Thanks so much! So glad you found tips for your Pinterest followers and Pinterest marketing strategy. As for those types of group boards, I wouldn’t worry too much. As a group owner of three group boards, I don’t police them too much so I would suspect many of bloggers do the same! Just make sure to hit shuffle if you schedule your pins that way with Tailwind!
Similar to other social networks, Pinterest contains a plethora of images and videos. Not only do you want to ensure you’re posting images and videos that will help you promote your brand and market your products/ services, but you’ll also want to ensure they stand out against all of the others on the platform. Otherwise, why would a user choose to follow you over your competition?
I don’t even know how many studies I’ve read on which color performed better than the other and how showing faces was a no-no. Pinterest has confirmed that these are false positives. A beauty pin without a face might be quite ridiculous and even though cold tones are said to perform not as good, a pin about a trip to Antartica would probably look weird with warm colors. If you are not sure about your design, produce alternatives and show them to a control group or just dish them out and focus on the pin that performs best.
I’ve done some thinking this past week, and I really don’t have much of a Pinterest strategy 🙂  But I do think what has worked for me, and would be my best tip, is that almost all my pins are things I truly like and that fit in my niche of homemade and DIY projects.  People who choose to follow me on Pinterest know that they will find pins and more ideas on the same subjects that brought them to my blog.  And if they found me on Pinterest first and have then come over to my blog, they will again find lots of info on the same subject as the type of pins they found interesting. I think this gives some continuity to my brand and continues to give me an authentic voice on my subject.  
Our mission at Pinterest is to bring everyone the inspiration to create the life they love. We believe promoted content can play a big role in helping people create a life they love, which is why we want ads to be some of the best stuff you see on Pinterest. If you follow these guidelines, you’ll be all set for promoting great content on Pinterest.
You may notice when browsing the web now that there are various Pin This–type tools throughout online content. These Pinterest social sharing buttons are found everywhere from the beginning of a post to the images throughout the post to the end of the post next to comment and other social share buttons. In a post on the blog, Resourceful Mommy, hovering over each image provides readers with a Pin It option.
A note on ad groups. Your ad group is where you set your daily budget and all your targeting. It can be very tempting to break out your targeting into dozens of ad groups for easy analysis. If you have time for that, by all means, go ahead, but be aware that if your ad groups are below about $5/day, it’s going to take a long time to get a clear picture of what is working and what isn’t. After all, if you bid $.25, and your daily budget is $1, how long will it take before you know if those clicks are converting at a decent rate?
I don’t even know how many studies I’ve read on which color performed better than the other and how showing faces was a no-no. Pinterest has confirmed that these are false positives. A beauty pin without a face might be quite ridiculous and even though cold tones are said to perform not as good, a pin about a trip to Antartica would probably look weird with warm colors. If you are not sure about your design, produce alternatives and show them to a control group or just dish them out and focus on the pin that performs best.
Firstly, only posting images of your product photos, although not an entirely poor Pinterest marketing strategy, is not ideal because it will only help you acquire a limited volume of users rather than grow your user base. To acquire volume and growth, you need to be pinning product-specific content (like product photos) as well as content that’s inclusive of your product but not solely trying to sell the product itself. This will help you create new customers rather than simply acquire existing ones.
The more boards you have, the more pins your can schedule. It also depends on the group board you belong to. If there are only 10 contributors, your pins may flood their feed. If that’s the case you just have to pop in to your boards and not put those types of boards in your schedule. I belong to over a 100 group boards, but not all of them are in my Tailwind schedule. Many of them only have 5 or 10 contributors, so I don’t pin to them or have stopped pinning to them until they get more contributors.
When you publish your post, you pin that post to Pinterest. Usually people pin that first pin from their blog to their own board. Then you go to THAT board and pin THAT pin. You don’t make a new pin or go back to your blog and pin it again. You want to establish repins, or shares, on that ONE pin. So repin that ONE pin over and over again and others will repin that pin for you!
If you need a powerful Pinterest tool that truly digs deep and allows you to get the most out of your Pinterest account, Tailwind is probably a tool you’ll want to take a serious look at. Tailwind offers a free trial for your first 100 pins. This will help you get a feel for how things work. After your trial runs out, you can switch to the basic subscription of $9.99 a month.
May I ask why you use 2 different scheduling companies to schedule pins ? I’m using boardbooster to schedule my content to group boards and my own boards and also pinning others’ pins on my own boards. 70 % are others pins and 30% my own. Im pinning about 60 to 70 pins/day and the follower growth has been miserable. I’m also on group boards (currently about 10+ group boards.working on joining more). I’m trying to understand if it helps to use tailwind too vs just board booster
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