pinterest demonstrated by showing a chart of how moms pick clothes – moms will go on Pinterest to look for a denim jacket.  They will tunnel search for an authentic denim jacket, but then they will find something else during the search and widen their search again.  Slowly, going between what they searched for and new recommendations they discover, they will narrow down their search and eventually they’ll make a purchase – maybe not even ending with a denim jacket, but a pixie white suede jacket instead!
Unlike Facebook and Instagram, both heavily focused on the social interaction between the users, Pinterest is a personal and private discovery platform.  It’s all about the user. You’re allowed to dream about personal topics (and even things you DON’T want to share) like trying to get pregnant or new fitness goals, because you can create a secret board and pin to it. 

Shopify users – this is really simple to do. Select the Add HTML tag option, copy the full meta tag, head over to your Shopify admin > online store > themes, on the appropriate theme click actions > edit code, click on the layout section, click theme.liquid and then paste the full meta tag onto a blank line directly under the opening tag. And then save. (More detailed instructions here).

Oftentimes, our own audiences are pretty small, which means we can’t get the reach and clicks we need. So, starting a new ad group using an actalike is a great way to find people with similar interests and behaviors and increase your impressions 30X while keeping CTR high. Start with a 1% similarity and branch out from there if you need still more.
Yeah, Anshul, I gotta admit – I didn’t see the point of Pinterest for a long time. I thought it was another pared-down Facebook knock-off. But then I started using it and can really see all the different ways it can be used for marketing. Plus, it’s now driving over HALF the traffic to my site, and I’m just getting started! I saw an immediate boost to traffic and mailing list signups. It’s been a huge boon for me.
You’re also able to show your audience and followers how much their support and business means to you through giveaways, videos of your behind the scenes work, latest company news, product information, promotions, and discount codes. Creating and maintaining these business-to-customer routines early on humanizes your brand, sets the tone for what your company will be known for, and shows customers how you intend to grow with them in mind.
No matter what you’re advertising — and no matter what platform you’re advertising on — it’s essential to include a call-to-action to encourage your audience to take the next step. By simply adding “Sign up”, “Learn more”, or “Visit site” to your Pinterest ad, you can inspire users to take action. By doing so you can increase conversions by up to 80%!
The connection between Pinterest and blogging is crystal clear and can be significantly beneficial to most bloggers. SEO, or search engine optimization, helps blogger content to be seen by the millions of potential readers conducting searches on sites such as Google and Bing each day. Imagine that Pinterest is one more place for potential readers to both find and share your content, but rather than searching on Google or Bing, they’re searching on Pinterest itself.
Followers on Pinterest matter because it allows Pinterest to monitor your content. If your followers see your content and they like it, Pinterest will know which of your pins to show more.  But if your followers don’t engage with your content, for example spam accounts, then Pinterest thinks the content isn’t that good and they will not push it. So it doesn’t matter if you have 1 follower or 100,000 followers, you want them to be liking your stuff.  
So, how do you do this? It all starts with creating great content – otherwise known as “pins” – to share on Pinterest. Unlike most social media platforms, success on Pinterest is not dependant on the number of followers your account has. Content on Pinterest has much more reach, and a reach that mimics the algorithm of search engines, so it’s much easier and more seamless for users to see and engage with your content even if they aren’t following you on Pinterest. This means that it’s still possible for brands to get excellent reach and engagement on their Pinterest content even if they don’t have a large following on the platform.
14. Not enabling “rich pins.” By enabling rich pins on your website, real-time pricing will accompany the images that are pinned from your website. Pinners will also be able to see if the product is in stock, where they can buy it, and if your item goes on sale. Pinterest even alerts the people who have repinned your product when the price drops! Make sure you’re enabling “rich pins.”
I find that one mistake people often make is to leave out keywords on their boards. Board names are searchable (though significantly less than actual pins). It’s vital to choose board names with a strong SEO. For instance, ‘yummmy’ is not a good board name. It has no searchable context. Choose something like, ‘dessert recipes’ or even more specific, ‘pumpkin desserts’ instead.
If you don’t want to spend the next few months in trial and error, I highly recommend investing in a good Pinterest course. Not only will that polish any mistakes that you might be making with your Pinterest account, but it will help you form a bullet proof strategy! Start by taking the Pinterest Primer free course here and do your research online.
Shop the Look Pins are exclusive to the fashion and home decor sections of Pinterest and they allow users to easily find and purchase items from the pin. Users can recognize Shop the Look Pins by the small white dots that call out the items in the pin that are for sale, and users can tap the white dot to be directed to the website where they can purchase the item.
Hashtags work similarly to keywords in that they help your pins be discoverable by Pinterest users. In this Ultimate Marketer’s Guide to Pinterest, hashtags have been described as being more of a categorical element, and less of a tool to help your content show up in Pinterest search results, so don’t rely on them as heavily as you would keywords to get your content in front of searching users.
Be sure to avoid board names that are more cute than descriptive. It is more important that your boards get found than to have a cute name. If you need some help thinking of optimal names for your boards, think about the keywords you might use to search for a certain topic. You can also take a look at the keywords on your website or the categories on your blog for more ideas on how to name your boards.

Specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-limited. What do you want to achieve and when do you want to achieve it by. Do you want to increase your followers to 100 by the end of the quarter; or do you want a Pinterest ad to generate at least five bathroom tile sales by the end of the month? Being specific gives you a goal to aim for, it focuses your Pinterest marketing tools, and it helps you to monitor (and learn from) your successes.
I feel like Pinterest runs the risk of becoming cluttered if we encourage businesses to use it when it might not be the best channel for them. Part of content marketing is making sure your content fits your channel, and filling up Pinterest with promotional noise is likely to turn users off and could ruin the service altogether. I wrote a piece on that today on the D Custom blog…http://www.dcustom.com/three-things-youre-doing-wrong-on-pinterest/

Those comments don’t really address what I was bringing up. “You” (everyone) is assigning a value to all these “gorgeous images” that 99% of the time, are not being offered up for free use or license by/to Pinterest and users. Yes, “you”‘re using these valuable works to drive traffic and build a network – all commercial uses without permission from the artist.
I pin ten times per day, 7 of my own pins and 3 of other peoples. I aim to pin my most popular content first, found in my Google or Pinterest analytics. Then I pin seasonal content, and then lastly, my new content. I primarily focus on personal boards instead of group boards and I check my Tailwind stats one time per month to inform me on how it’s working. I check my analytics to see how my pins are performing there as well.
Oh there’s one thing, you’ve got fill in your billing information and then it’s ready to roll. There’s also some really great analytics that come with Pinterest advertising to help you understand which search terms converted best in terms of clicks, how many repins a particular Promoted Pin received and so forth. I’ll be covering that in my next blog post.
Thanks for all the tips here. I’ve been growing on pinterest, too, but still need to accelerate things. I’ve been finding it challenging to get into more of the top decor boards (I do flooring) as many are closed to new pinners). I’ve also been collaborating with a friend of mine who has a larger following and more group boards, and we are helping each other.
Ads for financial products and services must clearly and prominently disclose all applicable terms and conditions as required by the local laws and regulations for any country or region your ad is targeting. Ads for consumer loans, for example, must disclose things like the APR, repayment period, fees and costs, penalties, and information about the lending institution.
@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right.
I am not paying for Tailwind’s paid plan just yet. Make sure that you have either archived or deleted your boards that have nothing to do with your niche. If you frequently share other bloggers’ work, you can create a board for that. I labeled mine “Bloggers Network”. Try to schedule at least 10-20 pins every single day, spread out on different boards and definitely start using Tribes! With Tailwind’s free account, you can share up to 80 pins to Tribes, and those should be your most popular pins from your blog because those are the ones that will get repinned by other pinners within the group. I hope this helps! If you’re struggling to nail down your niche and find your blogging voice, you can check out this post https://melissablevins.com/finding-your-voice-through-blogging 🙂 Let me know if you have any other questions!
If your target audience is active on Pinterest, it is definitely worth adding it to your marketing mix. For categories such as food, travel, home decoration, fashion and beauty, Pinterest is an obvious choice. However, it can be made to work for practically any type of business, whether you sell products or services. Many service-based businesses do very well on Pinterest.

Two of my consumer brand clients – Imperial Sugar and Dixie Crystals have seen a huge influx of traffic from Pinterest. In fact, in less than 30 days, Pinterest leapfrogged over Facebook in terms of referral traffic to our online recipe database. It’s the perfect medium for sharing recipes and tracking what types of recipes our community wants to see more of. You can find the boards at http://www.pinterest.com/imperialsugar and http://www.pinterest.com/dixiecrystals to see what we’ve done.


When you follow and interact with other Pinterest users and their accounts, you’re able to initiate and maintain personal relationships between them and your business. This type of engagement has the potential to make your followers feel a level of loyalty towards your brand that keeps them coming back to your profile for inspiration, ideas, and to buy products.
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