In the last podcast episode, we dove into how to make Pinterest work for your business. If you’re struggling to find your groove while creating your profile, boards, or pins, go back and listen to that episode. That will give you a really good foundation to jump into this week’s episode, where we’ll focus on how to create a Pinterest marketing strategy.
While Pinterest is well-known for its food, health and travel posts, it’s also a platform that can take ordinary or even dry topics and make them engaging and interesting. For example, website developers and financial planners all successfully use Pinterest to teach “dry” topics like banking and coding. Divorce attorneys and project managers can offer their most helpful content to those who are searching for answers or the latest inspirations on that topic.
My best Pinterest tip is to be focused. Once I identified WHY I use Pinterest, I was able to focus my boards and pins on what really matters – growing my Pinterest following, and attracting other bloggers and prospective clients. Each time I click to pin or repin I ask myself, “Is this pin of value to my target audience?” If the answer isn’t yes, I don’t pin it.

To start off with, using Pinterest for business purposes is something that Pinterest itself has spent time, effort and energy optimizing, and they’ve made it very easy for businesses to understand how to use Pinterest for business. Using Pinterest for business purposes is slightly different from most social media platforms and also slightly different from search engines like Google, so it’s important to approach your Pinterest marketing strategy a little bit differently as well.
Content marketing partners help brands develop a strong organic presence on Pinterest. They support the entire Pinterest campaign process, from sourcing content and publishing Pins to managing interactions with Pinners. Content marketing partners have great insight into what kinds of creative work best on Pinterest, so brands that start working with a content marketing partner tend to see a big jump in Pin performance.
Thank you so much for sharing. I started my blog a few months ago and it has been a slow process for me to setup and grow my blog. I haven’t had the traffic needed so I read your article to see if you had any tips. You have definitely added insight so I will try to implement tailwind to more followers. I am so excited and ready to see my blog grow and my followers increase.
Really awesome information . I worry about the copyright part of it all,but am very careful about what I pin or repin. I love Pinterest and use it almost daily. I add some of my products,but wasn’t sure if I could promote my business. Now that I read your 10 commandments I am going to share my work,but carefully. I didn’t know you could add prices. So glad that I can do that.

Until Pinterest Search Ads are available to all, we have to lump all our keywords into one ad group with one bid. This means, if you keep your bids low (as I do), your Pin may never be displayed for the more competitive keywords. Unless you have an enormous budget, you may be OK with that. If you find that some keywords which are important to you are not generating impressions, start a new ad group with a higher bid per click to generate the exposure you need.


I see from your website that your business is eDoctor but not really sure what services you offer. I would suggest that you carve out a tiny little sliver of your business and focus a Pinterest board just on that niche. The more specific those pin boards appear to be, the easier it will be for folks to find you. And, of course, throwing up a pin board is like hanging out your shingle. You will still need to let people know that you’re up on Pinterest or you’ll miss a lot of opportunities for your fans to actually find your board(s).
Pinterest, at its very core, is a fascinating — and addictive — blend of wish list creation, window shopping, and recipe hunting. When it comes to creating boards with the goal to sell products, Buyable Pin acts as a powerful tool. Just imagine the revenue this could bring in at Christmastime alone, when people are desperately hunting for that last-minute gift.
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
When I stopped following people and just focused on pinning my follower rate increased significantly. I get anywhere from 1 to 10 new followers a day when before I was lucky to get a few a week. After the death of BB I focused on manually pinning so I could better learn Pinterest. We are going on vacation soon and I think I might need to join TW for fear that the traffic I took so long to build will die. I also hope that it will give me the boost I need to finally hit 25k sessions and join Mediavine. Thanks for the tips! I’ll be implementing them as well 🙂
High quality is a must, as is size. Vertical Pins (2:30 – 600px x 900px) work well because they take up more space, making them stand out. Contrast these with square images (600px x 600px) to make your content eye-catching on the discovery feed. Be sure that your images (and website for that matter) are mobile-friendly: over 85% of searches are in the App.
Now, it’s not a good idea to create Pinterest Boards that are covered in nothing but pins from your own blog. One of the cardinal rules of social media is that you promote others more than yourself. With that said, it certainly behooves you to create Boards related to your content so that you can include your own posts as a small portion of each Board.
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