Alisa Meredith is the Content Marketing Manager at Tailwind – a Pinterest and Instagram scheduler and analytics platform. She is a sought-after speaker and teacher on Pinterest and Promoted Pins in particular, having spoken at Social Media Marketing World, Agents of Change and appearing on The Art of Paid Traffic and Social Pros podcasts. Alisa has invested heavily in becoming an expert in her craft – realizing (and loving) the fact that the learning never ends!  She lives in coastal North Carolina with her pampered pets Spike (who only eats eggs and Spam), Pepe the couchpotato Cavapoo, and more cats than she’d like to admit to.

One thing I have noticed and wondered about, when I first opened my Pinterest account I was able to leave comments on a persons profile, when someone started following me I would always comment ‘thanks for the follow’ or if I started following someone I would leave them a comment about how wonderful their boards were. Do you know anything of this feature??

Hi Elise – Facebook actually has an app that will let you pull your pins into your Facebook page. It’s acting really wonky for me, though, so I’ll bet they’re still working out the kinks. Here’s the link – http://apps.facebook.com/pinterestapp/ Right now that App page is just re-routing to the Pinterest business page, so there seems to be some sort of issue, but I’ve seen business Pages use it, and it’s cool! Best of luck!
Thank you for the detailed info. Joining Groups makes so much more sense. Great advice! I am a new blogger, http://www.justordinarymom.com, and still learning all the in’s and out’s of getting it started. Needless to say, it has been a challenge. I just posted my FIRST Pinterest post and I am just excited I was able to do it! Now just getting it seen.
I’m not an alarmist. I like safe, simple rules and guidelines that stay consistent over time. I don’t think Pinterest is any different. Over time, Pinterest marketing has evolved (hey, hashtags) but the foundation of keywords and vertical images has not. Human interaction with Pinterest has changed. In this post, I’ll be sharing the main principles to a solid Pinterest marketing strategy.
This is only a guess. But Pinterest has indeed confirmed that they are working on various techniques to recognize both the author and the context of any picture. I’m fairly sure Pinterest already has a good idea what any given pictures is about, even if you provided no metadata whatsoever (so any empty description and no url, etc). It might be a good choice to incorporate easily recognizable landmarks, etc into your pin. The simpler, the better.
Like Pinterest discusses in their Tips for Creating Customer Growth on Pinterest article, “too often, online marketing tactics focus on customers who already know what they want to buy—instead of expanding their reach to also include people earlier in their shopping journey,” which is an extremely important perspective to keep in mind when creating content for your Pinterest marketing strategy. To grow your reach on Pinterest, you need to focus on the early steps in a user’s shopping journey and that starts by telling a story and creating a need for the user to make them want to purchase your product to fulfill that need.

If you've been using Pinterest lately, you might have noticed three kinds of pins: those from people you follow, those that are suggested for you, and promoted pins, also known as Pinterest Ads. Over the last five years, as the CEO of AutomateAds.com, I've managed and scaled tens of millions of dollars in ad budgets across Facebook, Google Adwords, Instagram and more. I've been testing Pinterest's promoted pins product for well over a year now, and I believe it's a massive opportunity for brands to drive sales and leads.

Why do I think so? They already stepped away from displaying repin counts for single pins starting from fall 2017. The official version states that they did not want to give old pins (which went viral in, say, 2014) a visible higher authority and wanted to give new content a chance. But I guess they are also too aware that repins can be easily faked through bots.
If you need a powerful Pinterest tool that truly digs deep and allows you to get the most out of your Pinterest account, Tailwind is probably a tool you’ll want to take a serious look at. Tailwind offers a free trial for your first 100 pins. This will help you get a feel for how things work. After your trial runs out, you can switch to the basic subscription of $9.99 a month.
Now please, don’t go rushing off writing make-up tutorials on a travel blog. You’d probably have to solve this riddle through content curation. The more often somebody pins one of your pins, the more often they are shown your pins. This should be your ultimate goal. That being said, you could use it as inspiration as well, as even a travel blogger could be writing about an especially tasty local recipe.
Remember the user experience and don’t pin the same pins back to back on the same board. New content can take a while to take off on Pinterest. When you create new content, pin it to all relevant boards at least one time per day (use a 24-hour interval between if you’re using Tailwind). Then in a couple of weeks, look in Tailwind and see how the pins performed.
While Pinterest is well-known for its food, health and travel posts, it’s also a platform that can take ordinary or even dry topics and make them engaging and interesting. For example, website developers and financial planners all successfully use Pinterest to teach “dry” topics like banking and coding. Divorce attorneys and project managers can offer their most helpful content to those who are searching for answers or the latest inspirations on that topic.
Hi Robin – the best way to get people to repin your images is to create (and pin) awesome photos. So I would take REALLY good quality pics of your best work (maybe fun or particularly beautiful signs) and consider pining those. But before you pin anything at all, ask yourself if that image will be useful, entertaining, educational or interesting to your ideal clients who are on Pinterest. If the answer is no, I would keep looking.
22. Forgetting traditional social media best practices. Commenting isn’t the most popular form of engagement on Pinterest, but it is still important to monitor what your fans are saying and doing. Look for opportunities to respond and engage with potential customers too. Also, similar to other social networks, always remember to stick to a consistent content frequency that works for you.
Create Boards that tell a story or create a lifestyle – don’t just create product Boards. 72% say the platform helps them to find ideas for everyday life: Use insights (below) to understand what stories appeal to your target audience and use this to fuel your Board ideas and give your followers the inspiration they’re after. Stay true to your brand, get creative and have fun.
Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!
My wife got me into Pinterest which I initially just wrote off as “another” social media site. Great article Beth. I will have to follow you and see how to use all these techniques first-hand. It seems like the web in general is evolving into a more picture oriented communication medium. Pinterest is the future, here now. I can see Google having a picture based search only option in the not too distant future.
I feel like Pinterest runs the risk of becoming cluttered if we encourage businesses to use it when it might not be the best channel for them. Part of content marketing is making sure your content fits your channel, and filling up Pinterest with promotional noise is likely to turn users off and could ruin the service altogether. I wrote a piece on that today on the D Custom blog…http://www.dcustom.com/three-things-youre-doing-wrong-on-pinterest/
My best Pinterest tip is to be focused. Once I identified WHY I use Pinterest, I was able to focus my boards and pins on what really matters – growing my Pinterest following, and attracting other bloggers and prospective clients. Each time I click to pin or repin I ask myself, “Is this pin of value to my target audience?” If the answer isn’t yes, I don’t pin it.

But Pinterest is different and they follow a different approach. More to the point: My first viral pin, created in April 2015, now has more than 66.000 repins and still sends about 40 people to my site every day (click to see it, even though it looks oddly old-fashioned now). All in all, a bit less than 100.00 visitors. Do you know how many followers I had at that time? Less than 1.000 (around 800ish).

Tiffany! I love the way you write. I think you write the way you talk so I felt like I was sitting right there next to you and listening with perked ears! Thank you so much. You took a headache inducing topic and simplified it. This was my first time on your blog and I loved every minute of it. I am a new blogger so I needed to hear this. And that Milo Tree recommendation, I am onto it. Thanks again!
18. Not telling anyone your business is on Pinterest. Use the networks you already have (Facebook, Twitter, word-of-mouth, etc.) to spread the word. You can use Constant Contact’s email templates to let subscribers know you’re on Pinterest. Adding a Pinterest logo to your website or blog will also help grow your following and act as a reminder to people who visit your website to pin your content.
Don’t make this mistake because pinning everything and anything clutter your pin boards. Disjointed pins can make your boards look unorganized and lack any kind of theme. Pinterest surfers like content to be organized so that they can easily find what they are looking for. Don’t be afraid to pin interesting content your audience would enjoy, but try to keep them connected to your business.
Ad group. This is where you decide on your budget, where to display your ads, your target audience, and how long the ads will run. Also, depending on the objective, you can have more than one ad group in each campaign. For example, if you’re a clothing retailer, your campaign can focus on driving traffic to your website while each ad group is dedicated to specific products — one group for women’s dresses and another for men’s suits.

Note: If you’re interested in learning more about what exactly Pinterest does for business, check out their Pinterest for Business article, their article on How to Start Using Pinterest For Your Business which includes sub-sections on how to increase brand awareness with Pinterest marketing, increase website traffic with Pinterest marketing, increase sales with Pinterest and how to increase conversions with Pinterest marketing. They even have a Pinterest Business Best Practice Guide which has a plethora of helpful information and insights for business merchants just getting started on Pinterest. 

The creators of this software intended to help you maximize your Pinterest strategy. The Tailwind app works well for bloggers, business owners, social media managers, and beginners alike. It also supports Instagram besides Pinterest. The full list of included tools is too long to fully expand upon. However, here’s a sneak peek of what you can expect to get out of Tailwind.
As a general rule, you want your boards to be 50 percent about your business and 50 percent about the interests of your audience that tie back to your business. By pinning your audience interest as well as your own content, you will entice them to engage with you more on Pinterest. When they engage with you more, Pinterest will show users your content more frequently in their feed.
Pinterest is a highly reputable business, and use of their website is unlikely to give you a virus. However, it is possible to click on pins that lead to sites hosting malicious content, such as viruses or malware. Pinterest does not monitor the integrity of linked websites, so always be careful when leaving the main site. When using browser extensions to increase the site’s functionality, only download and install extensions from sites you trust.
One trick is to use various quotes from your most recent blog post or testimonials about your recent product and link to the website page many different times. You can also Pin the same Pin to different boards. For example, if you write a blog post about buying the best homeowners insurance, that can go on a board that only holds your blog posts, it can also go on a board that talks about financial planning and a board that talks about homeownership.
Facebook, Google, Instagram – all major sources of traffic are constantly evolving. Pinterest, however, changes more rapidly than all these three put together. At least, it often feels that way. Every 2 months or so, I see them testing out new features (as I have quite the big business account, I probably see some features that never get rolled out to average users).
Pinterest is a goldmine when it comes to marketing. But finding success with Pinterest marketing goes beyond just having a great profile image and company description.Making Pinterest marketing work boils down to having a clear strategy that resonates with your business goals. Because ultimately, building a strong presence on Pinterest is only possible when you’re headed in the right direction.
SocialPilot Lite is free to schedule up to 30 pins and post 10 times per day. Their individual plan is $10 a month and comes with considerably more. You can schedule up to 1000 posts in your queue and post 50 times per day. The content discovery tools are limited while the analytics they provide are non-existent in this basic package. Tailwind and even Buffer have a wider variety of Pinterest automation tools available for this pricing level.
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