Agreed that it is fuzzy. But if their terms say “no commercial use” and some suggestions state to have a board devoted to your coupons, your URLs, your classes, etc., how is that not violating their terms? I did write directly to Pinterest with my questions asking for clarification and have not rec’d a response yet. If they are ok with this fuzzy use, I’ll be jumping on board… but for now I am leery. Especially because as an artist myself and as a website designer working with artists who are especially sensitive about copyright issues, one would never take another artist’s image and post it on their business website or blog, or publish it on their printed brochure, w/out the artist’s permission. if a business sets up a Pinterest series of boards and utilizes other’s pics to generate interest in their business… that opens up a huge can of worms. Example – a landscape design firm starts a business board and pins other people’s images of gardens, stone walkways, etc., and suddenly business picks up because interested customers just found their Pinned boards interesting. They didn’t pay for those images or obtain permission to use them – free stock photography! It is VERY fuzzy!

A note on ad groups. Your ad group is where you set your daily budget and all your targeting. It can be very tempting to break out your targeting into dozens of ad groups for easy analysis. If you have time for that, by all means, go ahead, but be aware that if your ad groups are below about $5/day, it’s going to take a long time to get a clear picture of what is working and what isn’t. After all, if you bid $.25, and your daily budget is $1, how long will it take before you know if those clicks are converting at a decent rate?


One example of a successful campaign was the one that they ran last year. The furniture retailer realized that back-to-school was one of their key seasons because students are going to college and they have both limited budgets and space. Add that to the fact that about 50% of millennials use Pinterest, and there’s a massive opportunity for selling to college students.
We want people on Pinterest to understand who's promoting content. You can't manage more than one advertiser through a single account or change the advertiser on an account. You also can't create boards for someone else (for example, if you're an agency) and promote stuff from those boards. Instead, you can help someone else promote ads from their own account.
You’re always going to find the standard tips you read everywhere: use high-quality images; focus on a long vertical with bright colors; craft a killer headline. But the most surprising piece of advice I have received is to practice skillful social listening on Pinterest. Find the people who have pinned your content by going to Pinterest.com/Source/[YourURL]. Then, leave them a comment thanking them for pinning it. This is so easy, yet it is such a rare occurrence that this simple gesture roots you in the mind of those people who have already encountered and enjoyed your content. This is a powerful way to build a devoted following. 
There is one caveat, though. They said that square pins are okay as well. Now, when I say “they said”, they are speaking from a pure UX point of view. It’s what they want because it has the least design problems. What they want and what really works are two things altogether. Google has been droning on an on how important switching to SSL is, but as of now, it still is not an important ranking signal. So, I feel you should stick to the 2:3 ratio but ever so often create different sized pins and experiment a bit. Why? Because it might be your chance to stick out!
Include CTAs in your visual. The visual you use in the promoted pin should focus on catching the user's attention in a feed full of other appealing pins. Including direct CTAs in your visual will not just take away the visual appeal from your pin, but also get your ad disapproved. Make use of "soft" CTAs (like "Here's how to write a compelling blog post") when promoting a checklist you'll be redirecting them to.
Similar to other advertising channels, Pinterest has its own Tag, which is a piece of code that is applied to your website. With the Tag, you will be able to better measure the effectiveness of your campaigns, understand customer paths from engagements to conversions, define audiences for remarketing and track a number of events such as page visits, category views, searches, cart additions, checkouts, video views, signups and leads.
Thanks for the advice, Tamara. I’ve been marketing on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and even a little on Flickr. And I’m working on producing blog content now. I knew marketing efforts take longer than a month to be most effective- but after a month I am looking for ways to make improvements and how to better approach my marketing strategy. I feel like my actual marketing messages aren’t ideal- so I’m working on building the blog and filling it with useful content. I’m going to be blogging about what’s going on in our shop, our inspiration, free craft tutorials and crafty business advice- I think that will help with establishing myself as an expert and also building a stronger following. What do you think?
Technically, we are building out an internet scale personalized recommendation engine in 22+ languages, which requires a deep understanding of the users and content on our platform.  As an engineer on the Pin Knowledge team, you’ll work on content classification, user modeling, personalization and ranking. Engineers of this team often make measurably positive impact on hundreds of millions of users with improved machine learning modeling and featurization breakthroughs.
First, do some searching on Pinterest so that you understand how Pinterest searching works. Then, take note of which results show up first and how the Pinterest feed organizes the pins and boards. Notice which keywords are suggested as being together automatically and which of these keywords are relevant to your pins. You want to do these searches on both desktop and mobile devices so that you understand what looks different on each device.
With your Pinterest for business account, you can view analytics like what pins people are liking on your profile and what they save from your website, and you can learn more about what content users would like to see more of from your profile. You can also discover your audience metrics including their demographic information and what their other interests are.
SocialPilot Lite is free to schedule up to 30 pins and post 10 times per day. Their individual plan is $10 a month and comes with considerably more. You can schedule up to 1000 posts in your queue and post 50 times per day. The content discovery tools are limited while the analytics they provide are non-existent in this basic package. Tailwind and even Buffer have a wider variety of Pinterest automation tools available for this pricing level. 
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