The more boards you have, the more pins your can schedule. It also depends on the group board you belong to. If there are only 10 contributors, your pins may flood their feed. If that’s the case you just have to pop in to your boards and not put those types of boards in your schedule. I belong to over a 100 group boards, but not all of them are in my Tailwind schedule. Many of them only have 5 or 10 contributors, so I don’t pin to them or have stopped pinning to them until they get more contributors.

The creators of this software intended to help you maximize your Pinterest strategy. The Tailwind app works well for bloggers, business owners, social media managers, and beginners alike. It also supports Instagram besides Pinterest. The full list of included tools is too long to fully expand upon. However, here’s a sneak peek of what you can expect to get out of Tailwind.

Collaborative boards can help you reach a new group of pinners and have your pins be seen by more people. You do need to be careful about which boards you join because all the pins will show on your Pinterest presence as well. You can only select the cover photo if you are the owner of the group board. One of my newest collaborative boards is my Pinterest Tips for Success board. All the pinners are fantastic about adding great content and sharing their Pinterest skills.
I wouldn’t worry too much about not getting a response. I sometimes don’t respond to my emails; I just let people in the group. Make sure to check your Pinterest notifications! I would also try lower tiered group boards with a lower reach to get in. These group owners are more than happy to let you in because they are trying to grow your followers.

The last step is to create your first board. To make it easier for users to find your content, such as blogs, special offers, new products, and more — create a business board first and then add relevant Pins. For example, for blog content you’ve posted on your first board, you can then create feature images for each blog post and include a summary of the post in the description to pique user interest.

Boards are used to organize and categorize Pins (don’t worry, we’ll get to these next). From Boards about the new bathroom and next vacation location to wedding planning and ultimate wish-lists (just say the word and we’ll link you to ours). Boards enable users to gather their Pins into a logical and beautiful fashion. Plus, Boards can be divided up into sections, to make them even more organized.
People use Pinterest for different reasons than they use networks like Facebook and Instagram. Pinterest is a network where people look for inspiration, including specifically seeking out ideas about new products to buy. That means they are excited to see posts from brands in their feeds. According to eMarketer, only Facebook outranks Pinterest in terms of influencing U.S. social media users’ purchasing decisions.
Pinterest is no social media channel, but a visual search engine. I’ve lost count how often I repeated this mantra in the last 3 years and recently even Pinterest officials are using similar terms. In the early days of Pinterest, people would follow other users and see what they liked in their feeds. But these days an increasing number of people will use it to search for recipes, wedding inspiration or travel guides. They are searching.
If you’ve ever wanted a way to boost impulse buys, Buyable Pins are the answer. As users browse through Pinterest, creating boards and getting ideas, they’ll be able to see your product, the price, and purchase it all with a few quick taps or clicks on their mobile device. They don’t even have to re-enter their payment information each time they buy, making the process go quickly—before they get the chance to talk themselves out of it.

You can now confirm your Instagram, YouTube and Etsy account on Pinterest. Why does this matter? It matters in two ways! One, when people pin your content from those platforms TO Pinterest, your account will get attributed with engagement. Your impressions, visibility and engagement will go up. I’ve noticed, after confirming these platforms with my client’s accounts, that fans were pinning their items on Pinterest all along.
Once you hit the Claim button, you are given instructions on how to verify and claim your website. These instructions include placing a tag or code on your website for verification. You can have someone on your team place a specific code on your website or, if you need someone else to handle this rather tech-savvy step, you can hire someone from Fiverr to do it for you.
If you continue to scroll down your setting page, you will see a spot that says “Claim,” you want to enter your website into the box and hit the “Claim” button. This will allow you to track any pins that are pinned from your website and your profile picture — in this case, your logo — will show up next to any pins that come from your website as well as create ads and buyable pins.
Oftentimes, our own audiences are pretty small, which means we can’t get the reach and clicks we need. So, starting a new ad group using an actalike is a great way to find people with similar interests and behaviors and increase your impressions 30X while keeping CTR high. Start with a 1% similarity and branch out from there if you need still more.
No matter what you’re advertising — and no matter what platform you’re advertising on — it’s essential to include a call-to-action to encourage your audience to take the next step. By simply adding “Sign up”, “Learn more”, or “Visit site” to your Pinterest ad, you can inspire users to take action. By doing so you can increase conversions by up to 80%!
In the last podcast episode, we dove into how to make Pinterest work for your business. If you’re struggling to find your groove while creating your profile, boards, or pins, go back and listen to that episode. That will give you a really good foundation to jump into this week’s episode, where we’ll focus on how to create a Pinterest marketing strategy.
To make the most of your Pinterest ads, always create a Pinterest post-click landing page to direct all of your traffic to. This type of dedicated page is the best place for users to “land” after clicking your pin, and will significantly help convert prospects into leads because it’s free of distractions (e.g. header navigation, social icons, etc.).
Tiffany! I love the way you write. I think you write the way you talk so I felt like I was sitting right there next to you and listening with perked ears! Thank you so much. You took a headache inducing topic and simplified it. This was my first time on your blog and I loved every minute of it. I am a new blogger so I needed to hear this. And that Milo Tree recommendation, I am onto it. Thanks again!
My latest Pinterest tip is to create a “Pins I’ve Clicked Through Board.” I fully believe that you are your best researcher for your audience. After all, if you are interested enough to write and research about it you should be your best audience. For many of us, Pinterest is a huge traffic driver for our blogs and websites. Honestly, when I want to know something I will generally search it on Pinterest before I go to Google.
Now please, don’t go rushing off writing make-up tutorials on a travel blog. You’d probably have to solve this riddle through content curation. The more often somebody pins one of your pins, the more often they are shown your pins. This should be your ultimate goal. That being said, you could use it as inspiration as well, as even a travel blogger could be writing about an especially tasty local recipe.
Interest targeting and keyword targeting, however, hold more value than they’re typically given on other platforms. Choosing the right keywords is essential to ensuring your content pops up in the right searches organically, and the same is true for ad targeting. Choosing the right interests will help Pinterest place your ads with users who are most likely to be interested in seeing them when browsing. 

Your growth story is very inspiring. You already had over 600 followers though! That’s a lot compared to my measly 30. Do you think your strategies help from the very beginning? I’m probably still too new to contribute to group pages, though I feel I have valuable content. If you have advice for beginners that is different from what you’ve already mentioned, I’d really appreciate hearing it!
My best Pinterest tip is to be focused. Once I identified WHY I use Pinterest, I was able to focus my boards and pins on what really matters – growing my Pinterest following, and attracting other bloggers and prospective clients. Each time I click to pin or repin I ask myself, “Is this pin of value to my target audience?” If the answer isn’t yes, I don’t pin it.
 I’ve seen articles advising on the best times to Pin as well, but I generally take these with a pinch of salt as the content I pin spreads across International time zones. Also, you’ll find that a good pin will have a MUCH longer shelf-life than something on Twitter or Facebook. People are still pinning my old stuff months later – that simply doesn’t happen on most other social networks!
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I think the underlying major issue here is that NO ONE marketing tactic works. If it did, we’d all stick to enhancing our websites to be the best they could be. But no – blogs became popular because you could engage the consumer in a “conversation” via comments and they seem to lure more followers than a static website does. And then FB and Twitter and others, and now Pinterest. No one method seems perfect so business owners are all over the place trying every thing they can. Kind of makes you crazy…Now Pinterest is hot but as someone posted above, I, too, cannot get the search to work. I have searched on terms I know are on my own board names or pin descriptions and nothing comes up. It seems you have to know someone is on Pinterest and then begin following them… so I don’t know if a business can acquire new followers by someone generically searching on their subject matter if the search engine is so weird. But that brings me back to the Pinterest terms which say “no commercial use”!

So, how can your business use Pinterest as a marketing tactic to help improve your brand awareness and conversions? In this guide, we’ll cover the answer to that question as well as which Pinterest marketing strategies you should implement, how small businesses can benefit from the platform, and which tools you can use to ensure your Pinterest marketing strategy works for your business.

As a general rule, you want your boards to be 50 percent about your business and 50 percent about the interests of your audience that tie back to your business. By pinning your audience interest as well as your own content, you will entice them to engage with you more on Pinterest. When they engage with you more, Pinterest will show users your content more frequently in their feed. 

Once you’ve marketed yourself on Pinterest, a great way to bring it back home would be to embed your Pinterest feed on your website (http://www.postano.com/solutions/for-websites/). This way, you’re still exposing the content you’re posting on Pinterest to more eyes for those that visit your site that aren’t yet on Pinterest. Although it seems like everyone is on Pinterest, you’d be surprised how many people still aren’t.

I am not paying for Tailwind’s paid plan just yet. Make sure that you have either archived or deleted your boards that have nothing to do with your niche. If you frequently share other bloggers’ work, you can create a board for that. I labeled mine “Bloggers Network”. Try to schedule at least 10-20 pins every single day, spread out on different boards and definitely start using Tribes! With Tailwind’s free account, you can share up to 80 pins to Tribes, and those should be your most popular pins from your blog because those are the ones that will get repinned by other pinners within the group. I hope this helps! If you’re struggling to nail down your niche and find your blogging voice, you can check out this post https://melissablevins.com/finding-your-voice-through-blogging 🙂 Let me know if you have any other questions!

How are you and your family doing, I hope all is well. My name is Larry Ward Sr. I was searching through Pinterest for boards to follow. I came across your blogging post, I’m interested in being a blogger. I don’t have any experience how can I learn how to write good blogs. This is something I have been wanting to do for a very long time. Any advice you have to get me started on my journey would be appreciated. I love the details and sources that you provide. Thank you for all your help sincerely


I don’t even know how many studies I’ve read on which color performed better than the other and how showing faces was a no-no. Pinterest has confirmed that these are false positives. A beauty pin without a face might be quite ridiculous and even though cold tones are said to perform not as good, a pin about a trip to Antartica would probably look weird with warm colors. If you are not sure about your design, produce alternatives and show them to a control group or just dish them out and focus on the pin that performs best.
@Sean Locke – agreed. Those are exactly my points. I may have a blog and a website with images I’ve chosen to share with the world (and now I need to watermark all of them because of Pinterest), but that doesn’t mean I am allowing people to use them for business purposes. Pin them on an inspiration board for personal use – I’m fine with that. Pin them on a business-related board in order to draw visitors to their Pinterest board I am not fine with. If a landscaper’s business suddenly increases because he has 25 amazing boards of other people’s garden photos, he owes them some credit/money. He would not be allowed, exactly as you said, to grab their images and include them on his blog, website, or printed marketing materials… so I don’t think it’s right to creatively use them on Pinterest if your Pinterest board is remotely commercial. Even if the main image keeps its link back to the original source. It just doesn’t seem right.
Me again- going through the list now and writing some things down to keep in mind for later and making changes as I go along- care to elaborate a bit more on #44 – “Do you have a number of different ideal client personas? Create a separate board to represent each client persona, then use those boards during your sales cycle and embed them into your website pages so people are clear about the kinds of clients you’re trying to attract.”
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